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The diary entries of a little girl in her 30s! ~ Part 2 - Page 1043

post #15631 of 21416
Quote:
Originally Posted by mosshorn View Post

So I gotta ask, does it feel as satisfying as regular cigs? They seem like a nice alternative for me, since I'm a very big stress smoker (when it comes to cigs, cigars don't apply).

I've only been vaping for a day but so far so good so we'll see. Like I said the juice I'm using has 0 nicotine and thus far it's cut my smoking in half. Once I get some juice with a mild nicotine dosage I'll be completely chucking the cigarettes. So far it's actually a good tasting smoke. The only niggle thus far, I wish my unit gave me a slightly warmer vape

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mimouille View Post

I do no understand how an anal thermometer will help you to quit smoking ? confused_face(1).gif

I can fill it with juice and I can pick the nicotine dosages and slowly cut the dosage until it's zero. Also, an e cigarette doesn't contain a quarter of the carcinogens and other chemical crap a cigarette does. Usually a lot of people will smoke the e cigarette and wean down to 0 nicotine or a very mild 0.3 nicotine dosage an then either stop altogether or just continue vaping off and on at the 0.3 or 0 nicotine dosage level.

post #15632 of 21416
Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post

I've only been vaping for a day but so far so good so we'll see. Like I said the juice I'm using has 0 nicotine and thus far it's cut my smoking in half. Once I get some juice with a mild nicotine dosage I'll be completely chucking the cigarettes. So far it's actually a good tasting smoke. The only niggle thus far, I wish my unit gave me a slightly warmer vape

I can fill it with juice and I can pick the nicotine dosages and slowly cut the dosage until it's zero. Also, an e cigarette doesn't contain a quarter of the carcinogens and other chemical crap a cigarette does. Usually a lot of people will smoke the e cigarette and wean down to 0 nicotine or a very mild 0.3 nicotine dosage an then either stop altogether or just continue vaping off and on at the 0.3 or 0 nicotine dosage level.

 

I think there are slightly higher voltage units you can switch in that would give you a warmer vapor.  You could check madvapes.com as they've got an enormous host of options.

post #15633 of 21416

Is there a standard kind of ritual for July 4 celebrations? I understand there is fireworks and a BBQ. It sounds a bit like Australia day.

post #15634 of 21416
Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post

Hey MuppetFace, right now I'm giving the CD Disconnect From Desire by School Of Seven Bells a listen and I like this CD every bit as much as Ghoststory. Thank you very much for mentioning this band on the thread. They're quickly becoming one of my more favorite artists in my collection.


+1 on that.

 

Giving Alpinisms a go round now. Actually a new listen that has me reaching for the "better equipment" shelf.

post #15635 of 21416
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

Is there a standard kind of ritual for July 4 celebrations? I understand there is fireworks and a BBQ. It sounds a bit like Australia day.

 

Well generally yes. But it's not like it use to be. Not by a long shot. Before there was so much fireworks. It was so quiet yesterday. Only heard 3 bombs ;).

post #15636 of 21416
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

 

Well generally yes. But it's not like it use to be. Not by a long shot. Before there was so much fireworks. It was so quiet yesterday. Only heard 3 bombs ;).


I think it's safe to say both Canada Day and the USA's 4th of July has become more of an excuse for family and friends to get together an eat and drink their faces off.

 

@ a_recording

 

When exactly is Australia day anyways? I've run across enough Ozzies on the net but few, if any, ever seem to mention much about it.

post #15637 of 21416
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

Is there a standard kind of ritual for July 4 celebrations? I understand there is fireworks and a BBQ. It sounds a bit like Australia day.

That's pretty much the core of the 4th of July celebration: BBQ & Fireworks. At the BBQ there's lots of traditional summer time foods including hot dogs, hamburgers, corn on the cob, watermelon, etc. I suspect just as many people have been injured from fireworks as from macaroni salad being left out in the sun so that the mayo becomes a teaming mass of microorganisms. Some cities have parades and/or street fairs. Lots of American flags and red, white & blue decorations - and, of course, lots of marketing & advertising of big sales of anything from cars, clothes, sporting goods, electronics, furniture, etc, etc.

Where I live, there is an annual 4th of July "Push Me, Pull You" parade, which is a parade down Main St that anyone can join, as long as there are no motorized vehicles - you can walk, pull a wagon, ride bikes, scooters, skates or whatever. It is really fun, you can pile the little kids into a wagon or strollers covered in American flags & red, white & blue streamers, and older kids ride bikes, skate boards & scooters. At the end of the parade, there is a street fair and a concert of local bands.
Edited by billybob_jcv - 7/5/13 at 9:01pm
post #15638 of 21416
We did the family bbq, and for my area a rarity occurred - there was cRazY fireworks around my house. We all had a great time,...and I even had a few drinks. Great day!!!
Edited by tds101 - 7/5/13 at 9:01pm
post #15639 of 21416
Yep, BBQ, fireworks (though much less than when I was younger) and sales to get people away from their BBQs.
post #15640 of 21416
Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post

 

 

@ a_recording

 

When exactly is Australia day anyways? I've run across enough Ozzies on the net but few, if any, ever seem to mention much about it.

