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The diary entries of a little girl in her 30s! ~ Part 2 - Page 1213

post #18181 of 21392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achmedisdead View Post  I hope they issue radiation suits to everyone.

 

Eh, it's fine --- mutants in Tokyo --- just like the Wolverine movie!


Edited by tomscy2000 - 9/7/13 at 6:41pm
post #18182 of 21392

Since the conversation was briefly about orthos. A video with detailed final impressions will be uploaded next weekend.

 

 

Romy, I really love this headphone. It may not rank a 10 in all categories but it comes so freaking close in sounding like what I want it's scary. Add a better sound stage and it would be perfect for me. Thanks for making me aware of it a year ago. I owe you one.

:gs1000smile:


Edited by DigitalFreak - 9/7/13 at 8:44pm
post #18183 of 21392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post

I screened Stoker last night. First off the cinematography is just brilliant, I have not seen something shot that well for a long time. The basement of that house reminds me of a place I lived in as a kid, scared the poo out of me to go down there.

Goode just defines the whole Mr Creepy genre there. Mia capturing the whole spirit of the role. The final scene I thought was a little less thought out than the rest of the film.

All in all totally watchable.

Wonder what it would have been like with a Korean cast?

and Boy is Kidman showing the ill effects of Botox these days. Damn shame that.

Oh yea anybody else catch the EW9's lying on the couch?
Agree on all counts but did not spot the EW9. I like the fact that he used "caucasian" actors, worked pretry well.
post #18184 of 21392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post
 

Oh yea anybody else catch the EW9's lying on the couch?

 

Yes! You reminded me!

 

Glad you liked it.

post #18185 of 21392
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post
 

Romy, I really love this headphone. It may not rank a 10 in all categories but it comes so freaking close in sounding like what I want it's scary. Add a better sound stage and it would be perfect for me. Thanks for making me aware of it a year ago. I owe you one.

:gs1000smile:

 

No problemo.

 

I really like it too. Pretty hard to beat in the sub-$1k crowd, at least for me. Kinda fell the same way about the Koss ESP/950, though for slightly different reasons.

 

The Abyss is rather similar to the Paradox in many ways to me, kind of a "super-powered" take on that type of signature, which is why I'd rather listen to it than most anything else out there in the land of full-sized summit-fi headphones right now save for an Orpheus or modded HeAudio Jade. I still really like other stuff like the new Floats, SR-007, SR-Omega, Sony R10 ...  but they have issues that put them slightly behind based on my personal priorities.

 


 

Speaking of, I took a listen to another L3000 yesterday. I've had such a love / hate relationship with this thing over the years (it was my first 'summit-fi' headphone). Since two years ago or so it's been mostly hate LOL. Seriously I want to love this thing. Aesthetically, it's one of my favorites of all time with its dapper leather-clad earcups and goofy wing system. I want to just admire it like an enthralled lover. Even the name "L3000" is appealing. It stands off to the side among its brethren, aloof and mysterious, that other flagship that only makes a few lists. A rarity. Elusive. Less obvious.

 

Only it sounds worse than most of the woodies AT sold for a fraction of the cost. It sounds metallic, utterly artificial, and grating but without the usual clarity that AT's harsher models tend to impart. It sounds murky, confused, and congested. I also never understood this thing's supposed "speaker-like bass." To me the bass is far from that and lacks any sort of chutzpah. Seriously... I used to like the way these sounded? What was I thinking? Having heard six units over the years (including this one), it's not a consistency thing either. This is just the way the L3000 was voiced for some reason.

 

And I keep going back, keep listening in the hopes that something will redeem it. Keep trying different amps. Because, again, it's just so wonderful as an object. Not so much as a headphone sadly.

post #18186 of 21392
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post
 

 

 

Yeah, I hear you on the backlog of games. This year, because of my schedule, I've had to be especially selective as to what I devote my time to playing. First there was Dead Space 3 followed by BioShock Infinite, both of which ended up being somewhat disappointing to me. Fortunately Blood Dragon came along and filled the FPS void left in my cyborg heart. Things only got better from there thanks to The Last of Us and Saints Row IV. In between those last two I also replayed the Uncharted series because I was on a Naughty Dog binge; in fact I almost ordered the Jak & Daxter collection too, but I came to my senses and realized I had enough on my plate as is

