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post #1906 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

are there any tracks that you guys and gals listen to that you know you probably shouldn't like so much, but for inexplicable (or perhaps explicable) reasons, love a lot?

I don't believe much in guilty pleasures, music-wise. You can't really control what pushes your buttons.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 333jeffery View Post

Anyone here actually like the movie Prometheus? The reviews of it are so polarized, I can't tell if these folks saw the same film or not.

I found it stupid and annoying, and irritated that I spent money to watch it. I was online in the theater until the movie was over. That's right, I would rather have gotten work done than watch the movie. Smartphones ftw.

In other news: Hangul is the best writing system. This is according to experts from all over the world assembled at the invitation of a retired Korean dignitary.
post #1907 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

 

 

Anyway, I thought I would ask: are there any tracks that you guys and gals listen to that you know you probably shouldn't like so much, but for inexplicable (or perhaps explicable) reasons, love a lot?

 

 

Yes KPOP ph34r.gif I have no idea why I like it but I do ^^ 

post #1908 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

I don't believe much in guilty pleasures, music-wise. You can't really control what pushes your buttons.

 

Hmm.. I don't mean guilty pleasures so much as wondering... 'why do I like this so much?'

post #1909 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post


I couldn't get past the first 20 minutes. These are supposed to be scientists?

 

Exactly what I thought when I saw the film, very derp for academics.  The pseudo intellectual content/themes was grating.  I'm completely fine with films being completely non-intellectual, childish, cliched etc. and I can enjoy these films but for some reason I took aversion to Prometheus.

Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

Lately I've been repeatedly listening to a particular track from the (children's?) cartoon Adventure Time, where Marceline the Vampire Queen  sings about a sad episode in her childhood where her father ate her fries, even though she bought them and they were hers.

 

Anyway, I thought I would ask: are there any tracks that you guys and gals listen to that you know you probably shouldn't like so much, but for inexplicable (or perhaps explicable) reasons, love a lot?

 

Bonus points if these tracks reveal some element of your character that you would be otherwise unaware of or unwilling to admit! :D (The Fry Song obviously points towards some hook up I have about my father duh.)

 

Anything by Marilyn Manson, I shouldn't like it but its just so catchybiggrin.gif


Edited by drez - 10/17/12 at 5:46am
post #1910 of 21760
Thread Starter 

77 BoaDrum

 

 

On July 7th, 2007 the founding fathers (and mother) of the Japanese Noise Scene held a free concert under the Brooklyn Bridge. They recruited seventy-seven drummers from around the world, from various bands, and arranged them in a spiral pattern cascading outward from a center which consisted of the core unit of Boredoms (four drummers, including Yoshimi P-Wee who is referenced in the Flaming Lips album title, and frontman eYe Yamataka). The concert lasted for something like two hours, and the above clip is taken from the first half, known as "Seven" (the second half is called "Sun Loard" [sic]).

 

eYe conducted the proceeding using DJ equipment such as mixers and mics, shouting into them and manipulating his voice. He also uses samples from former Boredoms guitarist Seiichi Yamamoto of the band Omoide Hatoba (one of my all time favorite bands). Additionally, eYe "plays" a special instrument of his own invention called the Sevena, a seven-necked guitar (which can be seen in the video if you look carefully).

 

 

 

 

This concert was truly one-of-a-kind. A documentary and professional recording was released, and as a lifelong Boredoms fan, it represents something of a crowning achievement of the band for me. Having seen them play live several times, I can attest first hand to the energy these guys can conjure. eYe is something of a modern-day shaman; there's a presence about him that is irreducible to descriptors. An almost frighting intensity, but in a positive sense. He exudes the stuff of life.

 

The spiral pattern in particular was an elaboration of eYe's curious metaphysics. By expanding outward, it's meant to subsume the listener as the 78th member of the ritual, sucking the audience into a vortex of sorts. This is why Boredoms prefers to play in the center of a venue rather than on stage in front of listeners; the central loci projects their sonic energy outward toward the listeners on all sides, and in turn all the listeners project their vital energy inward toward the band, concentrating it. There's a drawing on my bedroom wall done by eYe circa 2005. It depicts a group of otherworldly figures in a ring, hands interlocked, and a sun is coalescing in the center.

 

On August 8th, 2008 they held a follow up called 88 BoaDrum. As you can probably guess, this consisted of eighty-eight drummers. This time however there were two sets of 88 drummers and two separate concerts. The one in New York was conducted by the noise rock band Gang Gang Dance, whereas the Boredoms oversaw the Las Angeles performance at the La Brea tar pits. People at the New York location were reportedly upset because they expected the Boredoms to be there. The concerts were, however, free.

