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post #18271 of 21443

Currently listening to the Kaede (after having left them alone for a while, none too convinced of the pairing with the AK120) with the 901, and this combo is just lovely. Listening to the 2009 Dark Was the Night charity compilation...I honestly think that 4AD is one of the best labels out there.

 

post #18272 of 21443
Now that the Sony QX100 has been officially revealed, and the API to develop apps for it has been released, here's me dreaming that some Symbian dev develop a Qt app for the QX for me to buy both the camwrtand the app to use with my 808 PureView. Sigh.
post #18273 of 21443
Quote:
Originally Posted by gelocks View Post

Question....
Has anyone here tried the new Bang and Olufsen H6 headphone??? The hotel Inm staying is like a block away from one of their stores and I'm afraid to go in!!! Lol ;-)

 

why? If the salesman act snobby just tell them that you are an audiophile or something and out snob them 

:wink:

post #18274 of 21443
Quote:
Originally Posted by drez View Post
 

 

More than that, what I don't understand is why customers want to reshell their universal IEM's.  Half the time they end up selling them afterwards, possibly because they don't sound so great.  It's not like there is a lack of variety of CIEM's available for any conceivable budget.

 

Funny thing also is most live concert's I've been to the artists use universals.

 

Im reshelling mine simply because I broke mine 

:D

post #18275 of 21443

 

I loved how horrifying that was.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Idsynchrono_24 View Post

Takin virtual moneyshots to the face from a futa? I'll pass lol

 

FUTA PRIDE

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post
 

That's a very interesting point. I honestly think you could apply that to current gen technology too, especially the question of camera in games, cut-scenes vs. "in-game" scripting, etc.

 

I think there's some interesting possibilities in allowing the viewer a chance to "become the director" so to speak.

 

I never feel as though technology is what has limited this kind of emergent gameplay.

 

It's more of a question of how far you can diverge from a linear narrative before the whole thing starts to become a mess. For instance, as much as I like Heavy Rain the branching narrative system in that was both a) misleading and b) horribly flawed. In some ways the technology is an impediment since every single time you introduce new story arcs you have to make new art assets and systems to account for these new outcomes, leading to more points of failure where immersion is broken.

 

The closest thing I have ever experienced as far as users being directors is really just text based roleplay in chatrooms and MUDS. Obviously there is no amazing technology there, just two or more people collaboratively synthesising a narrative.

 

The next closest thing to a Neal Stephenson 'ractor' type scenario is actually Second Life, which has some vibrant roleplaying communities and the benefit of having all art assets generated by users. Unfortunately the quality of the roleplay really suffers when you allow any and all comers to do whatever they like, until it becomes sort of like a children's game where people running around screaming "I SHOT YOU!" "NO YOU DIDN'T YOU MISSED" etc etc. 

 

In the end I suspect, just as with our earlier open world game, players need to have some kind of invisible hand that does guide them through a thoughtful narrative. And if GLADOS proved anything, it's that the invisible hand can actually be very very visible indeed!

 

That or highly simplified and abstracted games I think work well with player freedom. Something like a full VR SpyParty for instance would be astoundingly fun to play I'll bet. I think Neal Stephenson was pretty prescient in making the 'ractor' games in The Diamond Age more or less like self contained parlour games and scenarios.

 

Btw for anyone who hasn't read Neal Stephenson's 'The Diamond Age' and 'Snow Crash' please do. The man more or less coined the phrase 'avatar' as a representational agent in a virtual world. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mimouille View Post
 

Currently listening to the Kaede (after having left them alone for a while, none too convinced of the pairing with the AK120) with the 901, and this combo is just lovely. Listening to the 2009 Dark Was the Night charity compilation...I honestly think that 4AD is one of the best labels out there.

 

 

That is one of my favourite albums :D

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post

Now that the Sony QX100 has been officially revealed, and the API to develop apps for it has been released, here's me dreaming that some Symbian dev develop a Qt app for the QX for me to buy both the camwrtand the app to use with my 808 PureView. Sigh.

 

I can't wait to get the QX100 and start doing Youtube videos with it :3

post #18276 of 21443
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post
 

 

I never feel as though technology is what has limited this kind of emergent gameplay.

 

It's more of a question of how far you can diverge from a linear narrative before the whole thing starts to become a mess. For instance, as much as I like Heavy Rain the branching narrative system in that was both a) misleading and b) horribly flawed. In some ways the technology is an impediment since every single time you introduce new story arcs you have to make new art assets and systems to account for these new outcomes, leading to more points of failure where immersion is broken.

 

The closest thing I have ever experienced as far as users being directors is really just text based roleplay in chatrooms and MUDS. Obviously there is no amazing technology there, just two or more people collaboratively synthesising a narrative.

 

The next closest thing to a Neal Stephenson 'ractor' type scenario is actually Second Life, which has some vibrant roleplaying communities and the benefit of having all art assets generated by users. Unfortunately the quality of the roleplay really suffers when you allow any and all comers to do whatever they like, until it becomes sort of like a children's game where people running around screaming "I SHOT YOU!" "NO YOU DIDN'T YOU MISSED" etc etc. 