 

I'll be giving GTA V a chance when it comes out this month. I've actually never played GTA IV, but hearing about the sim-like aspects of it make it seem kinda tedious. Stuff like having to spend a few minutes trying to find a taxi cab in order to go to the other side of town and taking forever just to drive anywhere. By comparison I can literally run faster than a sports car and leap over buildings in Saints Row IV. Really, it's so much fun jumping off the roof of a skyscraper and gliding over an entire city with your arms and legs stretched out like a human plane. Cars and other vehicles like UFOs exist not as necessities, but rather optional things for having fun and causing mayhem. Obviously it's a different sort of game despite having similar mechanics and drawing from the same wellspring, and superpowers would be out of place in the more 'realistic' world of GTA, but I mention this because of what it really represents at its core. Nothing in Saints Row IV feels tedious. There are challenges, sure, but it doesn't feel like the game is making you do chores. That's one thing I really hated about No More Heroes despite liking the game overall: they included these really mundane and repetitive tasks as a commentary on game design, but at the end of the day I still had to do them. I just hope that GTA V doesn't feel too much like grind work. When looking at pictures of the game, I was impressed with the scope and variety of the environments. For instance large rolling countryside and scenic vistas with ground freshly tilled by day laborers. I'm a sucker for detailed game worlds in which I can be immersed.

 

By the same token, I understand what you mean about getting sidetracked all the time. With vastly open world games (Elder Scrolls for instance) I experience something akin to overstimulation, a sort of panic that sets in due to all the freedom. It's almost like an existential dread where I'm paddling out in the middle of the ocean and can't get to shore. I lack direction. I end up wandering around aimlessly for hours staring at foliage. Which is actually pretty damn cool, and if I didn't have a life outside of gaming I could probably enter some kind of zen state doing it. Ultimately though I find there's something appealing about balance. Ideally I want a strong, compelling story at the core of the game while it maintains a few open side quests and room for exploration to an extent most of the time. That's why BioWare is one was one of my favorite developers. Deux Ex always did this well too. As for Saints Row IV, I'm finding its main storyline is a lot more captivating than I was expecting. It's just so much fun, the characters are so likable, and the scenarios are so diverse. The writing is quite good---dare I say witty---and it does a good job of lampooning other games. I actually find I have to limit the time I spend on the main story, as I want to savor it, so I "force" myself to do some free roaming now and then. The real stroke of genius though in my humble opinion comes from the way the game treats your stirring up trouble and going on destructive rampages. Here it's actually an integral part of the main story line, not just a sideline indulgence. The goal is to cause mayhem and run amok in the world, essentially trying to break it. Thus you're never in a position to say "forget the story, I just want to do whatever" since doing whatever is part of the story. There are a number of entertaining side challenges too, and I'm actually inspired to earn gold rankings in them because they reward you with crazy items or abilities.

 

Speaking of sandbox type games, the next release that'll probably eat up all my time for such things is Arkham Origins. I really enjoyed Arkham Asylum. It still wows me with its production values and level of polish. I find the series manages to regulate pace rather effectively for its respective genre due to the Metroid-like elements where you can only advance to certain points in a given area with your current gear which in turn gets updated as you play the main story. As with Saints Row, the story is compelling and leaves you eager to find out what happens next, the characters (ie. rogues gallery) are compelling, and the roaming is handled effortlessly. The overall mood of these games is what stands out the most to me; it feels authentic to its source material, and you actually feel like a superhero when you play. Aside from that, I'm looking forward to Beyond: Two Souls, AquaPazza, Disgaea D2, Guided Fate Paradox, the Kingdom Hearts remix, Zelda Link Between Worlds, Ys: Memories of Celceta, Watchdogs, Black Flag, Dead Rising 3, and Second Son. Whew.

 

There are quite a few games I regret not having enough time to get into this year: Shin Megami Tensei IV, Wrath of the White Witch, Far Cry 3 (which is kinda funny since I've played the add-on Blood Dragon but not the main game), Remember Me, Dead or Alive 5Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance, Killer Is Dead, Metro Last Light, the new X-Com games, the Painkiller remake, and the reboots for Devil May Cry and Tomb Raider. I may go back and revisit some of these at some point, but for now it seems unlikely with what lurks on the horizon. It'll be especially hard for me to work up the motivation once the next generation of consoles launches.

