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The diary entries of a little girl in her 30s! ~ Part 2 - Page 130  

post #1936 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post

Today I finally got around to watching Hunger Games. Not a bad movie and I found it was quite entertaining but I failed to see why people were raving about it so much. Truth be known it reminded me a lot of the old Arnold Schwarzenegger movie Running Man. 

 

I think that Hunger Games are a rip off of the Japanese popular book Battle Royale ( there is the movie also).

 

"Battle Royale, a high-octane thriller about senseless youth violence, is one of Japan's best-selling - and most controversial - novels. As part of a ruthless program by the totalitarian government, ninth-grade students are taken to a small isolated island with a map, food, and various weapons. Forced to wear special collars that explode when they break a rule, they must fight each other for three days until only one "winner" remains. The elimination contest becomes the ultimate in must-see reality television. A Japanese pulp classic available in English for the first time, Battle Royale is a potent allegory of what it means to be young and survive in today's dog-eat-dog world. The first novel by small-town journalist Koushun Takami, it went on to become an even more notorious film by 70-year-old gangster director Kinji Fukusaku."


Edited by mutabor - 10/18/12 at 4:23am
post #1937 of 21760
Thread Starter 

It's just as much a "rip off" of The Most Dangerous Game and Running Man. Or Smash TV. Or gladiator stories.

 

There's nothing new under the sun.

post #1938 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

There's nothing new under the sun.

 

Sure. But the plot of Hunger Games is almost a copy of Battle Royale with very little to add. 

 

Gladiator stories and Running man are pretty different from Hunger Games. 

 

For example, people compare Looper to Terminator. There are some lines in the plot which give them resemblance: a killer from the future comes to the present to kill a child who has a mother called Sara and who will become an influential leader in the future. But in Looper there is so much more going on. The plot is more complex and "Terminator line" is not even main, it's secondary. While in Hunger Games I see basically the same plot as in Battle Royale.


Edited by mutabor - 10/18/12 at 6:00am
post #1939 of 21760

doesn't the Hunger Games series mostly focus on Katniss after winning the games, though?  (I haven't read them, but a friend was telling me a lot about them one night.)

 

Man, a 90's "Japanime" of Smash TV would be pretty dope.

post #1940 of 21760

Why the 'The Hunger Games's Snub of 'Battle Royale' Matters

"Hollywood's next likely blockbuster, The Hunger Games, is set to open this Friday, March 23.  This work is unique from past remakes or adaptations of Asian stories in that its creator denies any knowledge of the classic 1999 Japanese book and movie Battle Royale, with which it shares extraordinary parallels.

Both movies feature a corrupt totalitarian government that places children on an isolated island to fight brutally to the death, until one last winner emerges. They implant tracking devices into the children and fill the island with cameras, which are observed by a control room that airs the competition to the general population. A female protagonist ultimately triumphs with the help of a boy with whom she develops a relationship. Author Suzanne Collins claims she never heard of the Battle Royale book or movie prior to writing The Hunger Games in 2008, and claims that she came up with the ideas independently after watching late night television and clips of the Iraq War. Maybe, maybe not. Collins has already profited handsomely from her Hunger Games trilogy of books, which have been US bestsellers for the past few years. On the other hand, most Americans are unaware of Battle Royale since it was blocked from US distribution until recently. 

This isn't the first time Hollywood has made minor modifications on an Asian story and marketed it as a novel piece of art. Akira is currently being remade and re-set in neo-New York. The screenwriter for The Departed won an Oscar for basically translating the film Infernal Affairs into English, and changing the setting from Hong Kong to Boston. Aside from a few plot and character changes, many of the scenes in The Departed were direct scene-for-scene copies of the Asian film, including literal translations of some jokes. At leastThe Departed gave some credit to Infernal Affairs as a remake and has the excuse of paying homage. Though, a general question remains of the American public’s awareness of how many recent Hollywood films have been remakes of Asian movies, or how even a popular American television show like Wipeout is a remake of the popular decades-long Japanese show. 

