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post #2656 of 21761

I know what you mean lol I thought the same :P. I'm very tempted to get this little combo but I don't think it will be an upgrade and maybe a slight downgrade from my current desktop rig.... :( I wish they had an upgraded version of a stand alone DAC with 24/192 support....
 

post #2657 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomscy2000 View Post

 

Does anyone know where Michael Goodman is from? In all the videos I've seen featuring him, his English contains some kind of eastern European, Slavic-ish twang --- not that there's anything wrong with that, but I thought it was interesting.

 

 

 

Yeah, there are some Slavic intonations ( weak vowels etc.) in his pronunciation. He is probably an eastern European-Russian Jew.

 

Interesting, there is a review in Russian on head-fi.


Edited by mutabor - 11/19/12 at 1:12am
post #2658 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

You can't see the flabby bass with the FR chart, though the recessed treble is rather obvious. If you don't like much treble, that's great, but for my cash I want a $1k set of audiophile headphones to be neutral.
Their often sited "flabby" nature is caused by a couple factors; their transducer design (they're heavier and larger than the "competition") and poor driver control due to low damping factor (amp problem). The first is made worse by the second and this causes nasty impulse response:

Which comes across as muddy bass. Part of this can be remedied by a high voltage, low impedance amp, but some of it can't be fixed.
Anyhow, as this discussion is causing ire, I'll drop it. No reason to irritate the local residents any further.

Thank you for this response.

However, I trust innferfidelitys' measurements more:

Look at stax09s' impulse response:
http://www.innerfidelity.com/images/StaxSR009SZ91278.pdf

And look at lcd2s impulse response:
http://www.innerfidelity.com/images/AudezeLCD2.pdf
or this
http://www.innerfidelity.com/images/AudezeLCD2SN5312123.pdf

The amplifier you choose to make the measurements of orthos is very important indeed.

THe lcd2 has bass from 10Hz and under 1% distortion in the bass area.

Lcd2s bass is one of the best i have heard. With the treble i can give you that it is not one of the best, but the bass is excellent smily_headphones1.gif
Edited by dan.gheorghe - 11/19/12 at 4:37am
post #2659 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by dan.gheorghe View Post

Thank you for this response.

However, ...

 

Dear Dan,

 

please stop defending yourself, the heartfelt joy and enthusiasm that carried your review has been so much more convincing than any expert's graph you'll ever come up with.

 

Ever so often we get caught in a discussion, that turns into an argument, that turns into a pissing match. Take my advice, you need to stop right here and go back to what brought you to head-fi in the first place, the love for your hobby.

post #2660 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomscy2000 View Post

Does anyone know where Michael Goodman is from? In all the videos I've seen featuring him, his English contains some kind of eastern European, Slavic-ish twang --- not that there's anything wrong with that, but I thought it was interesting.




Yeah, there are some Slavic intonations ( weak vowels etc.) in his pronunciation. He is probably an eastern European-Russian Jew.

Interesting, there is a review in Russian on head-fi.

Wow. If I'm not lazy I would surely read that to improve my reading at the very least.
post #2661 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post  Wow. If I'm not lazy I would surely read that to improve my reading at the very least.

 

What are you studying in Russia, BTW? I've always been curious; I knew a Malaysian girl who considered going to Russia for music school, but what're you doing there? Just curious.

post #2662 of 21761
Aviation engineering, but more on control systems. There's quite some things that overlaps with the electronics side of audiophilia I found.

Going to Russia to study music? Interesting.
post #2663 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by james444 View Post

Dear Dan,

please stop defending yourself, the heartfelt joy and enthusiasm that carried your review has been so much more convincing than any expert's graph you'll ever come up with.

Ever so often we get caught in a discussion, that turns into an argument, that turns into a pissing match. Take my advice, you need to stop right here and go back to what brought you to head-fi in the first place, the love for your hobby.

Thanks James444. You are right smily_headphones1.gif

I am not defending myself, or anything else, cause I don't need to, just cannot help myself on answering with logical arguments , but you are right, I already said 2 times i am getting out of this conversation and couldn't help myself.

Another thing I cannot help is trying to get straight some information brought into the discussion which i find misleading or incorrect. ( i am an engineer and I cannot help myself happy_face1.gif )

If somebody wants to continue this discussion let us continue it on private.
Edited by dan.gheorghe - 11/19/12 at 9:23am
post #2664 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by dan.gheorghe View Post

Thanks James444. You are right smily_headphones1.gif
I am not defending myself, or anything else, cause I don't need to, just cannot help myself on answering with logical arguments , but you are right, I already said 2 times i am getting out of this conversation and couldn't help myself.
Another thing I cannot help is trying to get straight some information brought into the discussion which i find misleading or incorrect. ( i am an engineer and I cannot help myself happy_face1.gif )
If somebody wants to continue this discussion let us continue it on private.

If you want to continue the discussion here, feel free.

http://www.head-fi.org/t/600088/an-audiophile-and-petrolheads-musings-a-bloggish-kind-of-thing

I'm not going to pursue it any further in this thread.
post #2665 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post

Aviation engineering, but more on control systems. There's quite some things that overlaps with the electronics side of audiophilia I found.
Going to Russia to study music? Interesting.

Nice!