 

I don't know why I never liked the Bioshock games. With the first one, I found it being rather good but there were elements about it that really didn't hit me, and those things were what ultimately lead me to sell it. What I didn't like about it was the whole "magic thing", so to say. Now, I don't dislike magic in games, I was a huge Final Fantasy fantast over the years, so it's not that, but the mix of magic/spells/mana (or whatevs) into FPS games where you have guns and are supposed to shoot your way through - be it run'n'gun or strategically. I don't know why I have a hard time with the games where they mix these things, I just do. I think it's the whole realistic vs supernatural for me - it doesn't always blend well. Sometimes it does though: Prototype, one of the most ridiculed games (imo) turned out to be one of my favorite games. S.T.A.L.K.E.R. Shadow of Chernobyl, on paper I shouldn't like it (they mix "realistic" RPG and FPS with supernatural monsters..) is on my All-time Top 3. I think my point is that I like surreal, or supernatural, when it's supposed to be that, and realistic when it's supposed to be realistic. The Bioshock games never got the mix right for me. Having that said, I still haven't played Bioshock Infinite and I still have my hopes for it being one of those games where I ultimately can accept the supernatural magic part and overlook it being an FPS game.

 

As fgor the open world, yeah I can somewhat relate to that, even though I rarely have problems with the worlds being too big for me. Far Cry 3 is supposed to have this huge open world, which it does, but I don't have a problem with it being big. It's not so much about getting there, but how you got there. Knowing that I have a mission waiting for me on the other side of this open world, I totally immerse myself into the game and see the getting to the mission as an adventure in itself, a quest to getting to where I need to go to get to the next step. That's a part of the adventure. As for what you describe as that zen state wandering around aimlessly for hours, is what I experience with STALKER. I mean, I've had the game for years, and I've put in too many hours on the game, but I've only finished it once. The game invites you for exploring, and is beautifully made and if you let yourself go, the main purpose is exploring and wandering for hours and the main quest is merely a side quest. That game is the definition of It's not so much about getting there, but how you got there

 

After playing the Arkham City I bought Arkham Asylum. I still haven't finished Arkham City, but I figure I have to finish those two before going with Arkham Origins. Arkham City is also one of my alltime favorites. I look forward to Watchdogs (I associate the name to Sleeping Dogs, another one of the games I haven't finished) because it somehow invites me to mess around with people with various hacking methods. I guess I like games that gives me the freedom to mess around like that. That's why I am fan of huge open world sandbox games.

 

I was supposed to start playing Saints Row yesterday night, but I somehow ended on the couch with the iPad instead. I need to do another attempt tonight.

post #18187 of 21392

Ok, the question from me is how?

 

post #18188 of 21392

Fake lol.

post #18189 of 21392

If its fake it sure is a well done fake.

post #18190 of 21392
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post
 

 

I don't know why I never liked the Bioshock games. With the first one, I found it being rather good but there were elements about it that really didn't hit me, and those things were what ultimately lead me to sell it. What I didn't like about it was the whole "magic thing", so to say. Now, I don't dislike magic in games, I was a huge Final Fantasy fantast over the years, so it's not that, but the mix of magic/spells/mana (or whatevs) into FPS games where you have guns and are supposed to shoot your way through - be it run'n'gun or strategically. I don't know why I have a hard time with the games where they mix these things, I just do. I think it's the whole realistic vs supernatural for me - it doesn't always blend well. Sometimes it does though: Prototype, one of the most ridiculed games (imo) turned out to be one of my favorite games. S.T.A.L.K.E.R. Shadow of Chernobyl, on paper I shouldn't like it (they mix "realistic" RPG and FPS with supernatural monsters..) is on my All-time Top 3. I think my point is that I like surreal, or supernatural, when it's supposed to be that, and realistic when it's supposed to be realistic. The Bioshock games never got the mix right for me. Having that said, I still haven't played Bioshock Infinite and I still have my hopes for it being one of those games where I ultimately can accept the supernatural magic part and overlook it being an FPS game.

