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The diary entries of a little girl in her 30s! ~ Part 2 - Page 221  

post #3301 of 21761
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kiteki View Post

I know, you like girls in outer-space.

 

 

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post #3302 of 21761

Compoopers, I'm glad that you have discovered Soil&Pimp Sessions, as they are an awesome band. You might like Ego Wrappin, too.

post #3303 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

Genre tagging is a nuisance. I would just as soon it be abolished.

 

Do you object to the way tagging is implemented, or the genres themselves? It does beg the question, what would work better... I suspect the answer is actually: nothing, it's a brute force categorisation that gets less useful the more complicated it gets. Map-territory relation and all.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by compoopers View Post

I guess I am sort of making my own problem. I really just want modular playlists, that's all. Like, I want to be able to listen to ALL my electronic music, but I also might be in the mood for ONLY my chiptunes music, which is a subgenre of electronic. So if I tag my chiptunes music as "chiptunes; electronic", then if I want to listen to only chiptunes, I just go to my chiptunes playlist, and if I want to listen to only electronic, I go to my electronic playlist. But if I want to listen to both, I can look up "electronic" genre and they'll both be there. Does that make sense? anyway, it makes sense to me, but it seems like most people don't listen to music in the same way as me. On that note, how do you listen to music? Do you just set up different playlists for all your needs? Some people tell me they only listen to full albums, but I can't do that.

 

It does make sense, but it sounds like the only way you can do it, as much as you hate redundancy, is have multiples.

 

I listen to either full albums or, when I am feeling a bit nuts, just on shuffle.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kiteki View Post

I think music / audio is more sine-waves than it is volume.  I think people tend to use measurements more as a tool of self-satisfaction, rather than as a tool of investigation and science.

 

I feel like they can be helpful, especially in terms of sine wave / square wav graphs telling you how technically competent something might sound or how two headphones might compare. But even then I've found looking at a whole frequency response graph tells me very little; comparing the 7550 to the EX1000 on graphs alone I would not have guessed that the 7550 would be soooo much more to my liking. Looking at the UE6000 graph I would have expected them to be horrible (and I did, which is why I was so surprised.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

Nice job on the impressions a_rec. Naturally the one I'm most interested in is the MDR-1R, so the suspense is building!

 

I did get a chance to play around with the UE6000 at Best Buy a few weeks ago. The build quality is decidedly plastic-y but solid; I like the way they've given the headband a sleek but robust quality, kinda reminiscent of some rapper 'muffs. The style is aggressive but clean in my opinion. In contrast the new Denons are just over-designed and messy. Soundwise I too was surprised by how balanced they sounded, though it was a little hard to tell with the default music they were using. Is the UE9000 supposed to sound the same, just loaded with more features? As one might expect, these things are reportedly better in passive / wired mode anyway, so the additional feature set isn't particularly important to me, though I'm still curious as to how the UE6000 and UE9000 compare just as straight up headphones.

 

It's good that we're seeing new entries into closed, semi-portable fullsized headphones that sound good. To that end, I think this year was the "year of the closed headphone," what with the aforementioned UE6000, Momentum, TMA-1 Studio, and MDR-1R. Then there was the TH900 (which isn't really isolating) and announced TH600, along with the new Audez'e closed-back prototype. AKG's K501 gained in popularity quite a bit, though I still feel it's a pretty awful sounding headphone for my personal tastes with its metallic tone and hollow presentation; they also apparently released a silver version with a pretty neon-blue cable tailored for iPhones.

 

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Yeah, the UE6000 is surprisingly competent and clean; I guess that the money is in this segment now and the competition has to be good because most customers will make their decisions on the basis of a 10 second in store demo. On this basis I think the UE6000 might not actually do that well compared to something more aggressive. I think it's great that Logitech didn't gum it up though, but they make some pretty good other audio products so I guess they actually care.

 

Its funny how it takes a few years for the manufacturers to play catch up to industry trends.