 

In 2009 the Boredoms continued to put on some truly amazing concerts. These however weren't free. The first of note was held on a cruise in the middle of the Pacific Ocean during a solar eclipse. This seems especially fitting, as eYe is something of a sun worshiper and solar activity features prominently in his personal mythology. Additionally the theme of the ocean ties into a past performance in which they set up their [hopefully all acoustic] gear on a beach as the tide came rolling in, what served as the inspiration for their Seadrum album. The sea is the primordial womb of humanity, and the sun is the life-giving apex. As far as I know, no footage exists of this particular event.

 

So following their previous trend, a third concert entitled BoaDrum 9 was held in New York at Terminal 5 on September 9th, 2009. Nine drummers were implemented this time around, and considering the concert was held indoors, using ninety-nine drummers was pretty much impossible. Still, the performance itself contained an added dimension of kinetic set pieces, with the drummers positioned on platforms throughout the room like kings sitting atop thrones. The platforms were mobile, and the audience was tasked with carrying them (a la a stage diver) over their collective mass to the center stage where they were installed with the rest of the group.

 

2010 saw several performances of the core Boredoms group, including two at All Tomorrow's Parties. It's a year which seemed to be more about traveling and exposure for the Boredoms rather than pushing boundaries or staging a spectacle. On October 10th, they played under the banner of the Melbourne International Arts Festival. During this time, the band seems to have become all the more comfortable revisiting their past noise-rock-punk works, playing older material that was produced as a more "traditional" band (insofar as you can call Boredoms traditional), and essentially translating it into their new format. Here's a bit of their new rendition of the Super AE album, what I consider to be one of the greatest albums of the 90s:

 

 

2011 saw some new material debuting at Tokyo's "All Be Your Mirror" festival. The performance consisted of six drummers and dronescapes controlled by eYe using motion sensors. Similar devices have been implemented in eYe's performances in the past, and I recall one concert in LA where he used two custom built spheroid remote controls to summon a wall of droning synths; by moving the spheres along a different axis he could manipulate the playback of these samples. They also glowed in response to his movements with flashing LEDs, and the overall effect was mesmerizing.

 

So what about this year? The band played 2012's All Tomorrow's Parties, this time with fourteen guitarists and five drummers. The event was curated by Neutral Milk Hotel's Jeff Mangum.

 

All of this probably seems like a gimmick to some people. I would strongly disagree, however. What Boredoms do these days is performance art in its truest sense. These live performances are event-level (in the Badiouian sense) experiences. They can change your life. There's something about the interactivity of such an event that goes back to humanity's early tribal days, a communal celebration in which the individual becomes part of an emergent whole greater than the sum of its parts, yet still retains a distinct place in an irreducible multiplicity. With their Vision Creation Newsun album, Boredoms transmogrified into a new form, becoming something of a cosmic drum circle which exists beyond the studio. Since that time, the only releases by Boredoms have been either remixes of previously recorded material, side-projects, or live recordings of their incredible performances. As a fan of the group this can be frustrating; eYe has more or less stated that no new full-length album will be coming any time soon. He seems perplexed as to what he'd even put on such an album. Boredoms exist now in live form, and attempts to reify their performances ultimately result in failure. YouTube videos are akin to attempts to photograph the sun with a handheld camera. The massive swarths of percussion and waves of drone simply overwhelm the device and push everything into the distorted, screeching, pounding red. Even professional recordings of such events (like the official 77BoaDrum documentary) ultimately fail in the end, as the vibes of such live performances simply can't be captured and contained.

 

Hopefully I can see one of their performances again next year.


Edited by MuppetFace - 10/17/12 at 6:26am
post #1911 of 21760
Being very honest, when I started that SuperAE clip you provided, I expected that a Powerpuff Girls episode is about to start. tongue.gif

More to the point, those concerts sound like amazing things. And from the clips you gave, I seem to like it. If I were to try more of Boredoms, what would you recommend MF?
post #1912 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post


Anyway, I thought I would ask: are there any tracks that you guys and gals listen to that you know you probably shouldn't like so much, but for inexplicable (or perhaps explicable) reasons, love a lot?

Bonus points if these tracks reveal some element of your character that you would be otherwise unaware of or unwilling to admit! biggrin.gif (The Fry Song obviously points towards some hook up I have about my father duh.)

