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The diary entries of a little girl in her 30s! ~ Part 2 - Page 52  

post #766 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

So, as I mentioned a while back, my crazy-ass older brother is thinking about buying a Pagani. 

 

Did I just see that car get started with a USB stick?

 

I hate new cars...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gelocks View Post

I haven't even used the Clip Zip player yet and I'm already looking to get on of those Hisound players... The Studio V caught my attention with its touted 50+ hours of playtime...  Does anyone here owns one of these? Also, would I just be better with the Clip Zip + Leckerton UHA-6SMKII combo? Or is the Studio V + external amp overkill? (i.e. the Studio seems to have a good amp section?)

 

IMO, the players to beware of are the ones that sell themselves as 'audiophile'.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post

LOL, actually, we've had a few words that has made it to our academic council of the swedish language (or so to say, those are the guys who decides what is what is not okay to use in dictionaries and our language) because people just simply wouldn't learn how to spell them. I can't blame those as some of our grammar rules can be pretty weird. A lot of people just can't learn the difference between "they" and "them".

 

The thought of people sitting around trying to define what constitutes an "official" part of the language strikes me as incredibly hilarious...

post #767 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverickronin View Post

IMO, the players to beware of are the ones that sell themselves as 'audiophile'.

 

 

You must be familiar with the quote from shigzeo in my sig then. smile.gif


Edited by Achmedisdead - 9/18/12 at 12:43pm
post #768 of 21760
I'm having a blast playing around with my 808 PureView. Its camera is just so very very powerful, considering that it's just a phone. And it doesn't fail as a normal, down-to-earth phone too. Just need a phone holder tripod mount and I'm good to go.
post #769 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

 

The comic is primarily directed at people who should already know better, yes. I gather it's also a riff of some kind on an educational public service announcement series in Canadian media, but I don't know much about that.

 

Leave it to the English language to have irregular pronouns, though.

 

My partner's native language is not English. Her English is excellent, though there are a few things that frustrate her:

1. Puns. Mostly they annoy, because she finds puns hard to understand.

2. Terms for personal relationships. For example, English has "uncle", but no words to distinguish "mother's brother" from "father's brother", for example.

3. Terms for food and eating. English conflates "hot" as meaning both a sensation of temperature and sensation of capsaicin. And most conversational terms for sensations of food textures are negative -- or example, the sliminess of okra, or mushiness of oatmeal -- even where those sensations are inherent to the appeal of the foods.

I can relate to her sentiments about the english language. It's the same in french and to the best of my knowledge, in finnish as well. In swedish we have explicit names for mothers brother and sister, and fathers brother and sister. In the other languages I speak, they don't. As for 'hot', it's the same in swedish, but I think it's mostly due to the fact that swedish (and sweden) is becoming more and more americanized in many ways. Corporate lingo is almost entirely based on english/american names and phrases, for instance 'outsourcing', most names within development, 'business' and so on and so forth. I guess it's easier to call them by their english name and not try to translate a word with no prior translation/meaning. Also, if everyone uses english terms, the risk of misunderstanding is less than if we started translating the terms into Swedish (some terms would require whole sentences for translation).

Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post


Well I followed his comic for a long time, but his views on religion is kind of tiring for me; lets leave at that. Well, it's heartening to see that you have two job opportunities in the near future in this kind of times. I myself am quite worried after I finish my course.

Ah, as I told MF I haven't really looked at his comics before. Some of them are funny, and I really liked the one about the dog.

Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

Working around the medical industry can be both rewarding and maddening for a techie. I currently work for a small medical device mfr and I really like it - but this is far from a hospital. The number of non-technical folks in hospitals is staggering and that can be a big challenge - it requires *significant* patience and people skills. Even folks that you would think would be technical - like scientific researchers, can be clueless about basic HW/SW - and they can be a real pain in the rear. The data security aspects of medical records can also be exhausting - endless audits from gov't agencies, etc, etc. On the other side of the coin, helping really cool science to get done is very, very rewarding - and the more you try to understand what your users are really trying to accomplish, the better and more valuable you will be. Far too many HW/SW folks just want to sit in front of their monitors and not be bothered to learn what their work is REALLY being used for - and that's very short-sighted. If budgets get tight and someone needs to be cut, who do you think will be the first to go - the smart code monkey that has shows no real interest in the business and that shuns contact with people outside of tech friends, or the smart code monkey that has worked directly with the key business stakeholders to make sure that the systems being delivered meet the real business needs and not just the tech spec thrown over the wall into his cage?
Sorry - I slipped into mentor mode - I've given that speech more times than I care to remember... wink.gif

LOL Mentor mode is alright. I don't mind it at all .. all tips are welcome.

 

As for working in the medical field or specifically in hospitals, I can imagine all of that being very true. We'll see what they have to say for their defence tomorrow! wink.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by maverickronin View Post

 

The thought of people sitting around trying to define what constitutes an "official" part of the language strikes me as incredibly hilarious...

LOL, yeah I can imagine that. These are the people: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_Academy

 

From my understanding, they are in charge of the Nobel prize (at least in literature) as well.

post #770 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post

From my understanding, them are in charge of the Nobel prize (at least in literature) as well.

 

FTFY.  wink.gif


Home of the Liquid Carbon, Liquid Crimson, Liquid Glass, Liquid Gold and
Liquid Lightning headphone amplifiers... and the upcoming Liquid Spark!

post #771 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post

Ah, as I told MF I haven't really looked at his comics before. Some of them are funny, and I really liked the one about the dog.

Well his comics do tend to venture into the funny side in my opinion. It's just that one needs to have thicker tolerances and not just flip tables when he takes a shot at something you hold dear. He's an equal-opportunist in my eyes, whether his fans are going to agree with him or not.
post #772 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post

LOL, yeah I can imagine that. These are the people: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_Academy

 

From my understanding, they are in charge of the Nobel prize (at least in literature) as well.

 

Do they desperately pretend to be relevant and insist on beating average people over the head with a never ending deluge of synonyms like the French equivalent?

post #773 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverickronin View Post

Do they desperately pretend to be relevant and insist on beating average people over the head with a never ending deluge of synonyms like the French equivalent?

French anglicisms were always something I was amused about.

The Dutch language welcomes English terms with open arms -- as long as we apply proper grammar to it. For example, the past participle of 'to download' is 'gedownloadde' in Dutch, or the second person singular past tense of 'to race' is 'jij racete'. It looks really confusing in writing to native speakers like me, but in pronunciation it's fairly natural.
post #774 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tilpo View Post

French anglicisms were always something I was amused about.

 

It always struck me as clannish and tribal.  Anyone attempting to do the same sort of thing in English would just be laughed out of the room.  Even the people who edit dictionaries do it descriptively rather than proscriptively.  Half of of English is stolen from other languages anyway, which is why there aren't any consistent rules in English grammar or spelling.  A good chunk of that ill gotten vocabulary was stolen from French to begin with.  That's why cow flesh is beef and chicken parts are poultry.

 

What bothers me is that they're telling other people what to do instead of letting the language evolve naturally.  I could care less what country a word comes from.  I just want to be able to communicate effectively.

post #775 of 21760

Really enjoying cPlay. Thought it was good before. Seems I was using a version that wasn't optimized for the Quad Core. Hearing even more detail than before. Nothing else is touching this program considering sound quality.... Not J River, Media Monkey Gold, Foobar, nothing...
 


Edited by lee730 - 9/18/12 at 2:51pm
post #776 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post

I can relate to her sentiments about the english language. It's the same in french and to the best of my knowledge, in finnish as well. In swedish we have explicit names for mothers brother and sister, and fathers brother and sister. In the other languages I speak, they don't. As for 'hot', it's the same in swedish, but I think it's mostly due to the fact that swedish (and sweden) is becoming more and more americanized in many ways. Corporate lingo is almost entirely based on english/american names and phrases, for instance 'outsourcing', most names within development, 'business' and so on and so forth. I guess it's easier to call them by their english name and not try to translate a word with no prior translation/meaning. Also, if everyone uses english terms, the risk of misunderstanding is less than if we started translating the terms into Swedish (some terms would require whole sentences for translation).