 

 

 

Personally I *love* it when magic gets mixed with technology. Perhaps it stems from my being a child of the 80s at heart, but there's something inherently satisfying to me about attacking robots with spells or shooting wizards with guns. I see it as part of an "old versus new" paradigm where the dusty and archaic butts up against the sparkly and new.

 

The thing is, delineating terms such as "magic" and "supernatural" in a medium like videogames can be tricky. Often times things that seem magical in one context could be given a science fiction explanation in another. I'd say it really depends to a large extent on the gameworld in question and how the laws of that universe are written (whether it makes sense or not). In BioShock for instance, shooting bugs and thunderbolts out of your sweaty palms is actually not supernatural. They attribute these things to the chemical properties of some sea slug. The ghosts you see are also effects of the ADAM or something; apparently it stores memories on a molecular level. Obviously if we use the standards of our own universe to judge these things they're supernatural, but if we did that then ALL videogames would have supernatural elements due to characters regaining health from eating candy or surviving multiple gunshots to the head. So yeah, in the context of the BioShock universe, I'd say there isn't much "magic." It's written into the game as crazy-ass science.

 

What appeals to me so much about the first BioShock is the direction. On the one hand, there's the art direction which gives me this amazing underwater city to explore with its speakeasy vibe (an aesthetic that really appeals to me personally). It's like this big film noir haunted house. The mood, the lighting, the color pallet... it all just strikes a chord with me. There's a delightful absurdity in looking out the window and seeing the murky ocean depths, this sense of arrogance about the whole structure told in its very existence and the water ready to breach the glass and swallow up humanity's crumbling hubris. For me Rapture is somehow confining and claustrophobic yet at the same time sprawling and intimidating. I wanted to know more about it, about its history and the people who used to occupy it (and still do), about how things where before it all went to hell and why it went there. The game nourished that sentiment in me by providing exposition in artifacts and moments of varying subtlety: the "found sound" audio clips, the lingering spectral traces, the ruins of leisure. Most of all though the broken and scarred remnants of its tenants, wandering the halls half-barefoot while gibbering to themselves about former obligations and current lamentations.

 

Which brings me to the in-game direction. Using light and shadow and sound it created some of this past generation's most memorable set pieces to my mind. Clever little tricks like turning out the lights and playing a noise, then turning them back on to reveal an object in the room has suddenly gone missing. Or disguising enemies as inanimate objects. Or projecting shadows in a way that fools you into thinking it's something else. Personally I adore that kinda schiit. It's approaching game direction in a way analogous to film direction where these types of variables are always a consideration. In terms of gameplay things were simple enough (even downright primitive in some respects like no simultaneous dual wielding of plasmids and guns), but the game always maintained a masterful command of pace, both in what was going on onscreen and also with the player's perception. Events unfolded in a way that seemed really engaging.

 

I was ultimately disappointed with BioShock Infinite by comparison. It seemed to me as though there was so much pressure to top the last game, the direction ultimately lacked focus. I got the sense that there were many, many different versions of the game during the development period---something that becomes apparent when you see how different some aspects were in previews and read interviews during this process---almost as if they couldn't decide what they wanted and kept trying something new. While this is kind of poetically in keeping with the overall theme, the end result feels like a bit of a rushed patchwork with underdeveloped characters, locations, and plot points that ultimately go nowhere. Some elements feel like leftovers from previous builds where the game was perhaps more strategy oriented or involved stealth or exploration more. Elizabeth telling you to play it cool in town for instance is ultimately inconsequential, and it basically boils down to "don't pilfer anything or the guards will attack" maybe twice during the game.

 

Also early on Elizabeth is much more interactive in some places, basically acting like the developers made her out to be in early clips, only to be dumbed down considerably as your companion NPC for the rest of it. There are elements that seem to encourage exploration and side tracking---lockpicks, code books---but they're mostly afterthoughts and appear disproportionately early on as well (when you've amassed a ton of lockpicks by the end of the game, there's nothing to do with them!). There is no morality system in place despite the game presenting you with several choices that seem to suggest there was one at some point. Plot points and characters are left awkwardly hanging in thin air or brought to swift and highly unsatisfying conclusions. You can only carry two guns at a given time, but somehow you can carry fifty pairs of clothes to change into at a given notice to give you different enhancements. Unlike the first game most of these enhancements seem useless too, mostly due to their being so oddly specific (ex. "25% increase in strength when jumping from a rail onto a platform" or something). 