Suzanne Collins's claims that Battle Royale had no influence on her books and its film adaptation is a major step back from recent remakes of Asian stories because, in those cases, at least there was a minor acknowledgement to the original characters or stories from which they were adapted. Even in recent whitewashing cases like 21 or The Last Airbender, at least the fans had some knowledge that the original characters in the films were Asian. Collins' claims sound even more hollow when comparisons can be made in exact movie scenes between the two films. The film review community has also done a disservice by downplaying this issue. Most mainstream reviews I have read do not acknowledge any Battle Royale influence in The Hunger Games, and those who do mention the film deliberately bundle it with other movies like Running Man in order to gloss over the striking similarities toBattle Royale. Other reviews strain unconvincingly to explain how dissimilar the two films are. I find the coverage especially hypocritical given the same film community's heavy criticism of Justin Lin's previous Annapolis movie release, which critics blasted for its similarities with past works."


Edited by mutabor - 10/18/12 at 6:23am
post #1941 of 21760

I liked the Battle Royale movie.

 

Never saw/read hunger games though.

post #1942 of 21760

I liked Battle Royale as well. I didn't exactly enjoy Hunger Games but it was a "feel-good" movie and a pleasant watch.

 

I just watched Looper today. The acting and soundtrack were superb. I didn't like the story though. I can never really like movies with time travel because you're basically left with a lot of questions.

post #1943 of 21760
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post

 

Sure. But the plot of Hunger Games is almost a copy of Battle Royale with very little to add. 

 

Gladiator stories and Running man are pretty different from Hunger Games. 

 

For example, people compare Looper to Terminator. There are some lines in the plot which give them resemblance: a killer from the future comes to the present to kill a child who has a mother called Sara and who will become an influential leader in the future. But in Looper there is so much more going on. The plot is more complex and "Terminator line" is not even main, it's secondary. While in Hunger Games I see basically the same plot as in Battle Royale.

 

Actually, there are definite similarities between Hunger Games and Running Man.

 

As for gladiator stories, I fail to see how they're that much different. It's the origin of the "killing for the sport / spectators" theme in the West more or less. You can combine that with the hunter themes from, say, Lord of the Flies and The Most Dangerous Game and you basically have Battle Royale. There was nothing revolutionary there.

 

I'm always amused when someone tries to make a federal case about something popular "ripping off" something else that is, itself, a popular "rip off." Like people who bash Harry Potter for ripping off Lord of the Rings. In this case however, it's especially obnoxious when you have people trying to lump cultural appropriation onto it, trying to argue that these are somehow Asian themes and precedents despite their appearing across different cultures under different guises. Seems a lot of people on the Internet specifically, themselves Westerners, want to believe everything good and original comes from Japan, something you see time and again when people try to argue X or Y was a ripoff of some anime.


Edited by MuppetFace - 10/18/12 at 7:01am
post #1944 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post

Sure. But the plot of Hunger Games is almost a copy of Battle Royale with very little to add. 

 

As much as I love Battle Royale, I've never really bought into the 'Hunger Games is a rip of BR' argument. The idea of throwing people into a gladiator ring for entertainment is not particularly novel, and putting children into the situation isn't much of a stretch of the imagination. Besides Running Man I would suggest Lord of the Flies as thematically similar but structurally different in plot.

 

I think BR and the Hunger Games differ most in the actual themes of the movie. Battle Royale really asks the question with Kitano's character, how do we deal with children in society when it seems like the social contract between adults and children is disintegrating? What example do we provide children, when they begin to mirror our worst impulses?

 

The Hunger Games (or at least the movie, since I haven't read the book) is more a socio-political commentary which suggests that reality television is the elite's way of entrenching existing power structures by offering them spectacle and a drip feed of hope. It's less about the interaction between adults and children, because essentially none of the young characters in the Hunger Games act like anything less than adults / sociopaths.

 

Superficially they resemble each other, but I think they are fairly different in intent and effect. The Hunger Games is a fun narrative romp, but it doesn't emulate the macabre starkness of Battle Royale and doesn't try to either.

post #1945 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post
Most mainstream reviews I have read do not acknowledge any Battle Royale influence in The Hunger Games, and those who do mention the film deliberately bundle it with other movies like Running Man in order to gloss over the striking similarities toBattle Royale. ... I find the coverage especially hypocritical given the same film community's heavy criticism of Justin Lin's previous Annapolis movie release, which critics blasted for its similarities with past works."

It's entirely conceivable that most mainstream reviewers are unaware of Battle Royale.  That makes the hypocracy cry a bit overly dramatic.

post #1946 of 21760

Quote:

Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

Actually, there are definite similarities between Hunger Games and Running Man.