 

And omg I want one. Just to play metal slug. I have no childhood association with arcades but I have friends that do, and I find myself feeling sympathetically excited with them since I like seeing people with intense hobbies lol.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

While we're on the subject of gaming, something has been on my mind as of late: the potential ramifications of all this online and multiplayer connectivity. For me, playing folks online isn't particularly rewarding, so I've mostly ignored it in favor of well-constructed single player experiences and playing with friends in person. Like, sitting amongst a group of friends. Now that so many videogames are emphasizing larger communities consisting of people you don't know, I'm wondering what will become of these games in, say, 10 years? We can still play fighting games with friends that are 10+ years old and have a good time. However what becomes of the game that relies on a community infrastructure, when there's no one around to play with and the company has shut down the servers? Especially now that so many games are pushing for integration, you've got single player games that rely on assets you gain from playing online with others, and in some cases the former depends on the latter, so you wont even be able to effectively play the single player game when the online component is gone. Take a game like Mass Effect 3. What happens when you want to play the game in 15 years? Getting the best ending in what is essentially a single player game largely depends on getting enough points from online play, so in 15 years it seems like you wont be able to get the best ending in such a game.

 

Are we going to look back at this era in gaming in 20 years and see a bunch of ghost towns?

 

I feel like a broken record saying this because it's my standard form reply every single time the topic of gaming comes up, but I feel more optimistic about the state of gaming now more than ever. Yes the large studios are putting their money into large and very multiplayer driven experiences, just because they are driven by profit maximisation; they have shareholders to impress after all. Some of their behaviour, including the DLC stuff, is downright unethical.

 

I do feel like digital distribution has changed the landscape entirely though, because that entire large developer, large team format is going to become a bit moribund. More and more talent is going to go into indie gaming, making very highly crafted single and multiplayer experiences that are a lot more resistant to some of the stringing along of players that passes for gameplay now. And because of the stronger revenue share with things like app stores and kickstarter, it won't be long until there are independant gaming devs start working on larger projects; in that respect they will probably come to resemble the small talented teams that made older games like Deus Ex or etc; before there were shareholders to appease.

 

If it sounds like I suspect the profit motive, I do in some fields when it fails to align with the expectations of the actual consumers. The quality of a game is important to the customers and the devs (hopefully), but just a datapoint for the stockholders. 

 

I know that the above point just sounds like indie gaming kool-aid but I'm an optimist at heart.

 

I have no idea how, for instance, Blizzard will defy their shareholders and continue on their 'When its done and sometimes it never is' over time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by compoopers View Post

I see what you're saying. Personally, I HATE the way DLC works nowadays. Before, you'd get a solid full game and then maybe extension packs that were definitely worth $10-$20. Nowadays developers release shoddy, bug-ridden games and since everyone does it it's become acceptable. First day DLC and prepurchase bonuses are so bogus. And maybe it's just me, but the prices seem to have risen while the amount of content in extension packs has gone down drastically... $3 for a gun? $5 for a MAP? It used to be $10 for a whole new campaign and dozens of new units and now they're doing this. I hate all of that stuff.
I get the problem you are having with single player games with multiplayer components as well. It seems like every game has a multiplayer component nowadays. Look at Dark Souls/Demon Souls -- invasions and stuff are a huge part of the experience even though the game is a single player game. Etc.
Another interesting thing is games like Skyrim. At least for me, half the fun is modding and changing things. In many years when those mod databases go down, a lot of content will disappear...

 

It would be nice if more publishers relinquished their rights over the IP and turned stuff over to the open source community. Of course, now that publishers stand a chance of reaping a second windfall over retro releases...

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

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So awesome. If you didn't already just change your DP, this would be a great choice!

post #3304 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by compoopers View Post

I guess I am sort of making my own problem. I really just want modular playlists, that's all. Like, I want to be able to listen to ALL my electronic music, but I also might be in the mood for ONLY my chiptunes music, which is a subgenre of electronic. So if I tag my chiptunes music as "chiptunes; electronic", then if I want to listen to only chiptunes, I just go to my chiptunes playlist, and if I want to listen to only electronic, I go to my electronic playlist. But if I want to listen to both, I can look up "electronic" genre and they'll both be there. Does that make sense? anyway, it makes sense to me, but it seems like most people don't listen to music in the same way as me. On that note, how do you listen to music? Do you just set up different playlists for all your needs? Some people tell me they only listen to full albums, but I can't do that.