 

The terms may as well arise when the need calls for them. British cuisine (and, to the best of my awareness, Scandinavian cuisines as well) are pretty mild. There's not much need for a word for spice heat when it barely exists as such; and to the extend that it does, it's in a relatively undifferentiated way.

 

Countries with strong Confucian traditions put crazy amounts of energy into tracking rank: Who's the elder, who's the younger, who's connected to whom and how. Since the father's-brother's-son has precedence over the father's-sister's-son, there are probably terms for them to make it less cumbersome to distinguish your cousins.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by maverickronin View Post

Do they desperately pretend to be relevant and insist on beating average people over the head with a never ending deluge of synonyms like the French equivalent?

 

It's an easy thing to mock at but fundamentally it's the behavior of a country that does not have a tradition of aggressively assimilating foreign terms and expressions. English speakers take a lot of pleasure in the diversity of linguistic roots and have the attitude that whatever satisfies the need is a suitable word. Other countries are more defensive about their languages and linguistic purity, and it's different -- maybe more awkward -- but doesn't strike me as wrong. After all, the delegation in the story seem fully resigned to their job being an advisory one, producing words the public might or might not latch on to -- and some words do.

post #777 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

The terms may as well arise when the need calls for them. British cuisine (and, to the best of my awareness, Scandinavian cuisines as well) are pretty mild. There's not much need for a word for spice heat when it barely exists as such; and to the extend that it does, it's in a relatively undifferentiated way.

Countries with strong Confucian traditions put crazy amounts of energy into tracking rank: Who's the elder, who's the younger, who's connected to whom and how. Since the father's-brother's-son has precedence over the father's-sister's-son, there are probably terms for them to make it less cumbersome to distinguish your cousins.


It's an easy thing to mock at but fundamentally it's the behavior of a country that does not have a tradition of aggressively assimilating foreign terms and expressions. English speakers take a lot of pleasure in the diversity of linguistic roots and have the attitude that whatever satisfies the need is a suitable word. Other countries are more defensive about their languages and linguistic purity, and it's different -- maybe more awkward -- but doesn't strike me as wrong. After all, the delegation in the story seem fully resigned to their job being an advisory one, producing words the public might or might not latch on to -- and some words do.

But it's a hopeless, losing battle. The world is too small and the communications are too fast. You can't put up a Maginot Line and hope to keep your language & culture pure.
post #778 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverickronin View Post

 

Do they desperately pretend to be relevant and insist on beating average people over the head with a never ending deluge of synonyms like the French equivalent?

 

French are more competitive. They used to have the biggest and most influential literature in Europe. 

 

Russian stand-up comic laughs at foreign English words which in big number flooded into Russian language

 

post #779 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverickronin View Post

 

 Half of of English is stolen from other languages anyway

 

All

post #780 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverickronin View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tilpo View Post

French anglicisms were always something I was amused about.

 

It always struck me as clannish and tribal.  Anyone attempting to do the same sort of thing in English would just be laughed out of the room.  Even the people who edit dictionaries do it descriptively rather than proscriptively.  Half of of English is stolen from other languages anyway, which is why there aren't any consistent rules in English grammar or spelling.  A good chunk of that ill gotten vocabulary was stolen from French to begin with.  That's why cow flesh is beef and chicken parts are poultry.

 

What bothers me is that they're telling other people what to do instead of letting the language evolve naturally.  I could care less what country a word comes from.  I just want to be able to communicate effectively.

 

Inside my reading room, I have a 1950 edition of "Word Origin & Their Romantic Stories" by Wilfred Funk. Best read with pizza, as some of these stories are amusing. Okay, maybe not, ain't got protective sleeves on it...blink.gif

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