 

In the end I suspect, just as with our earlier open world game, players need to have some kind of invisible hand that does guide them through a thoughtful narrative. And if GLADOS proved anything, it's that the invisible hand can actually be very very visible indeed!

 

That or highly simplified and abstracted games I think work well with player freedom. Something like a full VR SpyParty for instance would be astoundingly fun to play I'll bet. I think Neal Stephenson was pretty prescient in making the 'ractor' games in The Diamond Age more or less like self contained parlour games and scenarios.

 

 

 

All good points, but I'm not even talking about narrative structure so much as how the narrative is presented on the most fundamental level. In other words: camera movement, lighting, angles, timing, sequencing, etc. These are all qualities that one can use to differentiate one director from another when it comes to filmmaking. I'm talking about stuff like what one chooses to show on or off camera at a given time (like Sontag's assertion that photographic art is fundamentally what one doesn't depict or excludes from the frame) and how the boundaries of a particular canvas are set. Invariably, the more control you surrender to the player, the further gaming diverges from filmmaking for instance.

 

Take 3D gaming for example. The issue of camera became extremely pressing early on in 3D gaming and questions arose like how much control should be given to the player, and some game designers actually hated the idea of not being able to frame sequences a particular way. Cut-scenes are thus employed to restore some of that narrative control, allowing for dramatic camera work and a more "cinematic" type of experience. Not just the camera, but the character or other subjects as well. That's always been an interesting point for me, because I'm a very kinetic-visual person and on screen movement is something I always pay a lot of attention to in directing, whether it's the camera or the subjects. Sometimes in games where the scripting and direction is mostly done in-game, it can be rather difficult to achieve a similar effect, and even games like BioShock Infinite will wrestle control away from the player from time to time to have Booker do something on cue or in a particularly stylized way. It's always a little tragic to have full control during one of these dramatic scenes and see a player basically hopping around like a lunatic, wasting ammo while NPCs try to talk, or even missing entire events because s/he's off staring at a reflective surface somewhere.

post #18277 of 21443

I remember being surprised when I played System Shock for the first time, and found that it had options for using a VR headset, waaay back in '95. Mech games and flight sims would definitely benefit from VR.

post #18278 of 21443
Am I the only one who had to Google what Futa was?
post #18279 of 21443
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by veyrongatti View Post
 

Electric Boogaloo is so last year :tongue:

 

 

I think those are bots that are picking random phrases out of the thread and reposting them. The broken image at the end is probably a spam attempt to go along with it. Saw a few of those types of posts (seemingly random strings from members who just signed up and broken images at the end) earlier a few pages back. Just don't reply to 'em and report 'em.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by blueangel2323 View Post

Am I the only one who had to Google what Futa was?

 

 

You're a better person now than you were before.

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by MuppetFace - 9/10/13 at 7:29am
post #18280 of 21443
I had to google Futa too...have not watched or taken interest in Hen Tie since Urotsukidoji so I need to brush up my vocabulary apparently.
post #18281 of 21443
post #18282 of 21443
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueangel2323 View Post  Am I the only one who had to Google what Futa was?

 

I still don't know what Futa is... :confused_face_2:

 

(Unrelated: Nina is looking very cute there)

 


 

Finally heard the HE-500 today... only for a short period of time, and through an RSA Raptor, source was an HM-901. Comparing it against the HD800, I think I prefer the HD800, at least with this setup. Then again, it was only for a few minutes. I like the HE-500, though, and actually prefer the way it fits snugly to the cavernous feeling of the HD800...

 

Also, heard the RE600 today --- I like it. What's the fuss again? Okay, maybe we shouldn't get into that little row here...

 

Also, heard the Cardas EM today --- didn't hate it like I thought I would. It makes for a good home, desktop in-ear. Definitely not for outdoor use, though.

post #18283 of 21443
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomscy2000 View Post


Also, heard the RE600 today --- I like it. What's the fuss again? Okay, maybe we shouldn't get into that little row here...
Quote:

Thoughts versus the re262?

Maybe some day someone will create a single dynamic with the bass of the EX1000 and the highs of the RE0.

Edited by shotgunshane - 9/10/13 at 9:51am
post #18284 of 21443
That edit didn't go so well on my iPhone.
post #18285 of 21443
Quote:
Originally Posted by shotgunshane View Post  That edit didn't go so well on my iPhone.

 

I didn't do a direct comparison, just a brief listen of my music through the Concero HP. Very, very clean, completely distortion free type of sound. Easy to like. Slightly laid back highs, different from the highs of the RE400, which seem thinner and peakier, versus a very smooth articulation in the 600. From memory, the 600 sounds more akin to the mid-centric but still open nature of the RE262, whereas the RE400 feels like a much improved RE0. I haven't heard the 272 so I can't comment. One thing is that the 600 isn't going to bombard you with details. It's more about the experience than linearity and absolute transparency. IIRC you didn't like the RE-400 because it lacked character. I think the 600 definitely has more. If you're willing to overlook the price tag and just give Fang an 'A' for effort, then the 600 is great. If not, then the big value debate lives on.

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