 

I think what you want is 'Nested Playlists'.  iTunes does this very well, actually.  It allows you to create smart playlists that can include other playlists which in turn include other playlists, etc, etc, ad nauseum.  Basically you set up very granular/specific playlists, in you case by genre, and then you can create a playlist that includes any number of those granular lists.  For example, create two playlists:  one strictly 'electronic' and the other strictly 'chiptunes'.  Then create a smart playlist and call it, say, 'all electronic' which includes both 'electronic' and 'chiptunes'.  This would allow you to listen (or sync) to only 'chiptunes', only 'electronic', or 'all electronic' which includes both.  You can nest playlists this way as deep as you like.  I believe someone here on head-fi had a thread where he showed exactly how he structured his.  His problem, while similar to yours, was vastly more complex as he primarily listened to Classical.  As you probably know, classical is a pain to tag/classify because of the numerous performances by different orchestras, different conductors, etc, etc.  Look here:  http://www.head-fi.org/t/518613/my-music-server

post #3305 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

Yes, I find genre tags confusing at best.

 

My old Sony walkman had a neat function that would scan all the songs and match them to some algorithm that detected similar styles, or at least similar moods / tempos. It worked a lot better than genre matching, or something like Apple's Genius (guffaw) which just falls apart trying to work out content that isn't (*gasp*) sold on iTunes. I wish there was more of that kind of thing. Maybe you could get a program that could build playlists like that? It also took hours to scan through the music, so I guess you win some you lose some.

 

I'm still using MusicIP Mixer for this, even though it's no longer supported, simply because I haven't come across anything else that gives better results. The initial music scan takes ages, but processing of new additions is fairly quick. It features configurable mixing and an option to send the result to your default player. I generate style matched mixes with MusicIP Mixer, send them to MediaMonkey and sync the resulting playlists with my DAPs. Works like a charm.

post #3306 of 21761

I've been debating buying a Neo Geo MVS console for awhile now, but they're all like 5-$600.  the games are a lot cheaper once you have one, though.

 


Edited by driver 8 - 12/10/12 at 3:26pm
post #3307 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

Do you object to the way tagging is implemented, or the genres themselves? It does beg the question, what would work better... I suspect the answer is actually: nothing, it's a brute force categorisation that gets less useful the more complicated it gets. Map-territory relation and all.

 

The way tagging is implemented.

 

ID3 was designed with as much forethought as possible... in 1998. As such, there are some things the planners couldn't anticipate and some things that weren't practical then but seem like no-brainers now. And since it was created by more or less an ad-hoc group filling a need, rather than metadata experts, there are some novel solutions and the inevitable hacker whimsey...

 

 

Quote:
 Picture type:  $11  A bright coloured fish

 

Keep in mind that the majority of ID3 metadata is stuff you can't or shouldn't be able to edit, such as playback time and file structure and attributes. And it's not a standard, it's a de-facto standard -- meaning there are reference documents and best practices but no official consensus and means of enforcement. And it was designed specifically for use with the MP3 file format; its use in other audio formats is anywhere between nonexistent and implicit. So it's often up to the media player (iTunes, Foobar, Winamp, etc.) to maintain its own file database to store the tags and attributes that a given file format doesn't allow, to allow the media player's user to be able to manage all music files in a uniform way. Of course, when you move a well-tagged file from one player to another, the data for that file doesn't move with it, and hey presto your WAV files are suddenly without their comments and track numbers.

 

Overall the ID3 notion of "every value in its place" is inherited from classical information sciences, where everything can be taxonomically categorized as long as your taxonomy is well-structured and sufficiently comprehensive. This attitude is somewhat antiquated in the current post-folksonomy era, in which plaintext should be considered searchable and it's incumbent on the search tool to filter by context on behalf of the user.

 

In general, the more granular a field is, the easier it is to manage. Song titles, for example, are practically akin to individual file identifiers; to each file its own song title. Album titles are usually easy to classify (album title); not as granular, but they delineate a distinct grouping. Artist names start getting into the weird and hard-to-manage area: How do I manage the artist name fields for Aesop Rock's None Shall Pass in a meaningful way? Track 14, "Coffee", has a guest appearance from John Darnielle. I could add John Darnielle to the track name: "Coffee feat. John Darnielle", but then I can't search the artist fields for appearances by John Darnielle.