Oh recently I've been loving music derived from Touhou. I don't even play the game. I tried to once, before I got stomped by the bullets. But really all the different iterations of just the 13 main theme songs for the characters, especially the electronic genre ones, just seem so very amazing.
post #1913 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post


Bad science just messes up my suspension of disbelief too much. There was one epidemic movie where they had a portable electron microscope in a van and it was supposed to be in the 1990s. The rest of the movie? I don't even remember.

 

Well... if you want "science", go to an University, watch a science channel or work R&D somewhere interesting... biggrin.gif

 

But seriously,  I jut want to be entertained when I watch a movie. I USUALLY never look to see if the science is correct (especially on science fiction... come on... FICTION... name says it all... unless it's like a period drama or something historic, I don't look much into details...) or a machine is working exceeding its capabilities, etc. (for example, when I saw Live Free or Die Hard and saw the F35 - Lightning II performing almost as a helicopter, I almost crapped my pants laughing, knowing WELL that it is not possible BUT I loved that part... it was entertaining...)

 

I did notice though that some of them scientists were just dumb... but I guess you have to progress the story somehow... :-p

post #1914 of 21760
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post

If I were to try more of Boredoms, what would you recommend MF?

 

 

I would suggest starting with their later works, as they have more of a universal appeal. Try Vision Creation Newsun and Super Roots 8:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Going even further along, the emphasis on percussion grows even more a la Seadrum / House of the Sun and Super Roots 9:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These two will be most like the clips above. Super Roots 9 is actually a live recording of one of their concerts, one held on New Years Eve with a full vocal choir in addition to the core drum unit. There's also an EP called "Live from Sunflancisco" [sic] which features two short drum workouts, but it's more for collectors IMO.

 

 

 

Then there's the documentary and CD recording of the actual BoaDrum 77 performance, complete with a large booklet featuring color photos of the event. Really a gem, but expensive and something more for collectors again.

 

 

 

 

 

I'd also recommend checking out the Taiga album by their sister band, OOIOO, which is similarly percussion-centric:

 

 

The very latest release from Boredoms, Super Roots 10, kind of takes things in a new direction, featuring a similar drum circle configuration, but with much more emphasis on eYe's DJ work and samples. Sounds like an electronica / dance version of the band:

 

 

 

Turning back the clock, my favorite period of Boredoms personally is their "middle period" or transition period between their earlier punk-noise stuff and their later blissed out cosmic stuff. The album which really defines this period is Super AE, my personal favorite:

 

 

 

There's less of a percussion emphasis and more of Seiichi Yamamoto's amazing guitar work (this was right before he left the band). The songs are repetitive, more Krautrock-esque in their sound. Other works in this style are Super Roots 7, as well as some off-shoots like OOIOO's Gold and Green and Psychobaba's On the Roof of Kedar Lodge. The latter two have more of an Eastern folk vibe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Going back in time further, there's a very brief period of Boredoms circa Super Roots 6 which has them sounding a bit like an otherworldly This Heat. There's an almost minimalist electronica Pole kinda vibe going on there, and I think Super Roots 6 sort of invokes Fennesz's Endless Summer, though I can't really explain why.

 

 

 

The earlier two Super Roots 3 and Super Roots 5 (there is no #4 because eYe didn't want to use that number, which is sort of like the number 13 for the Japanese I suppose?) are unique in the Boredoms catalog as they're both extremely heavy guitar workouts, with #5 being a dronescape of buzz and cymbals and #3 more of a structured Krautrock jam that predicts their later direction in Super Roots 7, Super AE, etc. Only it's more punkish, so it serves as a transition of sorts from their earlier sound.

 

Speaking of which, I'd suggest starting off with Chocolate Synthesizer if you want to explore their earlier noise rock incarnation. This is "weird" Boredoms, what made them notorious in the early 90s. Sonic Youth was a big champion of theirs, so the the high point of their exposure in the West was in this earlier phase. This is pretty much the essence of Japanese "noise rock" of the specific Osaka scene flavor.

 

 

 

I'd also strongly suggest trying Omoide Hatoba if you're fond of this weirder kind of stuff. Seiichi Yamamoto's band essentially takes things in a more Dadaist direction, more of a pop culture mashup of styles, whereas Boredoms sort of creates their own style, albeit one greatly informed by early punk. The Omoide Hatoba album to start with would be Mankato or Kinsei. A slightly more polished rendition of this period would be OOIOO's Feather Float.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earlier still, you're going to be getting into Boredoms' more overtly confrontational punkish stage. They had a hell of a lot of fun during this period, and it comes through on the recordings from that time I think. There's a lot of goofing around and "studio" hijinks. Pop Tatari and the first two Super Roots really capture this exuberance.

