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The diary entries of a little girl in her 30s! ~ Part 2 - Page 1271

post #19051 of 21420

Man why does hifi equipment have to sound so much better after midnight, honestly it sounds considerably better, and I am just listening to some redbook album buried deep on my hard drive.  Maybe it's a great recording, I will have to listen tomorrow.  One of those "nothing is missing" type of hifi experiences.  It's fine and all but it's not really convenient to do listening so late...

post #19052 of 21420
Quote:
Originally Posted by drez View Post

Man why does hifi equipment have to sound so much better after midnight, honestly it sounds considerably better, and I am just listening to some redbook album buried deep on my hard drive.  Maybe it's a great recording, I will have to listen tomorrow.  One of those "nothing is missing" type of hifi experiences.  It's fine and all but it's not really convenient to do listening so late...

You're likely dealing with much lower ambient noise and can probably hear a greater dynamic range as a result. Just a partial possible explanation. I like listening in the dead of night too.
post #19053 of 21420
Thanks for responding guys.
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

vwinter, I'm not actually sure what you are getting at :s But here's what I can say from my understanding of your statement.

I don't think everyone understands their motivations completely, and I agree that being reductionist about it is not going to be particularly useful. But it might be interesting. Personally I don't think it's worth getting caught up too much in navel gazing about our hobby, but it helps to take a step back and say that, chyea, it's all a bit crazy. But we get something out of it, until we don't. And yes everything I just said was very facile and general.

One of the things about any meeting place where a bunch of people regularly talk and philosophise is that at some point we will contradict each other, contradict ourselves, make retractions and apologise and generally talk crap. Because it's safe and everyone is comfortable enough with each other's viewpoints and respects everyone's intelligence.

One of the amusing aspects about this thread is that I think about 25% of the time we talk about what we should talk about in the thread. That is seriously meta folks.

I wasn't getting anywhere in regard to you. You just happened to be there in MF's post and I just went with it. That's why "sorry a_rec."

I'm still trying to figure out where I was going myself. Your responses are helping with that a great deal actually. I've almost forgotten my path on that statement already tbh =/

I agree with everything you said. I'm not sure it directly responds to what I was saying but I don't think it was really meant to either.

... I could have sworn your post had some more stuff in there when I first read it. Anyway,

Maybe I was just being selfish in that I felt if we're going to discuss motivations and causes, that whenever I see it in this thread, it feels superficial at best and I'd just like more. Maybe I just don't want to accept that something like self fulfillment or thrill and excitement is the main catalyst. With something like self fulfillment, it's too far removed. For example, what's the missing part that these actions address, and to that end, what was the initial junction point that created this void. And with thrill or excitement, it's too... convenient, too top layer. Why? Why is that urge there? If I'm going to try to understand people, I want to understand them, not think or pretend I do with broad strokes. Like I said, maybe it's selfish, but anything else feels like a waste. And for a reason I haven't figured out yet, it's frustrating.

Edit: please note if it's not obvious that these are more my feelings than my perception of "truths" or argumentative points.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

A continuation of the previous subject, and my exhausting myself...
A lot of interesting stuff (Click to show)
First touching on something a_recording said, all behavior has motivation behind it, but what I'm describing in this hobby isn't exactly reductionism. The reductionist would say something more akin to "we buy headphones because they trigger a release of pleasurable chemicals in the brain" or "we argue on the forums to assert our dominance." The reductionist has little use for nebulous and obtuse notions like self-fulfillment. On the contrary, I embrace the notion that we're complex and multifaceted enough to where reductionism is often missing the forest for the trees so to speak. I may be describing motivation, drives, and generalized behavior, but it's not my intention to reduce the individual to a mere packet of these things. Nor is it my intention to divide people into starkly delineated groups as in a binary based on those who hype things and those who rail against hyping things (I assume this is what is meant by "different samples"). I'm not talking about specific groups of people, but rather tendencies that are not mutually exclusive and cut across groups at one point or another, a social model with many facets to it. Overall, I'm a bit confused regarding vwinter's objections because he seems to be suggesting that the discussion of behaviors on the forum is fruitless, yet on the other hand repeatedly uses the term "cop-out" which suggests the failure to meet some sort of obligation to adequately do so. Personally I don't think it's remotely a cop-out to talk about self-fulfillment as a motivation that underlies human behavior. I don't think it's a simplification to say that at the heart of all our endeavors there's a desire for happiness. Perhaps in a more contemporary sense happiness has a cheap connotation---we tend to think of it as synonymous with physical pleasure---but historically it meant something much closer to wholeness or completeness as a person. Obtaining this was the original goal of Western philosophy. This is also as good a place as any to point out that I'm not saying these behaviors actually lead to self fulfillment either. To my mind it's more a matter of human beings striving for self fulfillment, and this hobby becoming a vector of sorts toward that end; any fulfillment someone derives from consumerism or online roleplaying is, at best, temporary and ultimately fleeting. That's why the striving continues unabated, why I refer to it in cyclical terms.