 

Really though, the biggest disappointment for me was the lack of dynamism in the game. I just couldn't dig my heels into it like I wanted. There's very little exploration for instance, and the rail system (which is billed as being a means of transporting people around Columbia) is instead a series of closed circuits surrounding glorified battle arenas. Your abilities in the first game were also used as a way of connecting with the gameworld too, allowing you to access new areas. Here plasmids vigors are only once used in an environmental checkpoint, and the rest of the time they're just interchangeable combat options. Elizabeth's powers are, disappointingly, much the same way. It would have been cool to use them in a context specific way more, such as in solving puzzles or in choosing environmental-based solutions to handling enemies (as in one of the previews), but instead we get a handful of generic options we can turn on or off. My favorite moments by far were the tidbits that deepened my understanding of the game's world, like the quick little scenes of interaction between characters while waiting for the next area. Also I loved the penny arcade machines and portable record players ('voxophones') that gave exposition much like the tape recorders in the first game. I just wish the game went a little further in detailing some things.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post
 

As fgor the open world, yeah I can somewhat relate to that, even though I rarely have problems with the worlds being too big for me. Far Cry 3 is supposed to have this huge open world, which it does, but I don't have a problem with it being big. It's not so much about getting there, but how you got there. Knowing that I have a mission waiting for me on the other side of this open world, I totally immerse myself into the game and see the getting to the mission as an adventure in itself, a quest to getting to where I need to go to get to the next step. That's a part of the adventure. As for what you describe as that zen state wandering around aimlessly for hours, is what I experience with STALKER. I mean, I've had the game for years, and I've put in too many hours on the game, but I've only finished it once. The game invites you for exploring, and is beautifully made and if you let yourself go, the main purpose is exploring and wandering for hours and the main quest is merely a side quest. That game is the definition of It's not so much about getting there, but how you got there

 

Yeah, I definitely understand the appeal. It's just for someone who is incredibly indecisive and OCD there's a lot of anxiety present in deciding the 'how' part of how to get there. Do I do this, or do I do that? Will I even be able to do the other later if I choose this one? Also what sort of character should I play? I don't want to invest tons of time into building a character only to end up not liking said character, so I better be careful early on in planning this development.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post
 

After playing the Arkham City I bought Arkham Asylum. I still haven't finished Arkham City, but I figure I have to finish those two before going with Arkham Origins. Arkham City is also one of my alltime favorites. I look forward to Watchdogs (I associate the name to Sleeping Dogs, another one of the games I haven't finished) because it somehow invites me to mess around with people with various hacking methods. I guess I like games that gives me the freedom to mess around like that. That's why I am fan of huge open world sandbox games.

 

I was supposed to start playing Saints Row yesterday night, but I somehow ended on the couch with the iPad instead. I need to do another attempt tonight.

 

 

I love Arkham City too. Asylum isn't quite so 'open world' and is more focused, but I still enjoyed it as well. Earlier someone made a very good point about open worlds feeling dead. I think this is an apt descriptor of the first Infamous game. The NPCs all stand around and do nothing but convulse or act stupid for some reason. Kind of the same way in Saints Row, but the silly nature of the game adds vibrancy back into the world, and in the 4th game the NPC behavior is kinda explained in the story (again part of that 'stroke of genius' IMHO). In Arkham City I felt the NPCs were really well done, basically pockets of thugs up to no good. Their dialog was actually fun to listen to, they taunted you. I guess the 'citizens' also being the enemies skirted around the usual issue of having to populate the world with aimless spazzes perpetually in transit.