 

 

 

When the band speaks about these earlier recordings, they indicate a certain disbelief. It almost seems discontinuous to them. Sort of like someone looking back to wild times in their childhood and thinking "that was really me?"

post #1915 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by gelocks View Post

Well... if you want "science", go to an University, watch a science channel or work R&D somewhere interesting... biggrin.gif

But seriously,  I jut want to be entertained when I watch a movie. I USUALLY never look to see if the science is correct (especially on science fiction... come on... FICTION... name says it all... unless it's like a period drama or something historic, I don't look much into details...) or a machine is working exceeding its capabilities, etc. (for example, when I saw Live Free or Die Hard and saw the F35 - Lightning II performing almost as a helicopter, I almost crapped my pants laughing, knowing WELL that it is not possible BUT I loved that part... it was entertaining...)

I did notice though that some of them scientists were just dumb... but I guess you have to progress the story somehow... :-p
In science fiction movies, anything technical goes, time travel, teleports, anti-gravity, I don't care. It's not the science, it's the protocol. You have people who are supposed to be scientists who are on a planet that no one knows anything about and 1. because the air checks out chemically, they take their frigging helmets off. 2. With a novel specimen of alien life they don't do the entire necropsy under some equivalent of a hood, 3. They "stimulate" the nervous system of this unknown, just cause? And finally the guy sees weird **** in his eyes and just goes about the day? Right. That's when I turned it off.

Fiction is fine, but people need to act in ways consistent with their training/experience.
post #1916 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by gelocks View Post

Well... if you want "science", go to an University, watch a science channel or work R&D somewhere interesting... biggrin.gif

 

But seriously,  I jut want to be entertained when I watch a movie. I USUALLY never look to see if the science is correct (especially on science fiction... come on... FICTION... name says it all... unless it's like a period drama or something historic, I don't look much into details...) or a machine is working exceeding its capabilities, etc. (for example, when I saw Live Free or Die Hard and saw the F35 - Lightning II performing almost as a helicopter, I almost crapped my pants laughing, knowing WELL that it is not possible BUT I loved that part... it was entertaining...)

 

I did notice though that some of them scientists were just dumb... but I guess you have to progress the story somehow... :-p

 

I haven't seen this particular movie but in general I don't mind whatever science or magic they make up as long as it's internally consistent but without a real good explanation people are still people and have to be externally consistent with RL.  They should still act like a normal person, just in a different situation.  Usually, in a good sci-fi story all the sci-fi "stuff" should serve to set the stage for characters to be developed and for themes and messages to be expressed and not the other way around.

 

Also...

 


 

STAX SR-Lambda and SRD-7/SB in the house!

 

I found a reasonable deal and just couldn't help myself...

post #1917 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post


In science fiction movies, anything technical goes, time travel, teleports, anti-gravity, I don't care. It's not the science, it's the protocol. You have people who are supposed to be scientists who are on a planet that no one knows anything about and 1. because the air checks out chemically, they take their frigging helmets off. 2. With a novel specimen of alien life they don't do the entire necropsy under some equivalent of a hood, 3. They "stimulate" the nervous system of this unknown, just cause? And finally the guy sees weird **** in his eyes and just goes about the day? Right. That's when I turned it off.
Fiction is fine, but people need to act in ways consistent with their training/experience.

 

Well:

 

1) It's not the first time this is done in a movie... heck, I even remember that this was done in Mission to Mars...

2) Yeah... that was stupid! LOL BUT I imagine they were just like kids on Christmas, excited just waiting to discover what's below their Christmas tree..

3) Not just cause, curiosity... again, something new...

4) Ignoring physical symptoms is nothing new either, not in movies nor in real life. Heck, how many people have ignore simple headaches and it turns out to be migraines, even tumors, etc...

 

So... I'm not trying to give you reasons for liking or giving the movie a chance, but just saying that if you don't critically watch it, you might just enjoy it. :-p

post #1918 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I would suggest starting with their later works, as they have more of a universal appeal. Try Vision Creation Newsun and Super Roots 8:








Going even further along, the emphasis on percussion grows even more a la Seadrum / House of the Sun and Super Roots 9:









These two will be most like the clips above. Super Roots 9 is actually a live recording of one of their concerts, one held on New Years Eve with a full vocal choir in addition to the core drum unit. There's also an EP called "Live from Sunflancisco" [sic] which features two short drum workouts, but it's more for collectors IMO.