The question then is why bother to describe these things in the first place? In vwinter's posts there's skepticism over any large scale change being affected through recognition of all this, and I pretty much agree with such sentiments. It was never really my intention to suggest reforms for the system. I actually think it serves its purpose, functions differently for different people but effectively enough. If folks weren't doing what they were doing on head-fi, they'd be doing it on bicycle-fi or telescope-fi. Why talk about it, then? Well on the most rudimentary level my explanation is "because I like talking about it." Motivation, desire, habits, belief... it's something interesting to discuss even if there's no express practicality in doing so. Talking about this hobby on a meta-analytical level is part of this thread's culture. Another part of that culture is relating our personal experiences, and as individuals posting on the forum we inevitably have some kind of relationship to the larger symbolic order at work therein. That's why I say I post in a "semi-vacuum," because even if I keep to this thread, I'm not really outside of the symbolic order so long as I'm posting here in any capacity. It's something that predates my presence here, something I entered into when I signed up to post here several years ago. It predates most of us, it's formed by peoples' shaping a society en miniature around common interests, and it's perpetuated by a network of various desires and roles. Every post we make is within that larger context. It provides a common language of sorts for us to discuss our personal experiences here even if we aren't fully aware of it. When I brought up this rigamarole in the first place, it was to cite why hype isn't so bothersome *to me* these days.

As I stated before, I also feel there's benefit in recognizing these cycles and patterns of behavior both in others and ourselves. It can effect how one approaches this hobby, how one relates to others of the forums, how one prioritizes and plans purchases. I'm not sure I'd agree that everyone enjoys spending money, as I've known some individuals who become physically ill when they do so; there are individuals who prefer the security of holding on to it. Even assuming that were the case, I think it's safe to say we all don't necessarily enjoy spending it in the same way and for the same reasons. Sometimes we aren't aware of what those reasons are. Whether or not you agree with it, I don't think the idea itself is particularly alien: as humans we can lose touch with the motivations behind what we do, and sometimes we find ourselves in a state of frustration or unhappiness because we're engaging in a particular behavior without any context for it, or we find ourselves acting in a way completely contrary to what we actually want. This isn't just something I've pulled out of my rear end either (though there are plenty of other things I say that could qualify), as I've talked to people over the years who were unhappy or feeling burned out or confused as to what direction they should take, people who invest a lot of time and effort getting to a particular point only to realize they're still not satisfied with what they have. I actually fit this description myself back before I gained an appreciation for the song and dance itself, before I realized much of my enjoyment was derived from the actual pursuit and from the experience of trying new things. Sometimes others shy away from embracing these sentiments because they're perceived as consumerist and frivolous, as being antithetical to so-called hardcore audiophilia. They drift from one big ticket item to the next in the hopes of finding "it," that special something they feel is missing in their lives, often putting a lot of stock in the next big thing, the next peak on a mountain range that never ends. As soon as they get it however, it is no longer "it." The hype and fervor is often just a byproduct of this process, the manic upswing that results from a perceived end to a journey that will inevitably start back up again. When people seem especially keen on convincing you of a product's superiority, it often seems as thought they're really trying to convince themselves of this fact.

To reiterate, I don't find anything particularly wrong with the process itself. Really the trouble comes in when folks don't recognize it for what it is, both in themselves and in others, and put too much faith in sources whose motivations and preferences are largely unknown to them. Before I was more familiar with the forum landscape, I made several costly mistakes and ended up with major cases of buyer's remorse. Hype can indeed be a dangerous thing when folks like the 'silent majority' (ie. lurkers) turn to it to try to suss out definitive answers. These days however I can embrace the fervor and excitement without depending upon it in any deeply informative sense. For that sort of thing, I consider myself fortunate to know individuals whose tastes I can calibrate to my own, persons with experience I've come to rely on for well informed opinions. I'm not looking for applause. Nor is a_rec I imagine (though perhaps he wants to reenact the original ending from Evangelion...). The reward doesn't come from social recognition that we figured out some secret, but rather from our being able to enjoy our hobby without any false pretenses. Not better, not worse. Just different. On the other hand some individuals just want a stable solution, and for them the cycle of consumption is something to be avoided altogether. Recognizing it for what it is then is an important step in breaking free or avoiding it entirely. That just seems like common sense to me. On the other hand---as I've admitted in the past---I tend to have an unfortunate psychoanalytic bent, and I think making 'forgotten' or 'hidden' motivations known can alleviate pressure in and of itself.