 

iTunes provides the Album Artist and Artist Grouping fields. This liberates things a little: Now I can have "Coffee" by Aesop Rock Feat. John Darnielle, and make Aesop Rock the Album Artist, so when I sort by Artist, I get the whole album None Shall Pass, regardless of the exact configuration of the Artist field in any given track. But Apple treats Album Artist as a red-headed stepchild, and doesn't use on it even for multi-artist tracks in its own store.

 

This is a relatively trivial example: ID3 data structure is actively hostile to classical music categorization. It's just too weird to discuss here. Not that I blame the folks working on ID3: The people who design data structures for libraries and other large-scale information systems can't figure out how to manage classical recordings either. May as well punt, I guess.

 

The only worse method is organizing your music by files and folders.

 

If I could use "folk celtic hippie jam trippy weird" as attribute strings for The Incredible String Band's Wee Tam, I would, but nothing'll let me. I can add it to the freeform comment field, but then it's a freeform comment, not a set of keywords with keyword attributes.

 

I've said before that iTunes is the best of a bad bunch with data management, and I'll stand by that. I have about 1,700 albums on my music server taxonomically organized about as best as I can manage, but I gave up really early on doing anything with the Genre tag and stuck with whatever CDDB/Gracenote used by default. So Daft Punk is "Indie Rock" and DJ Shadow is "Electronica"? Sure, whatevs. I'm not fighting that fight any more.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

I feel like a broken record saying this because it's my standard form reply every single time the topic of gaming comes up, but I feel more optimistic about the state of gaming now more than ever. Yes the large studios are putting their money into large and very multiplayer driven experiences, just because they are driven by profit maximisation; they have shareholders to impress after all. Some of their behaviour, including the DLC stuff, is downright unethical.

 

What's happening now is reason for hope, in that there's been a proliferation of increasingly sophisticated about gaming on the net. Gamasutra is to games now what Ars Technica was to PCs in the early 2000s: full of extended, thoughtful pieces from people who had mastered the technological aspects and wanted to go deeper.

 

This leads to no small amount of wankery, but it also to brilliant moments like Ian Bogost's Cow Clicker.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thrak View Post

I think what you want is 'Nested Playlists'.  iTunes does this very well, actually.

 

Nested playlists and smart playlists are great, but without careful grooming they'll start breaking down as you begin throwing more data and files at them. Again, freeform keywording would eliminate the need for a lot of this, since instead of having to create bins for each categorical attribute, you simply seed each file or album with those keywords, and then create the bins on the fly in whatever combination you like.


Edited by ardgedee - 12/10/12 at 3:26pm
post #3308 of 21761
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by driver 8 View Post

I've been debating buying a Neo Geo MVS console for awhile now, but they're all like 5-$600.  the games are a lot cheaper once you have one, though.

 

 

Yeah, MVS stuff is cheaper than AES by a fairly substantial margin. A mint AES system will cost more than a consolized MVS usually, and the games can run upwards of a grand for some of the rarer titles. Thing is, unless you're a collector, it's a bit pointless to get either version since the ROMs [that you totally paid for, Guybrush Threepwood] perform just fine on any computer from the last 15 years, and the choice of sticks is much better in that case. On the other hand, it makes more sense to get a consolized Atomiswave or another more recent arcade board since those are harder to find sources for and harder to emulate in general.

 

That's why the Neo Geo X is so exciting, as one could potentially hook it up to a bigger screen and use the included sticks and basically have a new AES system that uses cheapo cards. Assuming they actually support the thing and release more cards in the future.

 

I will say, there is something utterly delicious about consolized arcade systems. Funny thing is, the AES was pretty much a commercial console arcade system itself too. In either case, the carts are massive. Plugging those suckers in just satisfying. Then you've for the "meg counts" on the sides of the boxes.

 

 

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I own an AES system that I've had since my childhood, along with 15 or so carts for it. I've been wanting to get more, but they're just so damn expensive these days. Going with an MVS system is definitely more economical. Been thinking about it since before going to college, but haven't done it yet, and they're only going to get harder to find with each passing year. Eventually I'd just take the thing apart and use the boards to restore an actual arcade cab.

post #3309 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by compoopers View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

"Death jazz"? Can you YouTube an example?

Usually when I think of Japanese jazz, the first thing that comes to mind are the endless bossa nova albums of Sadao Watanabe and peers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQMgXPFzdg8

I don't know why it's called death jazz. But isn't it popping?

On another topic... I'm having SEVERE tagging/music organizational problems.