Edited by MuppetFace - 9/8/13 at 3:33am
post #18191 of 21392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post
 

 

 

As fgor the open world, yeah I can somewhat relate to that, even though I rarely have problems with the worlds being too big for me. Far Cry 3 is supposed to have this huge open world, which it does, but I don't have a problem with it being big. It's not so much about getting there, but how you got there. Knowing that I have a mission waiting for me on the other side of this open world, I totally immerse myself into the game and see the getting to the mission as an adventure in itself, a quest to getting to where I need to go to get to the next step. That's a part of the adventure. As for what you describe as that zen state wandering around aimlessly for hours, is what I experience with STALKER. I mean, I've had the game for years, and I've put in too many hours on the game, but I've only finished it once. The game invites you for exploring, and is beautifully made and if you let yourself go, the main purpose is exploring and wandering for hours and the main quest is merely a side quest. That game is the definition of It's not so much about getting there, but how you got there

 

 

Then you need Far Cry 2 in your life. My roommate and I fought over who got to use his computer to play it at the time. "Exploring" the African wilderness, and fighting malaria was plenty of fun. I also loved the fire simulations. We'd set fires in dry bushes and run away giggling like little girls. Of course, if the wind was blowing in our direction panic would ensue.

post #18192 of 21392
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

Fake lol.

The magic of computer software... wink.gif
post #18193 of 21392

I shudder for the next generation of online gamers considering the Ozzies are training their kids young for future virtual combat.

 

post #18194 of 21392
Quote:

Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

 

The SR-007 driven by the LL2 is ultimately more transparent for me personally because I can forget about it and connect more to the music.

 

Curses, I don't think the LL2 is what I heard the SR-007Mk1 with... now I have some major curiosity to satisfy.  :(

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by warrenpchi View Post

BTW, have you ever heard an SR-007Mk1?  It seems to me that people who prefer the SR-007Mk1 over the SR-009 are few and far between.  Other than Romy and I, I only know of a handful of others that share the same preference.

Now that I have a BHSE, I think a case can be made that the SR-007Mk1 is as good as the SR-009, not as detailed but slightly more balanced and a little more refined (silky smooth treble).

 

Dang nabbit, I'm pretty sure I didn't hear the SR-007Mk1 with the BHSE either!  :(  I dunno if I'd call it less detailed, just more even keeled.  I consider the SR-009 and the Abyss to be somewhat hyper-detailed.  For me, they're like that annoying audiophile that keeps wanting to point out parts of the music as I'm listening.  It gets fatiguing (or at least annoying) after a while.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by warrenpchi View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post

Man, the aftermeet chat is as much fun as the meet itself. I think I'm into headphones again. Finally tried the HD800 and... the SR-009 on the Aristaeus. Suffice it to say, the STAX is god's god tier.

BTW, have you ever heard an SR-007Mk1?  It seems to me that people who prefer the SR-007Mk1 over the SR-009 are few and far between.  Other than Romy and I, I only know of a handful of others that share the same preference.

No one brought over a SR-007mk1,but the guy that brought over the 009 and Aristaeus, smeckles, brought a trolley full of high end gear including snakes, a Cavalli tube amp, a Phonitor, DACX2 (from which I think that's its name, since Otried to install its proprietary driver) and the HE-500,which I kind of like too.
There are actually people that like the 007mk2 ore than the 009 present there.

 

Snakes?  Ooh, I have yet to hear a Phonitor!  That was once on my to-get list so I'm still curious about that one.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post
 

Since the conversation was briefly about orthos. A video with detailed final impressions will be uploaded next weekend.

 

 

Romy, I really love this headphone. It may not rank a 10 in all categories but it comes so freaking close in sounding like what I want it's scary. Add a better sound stage and it would be perfect for me. Thanks for making me aware of it a year ago. I owe you one.

:gs1000smile:

 

Now I'm super curious as to what you think of the Alpha Dog, which is also highly-regarded for its staging BTW.  :smile:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post
 

Speaking of, I took a listen to another L3000 yesterday. I've had such a love / hate relationship with this thing over the years (it was my first 'summit-fi' headphone). Since two years ago or so it's been mostly hate LOL. Seriously I want to love this thing. Aesthetically, it's one of my favorites of all time with its dapper leather-clad earcups and goofy wing system. I want to just admire it like an enthralled lover. Even the name "L3000" is appealing. It stands off to the side among its brethren, aloof and mysterious, that other flagship that only makes a few lists. A rarity. Elusive. Less obvious.

 

I can totally relate in terms of its looks.  I mean, seriously guys, look at this thing!

 

 

 

 

Romy, have you ever heard it with that A-T amp?  With that pairing, I enjoyed - if not appreciated - its presentation.

post #18195 of 21392
Power cables = snakes.
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