We're all participating in a common network when we involve ourselves in this hobby in any social capacity, something that extends from the terminology we use to the way we comport ourselves to memes and rituals at meets. We come to develop a certain identity through that participation. Being a prolific reviewer or a vocal critic are two roles in that sense. Perhaps they stem from a genuine desire to help people, or maybe it has to do with a desire to appear knowledgeable and credible. Whatever the motivation underlying it, I'm not really interested these days in participating, but despite that I generally don't begrudge others who want to do it. There are some exceptions however. I know of one manufacturer who is an upstanding person, runs an honest business, and makes what I feel to be genuinely great products, yet he is currently under attack from someone well-known in this hobby who always uses a false banner of accountability to further his own agenda; said person nitpicks and blows things out of proportion, distorts facts and figures in such a way as to make it seem as though the products he attacks are unsafe and their manufacturers are unscrupulous. He's fashioned himself into a veritable messiah figure over the years, so he strives to maintain the fantasy at all costs. This is why I say it's the other side of the coin to consumerism, because people often use such roles for self satisfaction. I feel it's something to watch out for just as much, if not moreso, because it often comes under false pretenses that are far more insidious than those of zealous consumers. Again: an extreme example. Most of the time it's harmless enough, and at times it's even sincere I'm sure. In either case, I find the social entanglements fascinating but often beside the point when it comes to my enjoyment of various pieces of gear. Plenty of hyped gear is genuinely good. A lot of good gear is genuinely overrated. I often try to bracket off the surrounding context, but that's not entirely possible, and at the end of the day I've just replaced it with my own context that is partially interwoven with the old.

It's kind of surreal to be talked to, about, and around at the same time, like I'm a ghost.

This is more than I expected and it jumps around a bit so please give me some time to respond as life just got a little hectic for me. =(
Edited by vwinter - 10/12/13 at 8:28am
post #19054 of 21420
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vwinter View Post
 
It's kind of surreal to be talked to, about, and around at the same time, like I'm a ghost.

 

Sorry if it weirds you out, but I was referencing your post in an academic way (ie. "in X, Y, Z et. al. it states ...") which is actually a sign of respect. It's also the least awkward way I know of addressing your points directly while talking to everyone and not just you. It's sort of my way of inviting conversation rather than making it seem like a closed two-way discussion.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by vwinter View Post
 
that whenever I see it in this thread, it feels superficial at best and I'd just like more.

 

I personally think this is one of the least superficial threads on head-fi.

 

Which is actually part of the problem to my mind. The more you try to be deep, the more you're actually mounting an escape from the often very real significance of that superficiality. Your saying my explanation is too convenient and "top layer" implies there's some sort of gnostic pneuma behind everything. This is actually wonderful, because it ties directly in to something I posted a while back about art and supposed depth:

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/626954/the-diary-entries-of-a-little-girl-who-is-now-30-part-2/17970#post_9768976

 

People by nature construct identities for themselves through social interactions, through participation in the symbolic order. Why? Because there's no alternative. We "have to" participate in the symbolic order if we want to communicate. Self-fulfillment is something every human strives for because the most fundamental thing we need in life---more fundamental than food, water, shelter---is meaning. We need some kind of meaning to our lives. A meaningless life is a life not worth living. Obviously we don't have to find that meaning on head-fi, it's just one small facet and an optional one at that. I think a lot of folks try to find meaning in consumption however, be it headphones or bicycles or telescopes.

 

The "void" you speak of is the human being his or herself. Behind the mask we construct for ourselves, Zizek would say there is nothing. Only void. I'm not so sure. However I do know there is at the very least a void within us even if it's not all encompassing. We try to fill it with meaning, to be complete.


Edited by MuppetFace - 10/12/13 at 9:18am
post #19055 of 21420
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

Sorry if it weirds you out, but I was referencing your post in an academic way (ie. "in X, Y, Z et. al. it states ...") which is actually a sign of respect. It's also the least awkward way I know of addressing your points directly while talking to everyone and not just you. It's sort of my way of inviting conversation rather than making it seem like a closed two-way discussion.

No no, I appreciate it. Nothing negative meant. I was just describing a new experience for myself, almost like a first impression.
post #19056 of 21420
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post
 

 

It looks to be very much in the same spirit as the original T50, which was a big ol' open headphone.