Then there's the documentary and CD recording of the actual BoaDrum 77 performance, complete with a large booklet featuring color photos of the event. Really a gem, but expensive and something more for collectors again.






I'd also recommend checking out the Taiga album by their sister band, OOIOO, which is similarly percussion-centric:



The very latest release from Boredoms, Super Roots 10, kind of takes things in a new direction, featuring a similar drum circle configuration, but with much more emphasis on eYe's DJ work and samples. Sounds like an electronica / dance version of the band:




Turning back the clock, my favorite period of Boredoms personally is their "middle period" or transition period between their earlier punk-noise stuff and their later blissed out cosmic stuff. The album which really defines this period is Super AE, my personal favorite:




There's less of a percussion emphasis and more of Seiichi Yamamoto's amazing guitar work (this was right before he left the band). The songs are repetitive, more Krautrock-esque in their sound. Other works in this style are Super Roots 7, as well as some off-shoots like OOIOO's Gold and Green and Psychobaba's On the Roof of Kedar Lodge. The latter two have more of an Eastern folk vibe.










Going back in time further, there's a very brief period of Boredoms circa Super Roots 6 which has them sounding a bit like an otherworldly This Heat. There's an almost minimalist electronica Pole kinda vibe going on there, and I think Super Roots 6 sort of invokes Fennesz's Endless Summer, though I can't really explain why.




The earlier two Super Roots 3 and Super Roots 5 (there is no #4 because eYe didn't want to use that number, which is sort of like the number 13 for the Japanese I suppose?) are unique in the Boredoms catalog as they're both extremely heavy guitar workouts, with #5 being a dronescape of buzz and cymbals and #3 more of a structured Krautrock jam that predicts their later direction in Super Roots 7, Super AE, etc. Only it's more punkish, so it serves as a transition of sorts from their earlier sound.

Speaking of which, I'd suggest starting off with Chocolate Synthesizer if you want to explore their earlier noise rock incarnation. This is "weird" Boredoms, what made them notorious in the early 90s. Sonic Youth was a big champion of theirs, so the the high point of their exposure in the West was in this earlier phase. This is pretty much the essence of Japanese "noise rock" of the specific Osaka scene flavor.




I'd also strongly suggest trying Omoide Hatoba if you're fond of this weirder kind of stuff. Seiichi Yamamoto's band essentially takes things in a more Dadaist direction, more of a pop culture mashup of styles, whereas Boredoms sort of creates their own style, albeit one greatly informed by early punk. The Omoide Hatoba album to start with would be Mankato or Kinsei. A slightly more polished rendition of this period would be OOIOO's Feather Float.








Earlier still, you're going to be getting into Boredoms' more overtly confrontational punkish stage. They had a hell of a lot of fun during this period, and it comes through on the recordings from that time I think. There's a lot of goofing around and "studio" hijinks. Pop Tatari and the first two Super Roots really capture this exuberance.




When the band speaks about these earlier recordings, they indicate a certain disbelief. It almost seems discontinuous to them. Sort of like someone looking back to wild times in their childhood and thinking "that was really me?"

An Everest of a list to check out, and thank you for that. This should be a fun new musical experience. biggrin.gif
post #1919 of 21760
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post


An Everest of a list to check out, and thank you for that. This should be a fun new musical experience. biggrin.gif

 

I'd try these first:

 

Vision Creation Newsun

Super AE

Chocolate Synthesizer

 

Depending on which you like most, go from there and check out the other works I listed in that respective "period."

post #1920 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

I'd try these first:

Vision Creation Newsun
Super AE
Chocolate Synthesizer

Depending on which you like most, go from there and check out the other works I listed in that respective "period."

Thank you for the suggested, manageable cutdown.
Something that I've been noticing happening to me lately. I'm more willing to spend my money, and almost always instantly and by impulse, on more 'indie' things. For example video games and music. I'm more willing, and faster and having less thinking time, to buy something I've heard on Bandcamp and I love it, then paying some of the more established and accomplished bands, for example Muse's new album. And I probably spent more on indie games than on a AAA game, what with all the constant indie bundles and new indie games coming out, and me buying at launch. I don't know. They would add up more than a single AAA title at launch.

I find it somewhat weird, since I have more spare money then back when I'm in school. It should be as spontaneous as I thought I would act now that I have more money.
Edited by jgray91 - 10/17/12 at 1:35pm
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