I'm trying to tag all my music with the correct genres. However, some songs have multiple genres. For instance a song can be both hip hop and jazz, or both chiptunes and electronic music. However, foobar doesn't seem to want to take my multiple genre tags. And I've yet to find an app for my phone (which I use as music player) that supports multiple genre tagging. Since I don't really use playlists and listen to my music by genre, this is a huge roadblock for me. It's really difficult and it seems like very few people do it the way I do (Genre tags? who cares?) so I haven't had much luck looking it up online.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhoenixClaw View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by compoopers View Post

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQMgXPFzdg8

I don't know why it's called death jazz. But isn't it popping?

 
Since you like jazz made in japan I figure you would like these guys:

Thanks for all the jazz. Never really liked jazz much, but the more I watch anime, the more I found songs like these. I thought it was just my biased japanophile in me; it never occurred to me that it could be its own genre.
post #3310 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

 

That's why the Neo Geo X is so exciting, as one could potentially hook it up to a bigger screen and use the included sticks and basically have a new AES system that uses cheapo cards. Assuming they actually support the thing and release more cards in the future.

 

 

Wait, I thought what you bought was just an AES remake... What are these cards exactly and where does one find them?

 

-Edit-

 

Alright I waded through the site.  Sounds cool.

 

Man, it sucks that there's no MVS or AES flash cart.  If there were I'd buy whichever console had it in a second, but right now that expense for a console I'll still have trouble procuring games for or one that may or may not get reissues of said games seems like a stretch.

 

My compulsion to collect vidcons again, which started a few months ago, is kind of like my head-fi urge where I'll go some distance, but never all the way in any particular direction -- just lots of meandering.

 

I recently ordered NES and SNES flash carts and plan on playing the hell out of old SNES JRPG's I never had access to.


Edited by driver 8 - 12/10/12 at 4:34pm
post #3311 of 21761
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by driver 8 View Post

 

Wait, I thought what you bought was just an AES remake... What are these cards exactly and where does one find them?

 

The Neo Geo X is a handheld system that has a docking station, allowing you to play it on a TV like the original AES with the included controller. The handheld comes preloaded with 20 games, but it also has a card slot letting you play additional games in the future. Only one card has been announced thus far:

 

http://neogeox.com/game-cards

 

It's a pack-in for the limited edition gold system. Hopefully they'll release more games in the future, and this isn't just a once off that loses support in a few months...

post #3312 of 21761
Thread Starter 

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post #3313 of 21761

Yeah, sorry, I should have gone a page back before posting >_>

 

Going back to my edit about the lack of Neo Geo flash carts, I could easily see someone somewhere making one for this thing (since it would be almost all software in terms of work), which would be the mad note.  Hooking my laptop up to the living room TV with 2 TE arcade sticks plugged in for MAME certainly makes the most sense, but it just doesn't feel the same... you know?  And I've encountered a few MAME ROMs with sound issues I don't enjoy. 


Edited by driver 8 - 12/10/12 at 4:33pm
post #3314 of 21761
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by driver 8 View Post

Yeah, sorry, I should have gone a page back before posting >_>

 

Going back to my edit about the lack of Neo Geo flash carts, I could easily see someone somewhere making one of this thing (since it would be almost all software in terms of work), which would be the mad note.  Hooking my laptop up to the living room TV with 2 TE arcade sticks plugged in for MAME certainly makes the most sense, but it just doesn't feel the same... you know?  And I've encountered a few MAME ROMs with sound issues I don't enjoy. 

 

Thing is, a lot of the MVS and AES carts have sound issues too LOL. The company really struggled throughout its history, and sometimes carts were sent off with glitches. The ROMs you find are actually in some cases better, which is very sad.

 

Be very careful when buying consolized hardware. A lot of rip off artists out there selling inferior crap. Only a few places I'd really trust. The cool thing is, you can compromise and get one of those "all in one carts" where it's an AES or MVS cart but with tons of games on it, sometimes hundreds.

post #3315 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by compoopers View Post

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQMgXPFzdg8
I don't know why it's called death jazz. But isn't it popping?

 

Oh, okay, so it's kind of like Crazy Ken Band and other vaguely 60s-inspired jazz pop bands...

 

 

It mixes really well with a little laid-back hip-hop, unsurprisingly...

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