 

A lot of work in that area! The only "bad" thing is that when you get in, that's basically your whole job. Here we don't have aviation engineering, just electrical, computer, etc. So if you have a computer engineering background, kiss your programming goodbye cause you probably wont use the "usual" languages in an aerospace company, at least not in the highest level... unless you practice at home. So keep that in mind... ;-)

post #2666 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by gelocks View Post

Nice!

A lot of work in that area! The only "bad" thing is that when you get in, that's basically your whole job. Here we don't have aviation engineering, just electrical, computer, etc. So if you have a computer engineering background, kiss your programming goodbye cause you probably wont use the "usual" languages in an aerospace company, at least not in the highest level... unless you practice at home. So keep that in mind... ;-)

I see. Thanks for the heads up. I'll make sure to remember that.
post #2667 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by gelocks View Post

Nice!

A lot of work in that area! The only "bad" thing is that when you get in, that's basically your whole job. Here we don't have aviation engineering, just electrical, computer, etc. So if you have a computer engineering background, kiss your programming goodbye cause you probably wont use the "usual" languages in an aerospace company, at least not in the highest level... unless you practice at home. So keep that in mind... ;-)

Wait - wut? Where's "here?" If it is the US, it is not usually called "aviation engineering", but there is aeronautical engineering & aerospace engineering. A lot of guys doing flight controls are aero or electrical engineers - it usually depends if you are more focused on control of the flight dynamics (aero) or in the design of the avionics boxes themselves (electrical) or in the programming of those boxes (aero or electrical or computer engineering). Then there are the folks that are involved with the actual mechanics of moving the control surfaces (electrical or mechanical or hydraulic engineering) or of the forces, vibrations & material composition of the control surfaces (mechanical or materials or aero), or a dozen other disciplines involved.

As far as the languages & "high level" of the programming used in aircraft - what you are saying is true of the actual avionics boxes, which tend (but not always) to use specialized embedded real-time languages, but there are TONS of other places where coding is done using the latest and greatest of whiz-bang technology - for example, multi-million dollar simulators using banks of CPUs & GPUs to create fluffy clouds and missile vapor trails inside 40 foot domes, or aerodynamic flow visualization models running on hyper-cubed linux clusters. Back in the dark ages (~1998), I was playing with C++, enterprise Java beans, CORBA (precursor to SOA & web services) and some other "new" technology - all while working in the aerospace industry.

I'm not saying there isn't also PLENTY of old tech still running in aerospace - my point is that there is also plenty of new tech too.

When you work in the aerospace industry are you doing sexy web development? No. Are you doing sexy game development? Sort of, but it's just a much bigger game platform and you don't win gold coins and health points... wink.gif
post #2668 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post


Wait - wut? Where's "here?" If it is the US, it is not usually called "aviation engineering", but there is aeronautical engineering & aerospace engineering. A lot of guys doing flight controls are aero or electrical engineers - it usually depends if you are more focused on control of the flight dynamics (aero) or in the design of the avionics boxes themselves (electrical) or in the programming of those boxes (aero or electrical or computer engineering). Then there are the folks that are involved with the actual mechanics of moving the control surfaces (electrical or mechanical or hydraulic engineering) or of the forces, vibrations & material composition of the control surfaces (mechanical or materials or aero), or a dozen other disciplines involved.
As far as the languages & "high level" of the programming used in aircraft - what you are saying is true of the actual avionics boxes, which tend (but not always) to use specialized embedded real-time languages, but there are TONS of other places where coding is done using the latest and greatest of whiz-bang technology - for example, multi-million dollar simulators using banks of CPUs & GPUs to create fluffy clouds and missile vapor trails inside 40 foot domes, or aerodynamic flow visualization models running on hyper-cubed linux clusters. Back in the dark ages (~1998), I was playing with C++, enterprise Java beans, CORBA (precursor to SOA & web services) and some other "new" technology - all while working in the aerospace industry.
I'm not saying there isn't also PLENTY of old tech still running in aerospace - my point is that there is also plenty of new tech too.
When you work in the aerospace industry are you doing sexy web development? No. Are you doing sexy game development? Sort of, but it's just a much bigger game platform and you don't win gold coins and health points... wink.gif

 

I meant in the Country I'm from (U.S. Commonwealth). Aerospace engineering is still not a major/big study branch here.

 

And agree with everything that you are saying regarding the areas and the type of engineers usually employed, but I meant that most of the programming for the engines, control systems, etc. is embedded stuff... (and I doubt we will ever see something different for now...) Since jgray91 mentioned that he is looking into "Control Systems", most of that is low-level, embedded stuff, and Not the latest and greatest. But as you mentioned, yep, there's definitely opportunities in other areas, but if you are going for the control system, you are going to be stuck in the stone age...

 

:-p

post #2669 of 21761
The actual flight control system engineers typically work with software modeling & simulation applications - they aren't doing the embedded coding. The programmers are coding from the design documents created by the flight control system engineers.
post #2670 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

The actual flight control system engineers typically work with software modeling & simulation applications - they aren't doing the embedded coding. The programmers are coding from the design documents created by the flight control system engineers.

 

I take it that the modeling and simulation apps are also "proprietary" software with their own guidelines and requirements and possibly using interfaces (ala IDE's) not really letting you get to the underlying code? (don't know about those ... just wondering.)

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