 

As for gladiator stories, I fail to see how they're that much different. It's the origin of the "killing for the sport / spectators" theme in the West more or less. You can combine that with the hunter themes from, say, Lord of the Flies and The Most Dangerous Game and you basically have Battle Royale. There was nothing revolutionary there.

 

I'm always amused when someone tries to make a federal case about something popular "ripping off" something else that is, itself, a popular "rip off." Like people who bash Harry Potter for ripping off Lord of the Rings. In this case however, it's especially obnoxious when you have people trying to lump cultural appropriation onto it, trying to argue that these are somehow Asian themes and precedents despite their appearing across different cultures under different guises. Seems a lot of people on the Internet specifically, themselves Westerners, want to believe everything good and original comes from Japan, something you see time and again when people try to argue X or Y was a ripoff of some anime.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vuroth View Post

It's entirely conceivable that most mainstream reviewers are unaware of Battle Royale.  That makes the hypocracy cry a bit overly dramatic.


The question is really a matter of whether or not the author truly knew nothing of Battle Royale. As to whether or not it is possible, I don't know. You'd think BR, at the very least, makes its way around authors circles. I basically agree with MF though, in regards to Japanophiles. It's not always the case though; in regards to the Matrix, the Wachowski's have been very honest about Ghost in the Shell's [the film's] influence.

post #1947 of 21760

As far as the Hunger Games is concerned, I saw more similarities with Bob Sheckley's old sci-fi story "The Seventh Victim" (which itself was turned into the movie "The 10th Victim" in the 1960's), than anything else. Speaking of sci-fi stories, does anyone here read David Weber's Honor Harrington books? Honor is a very fun character to read about.

post #1948 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by 333jeffery View Post

As far as the Hunger Games is concerned, I saw more similarities with Bob Sheckley's old sci-fi story "The Seventh Victim" (which itself was turned into the movie "The 10th Victim" in the 1960's), than anything else. Speaking of sci-fi stories, does anyone here read David Weber's Honor Harrington books? Honor is a very fun character to read about.

I've 'read' of Honor Harrington only from TVTropes on one of the very black-holey romp across it. Thanks to 26 tabs and 6 hours later I can't remember any of the spoilers.
post #1949 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

 

Actually, there are definite similarities between Hunger Games and Running Man.

 

As for gladiator stories, I fail to see how they're that much different. It's the origin of the "killing for the sport / spectators" theme in the West more or less. You can combine that with the hunter themes from, say, Lord of the Flies and The Most Dangerous Game and you basically have Battle Royale. There was nothing revolutionary there.

 

I'm always amused when someone tries to make a federal case about something popular "ripping off" something else that is, itself, a popular "rip off." Like people who bash Harry Potter for ripping off Lord of the Rings. In this case however, it's especially obnoxious when you have people trying to lump cultural appropriation onto it, trying to argue that these are somehow Asian themes and precedents despite their appearing across different cultures under different guises. Seems a lot of people on the Internet specifically, themselves Westerners, want to believe everything good and original comes from Japan, something you see time and again when people try to argue X or Y was a ripoff of some anime.

 

LOL. It reminds me hot debates whether or not Samsung have stolen iPhone's design in case of their smartphones and tablets. Some say that rip off is obvious others ( usually Samsung users and Apple haters) say that there is no rip off because all smartphones have rectangular shapes and you can't patent a rectangular shape. Some say that Apple themselves ripped off someone else's design because "nothing is new under the sun".


Edited by mutabor - 10/18/12 at 9:32am
post #1950 of 21760
Calling something a rip-off to something else always end up badly, IME. I want to chime in, but since I've never seen Hunger Games (except across airplane seat aisles) and I've forgotten about BR (other than it's a class of students forced to kill each other to get off the island), anything I said would be noise.
Also, I've been waiting for the Nexus 7 to launch the 32GB variant before I jump on one, but then, I remembered that it can support USB on-the-go. This means that it supposedly can read my 500GB external portable HDD. This also means that whenever I plunk down to watch any anime, I could just connect them together, make a makeshift stand for it, and not worried about space. I just realised this now, and I felt kind of stupid.

But still, I'm waiting for the 32GB variant so that I can get the 16GB one at a cheaper price. Still got to watch anime on the subway!! ph34r.gif
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