Wow that looks so much better than the current model, which is hideous.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drez View Post
 

Man why does hifi equipment have to sound so much better after midnight, honestly it sounds considerably better, and I am just listening to some redbook album buried deep on my hard drive.  Maybe it's a great recording, I will have to listen tomorrow.  One of those "nothing is missing" type of hifi experiences.  It's fine and all but it's not really convenient to do listening so late...

You may also be having power quality issues. After midnight there are very few people dirtying up your power. Have you tried a power conditioner? It will do absolutely nothing for you if you already have clean power, but if the power in your area is poor then it can make a dramatic difference.

post #19057 of 21420
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post
 

And here's the XC....

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 100

 

Best part? Different wood choices. Looks like wooden candies....

 

 

Make me think of the TH900. And then the blond cover makes me think of the D1000. I don't know what to think.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post
 

Prototype for the new Fostex ortho spotted...

 

...and that particular photo made me think of the SR-009.

 

It's like there's a convergence in high-end headphone styling.

post #19058 of 21420

So how does the XC sound 

post #19059 of 21420
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post
 

There were several versions of the T50 from the 70s to early 80s along with a whole host of OEM models. I have the NAD RP18 which is one such OEM based on the T50, probably one of the first spin offs, only it has Mylar diaphragm instead of the Kapton which seemed more common (and bassier?). They look pretty much identical to the picture I posted above. In stock form they sound a bit dull in that vintage sort of way---great mids but kinda "splorchy" bass and lack of high-end extension---but modded they become insane.

 

I've also got a pair of the Akai ASE-50. They're quite purdy:

 

 

They're kind of a Frankenphone, a combination of the T50 and T30 from what I understand (the magnets from one, diaphragm from the other). Haven't modded them yet, as in stock form they've got a rather curious signature, kinda warm and honky but pleasant. I may just leave 'em be since they're so rare. Speaking of which, I also have Kabeer's Aiwa HP-500. Only like two or three of these things have ever been documented in the wild. I believe the magnets are the same as the T50s, and the diaphragm is like the Sansui SS-100's which is likely another Fostex OEM as it has a similar voice coil (but the T30's diaphragm material).

 

Phew. Kinda confusing.

 

But the Aiwas sound amazing, easily one of the best vintage orthos I've ever heard, pretty much comparable to the LCD-2 and best modded T50RPs out there.

 

 

All info and pictures courtesy of Wikiphonia.

Ahh that explains the Sansui thingy I saw on Yahoo Auctions the other day........ 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I think It went for 10 dollars...... Eeep  :( If I knew it was rare....... 
post #19060 of 21420

^ whut.

.

You sure it wasn't a Pioneer they look near identical.

silver, round, large, 100 in the nameplate?

 

this?

Created with GIMP


Edited by nick n - 10/12/13 at 11:02pm
post #19061 of 21420
Quote:
Originally Posted by nick n View Post
 

^ whut.

.

You sure it wasn't a Pioneer they look near identical.

silver, round, large, 100 in the nameplate?

 

this?

Created with GIMP

saw that as well but 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
no one bought them.....
post #19062 of 21420

no one bought the Pioneers I suspect lol

 

Those are Sansui SS-100 in that picture.

 In moments like that, Wikiphonia is your best friend :)

 

Do partake next time. There's ALWAYS a next time

post #19063 of 21420
Thread Starter 

The Sansui SS-100 is fairly "eh" in terms of sound, but it looks really nice, so it's popular. Last auction for one I saw it go for like 700 USD which is insane. Usually it goes for around $300-400, which is still sort of insane.

 

Sansui made a few different models, and there are some other makes that look similar.

post #19064 of 21420
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueangel2323 View Post
 

You may also be having power quality issues. After midnight there are very few people dirtying up your power. Have you tried a power conditioner? It will do absolutely nothing for you if you already have clean power, but if the power in your area is poor then it can make a dramatic difference.

 

I think I will need to change up power cords or use a distributer in the future so a power conditioner might work very well.  Same album now sounds ordinary, blurry and grainy.  I might also try a few more shunt filters around the place to see if I can avoid in-series power filtering.  I had a suspicion it might be power, so I think it's worth looking into (I can make shunt filters from $15 worth of components so not much risk there).

 

EDIT: I thnk i figured it out - the sunf filter I was using on the hifi circuit seems to have been doing more harm that good.  No idea why.


Edited by drez - 10/13/13 at 2:13am
post #19065 of 21420
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post
 

The Sansui SS-100 is fairly "eh" in terms of sound, but it looks really nice, so it's popular. Last auction for one I saw it go for like 700 USD which is insane. Usually it goes for around $300-400, which is still sort of insane.

 

Sansui made a few different models, and there are some other makes that look similar.

Ohh that explains a lot :P 

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