I think its Jan 26th

post #15641 of 21416
Can't sleep last night. Read some post on how someone was disappointed with his brother and lost respect to him. That hurt me more than I thought possible. Must be that's what my deepest fear as the eldest off 5 siblings, away for a long time from home.

I can see it in myself too. Out of uni, continuing with higher education. Didn't finish it. Looking for a job for two years later, dodging any questions remotely inquiring about that problem. Seemingly doesn't take it seriously. That's what the poster said he is disappointed in his brother. I can posit with 97% certainty it is mostly to keep up a strong facade, since that's what I am doing and what I thought it would look like. But it seems that this could happen...

I think it's easy for a younger sibling to say that they're disappointed with their elder, because they don'f have the extra baggage of being an older sibling. You're not the brightest beacon of hope of your parents. You're not the shining potential hero in the eyes of your siblings. You won't be the head of the family should the inevitable ccomes sooner.

You don't have to think things out a lot and have the liberty to care less.
post #15642 of 21416
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post

Can't sleep last night. Read some post on how someone was disappointed with his brother and lost respect to him. That hurt me more than I thought possible. Must be that's what my deepest fear as the eldest off 5 siblings, away for a long time from home.

I can see it in myself too. Out of uni, continuing with higher education. Didn't finish it. Looking for a job for two years later, dodging any questions remotely inquiring about that problem. Seemingly doesn't take it seriously. That's what the poster said he is disappointed in his brother. I can posit with 97% certainty it is mostly to keep up a strong facade, since that's what I am doing and what I thought it would look like. But it seems that this could happen...

I think it's easy for a younger sibling to say that they're disappointed with their elder, because they don'f have the extra baggage of being an older sibling. You're not the brightest beacon of hope of your parents. You're not the shining potential hero in the eyes of your siblings. You won't be the head of the family should the inevitable ccomes sooner.

You don't have to think things out a lot and have the liberty to care less.

It's hard for me to imagine what kind of pressure being the eldest sibling creates. Being the youngest in my family I guess I do sort of get babied so to speak, and my family are patient with my "immaturity" (a term I use out of convenience as I don't consider it to be all that important) perhaps I should say relative lack of self discipline in certain respects this hobby being an obvious example. Not being faced with these expectations may be a double edged sword as sometimes I feel that crisis or discomfort are powerful motivating forces, albeit not the ideal ones.

Late last year I found myself out of my first job and have not been able to find a job in my field since, and perhaps it is this lack of discomfort that is hindering my progress, or maybe things really are that tough and I am simply not competitive in the jobs I am applying for.

It could also be a matter of personality. At a recent (unsuccessful) job interview I was speaking with the principal of the firm and he told me that to succeed in architecture takes a certain pushyness or willingness to go beyond what is being asked in order to thrive. I'm not sure that I actually have this sort of personal attribute, or otherwise that I come across personally or professionally as having this sort of personality attribute. I'm also not entirely sure if I can feesibly change my personality, attitude etc. at least not immediately, and perhaps not sustainably for the long term.

Sorry I have probably not offered much in the way of empathy by talking about myself for a couple of paragrahps but I do hope that this anxiety doesn't get you down.
post #15643 of 21416
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post

I think it's easy for a younger sibling to say that they're disappointed with their elder

Being the oldest male child in a family does come with inherent traditions, some cultures more than others but the expectations always weigh heavy on the eldest boy.

Don't do drugs. Live your life. You'll be fine.

Let's face it, any parent has a favorite child and sibling rivalry may be cyclical as the years pass, perhaps diminishing as you reach a wiser, advanced age.

After my well accomplished patriarchal cousin passed away suddenly at the age of 56, I was thrust onto the stage as the oldest surviving male out of a pack of 30+ cousins, in addition to my position as oldest male boy in the immediate family.

All my siblings are pro, I chose the less formal path in life.
I know for sure there won't be 700 people at my funeral...ha ha!
post #15644 of 21416
Sibling issues is a very, VERY old story (Remember Cain & Abel?) I'm the youngest of 3 kids. From my perspective, my older siblings had it far better than I did. I have always been the "baby" - bossed around by everyone else in the family - it was more like having 4 parents than 2 siblings. My older brother got everything new - and I got all the hand-me-downs. He went to a very expensive private university - but when it was my turn for college, there wasn't any money, so I went to a state college. They gave both of us the same amount of money to help buy our first cars - which seems fair - until you realize that in the 8 years between us, the price of cars had doubled. The same thing happened after we each got married and purchased our first house - "fair" wasn't really quite so fair. And grandkids? My parents did EVERYTHING when my siblings had kids. When my kids were born, my parents were older - and that difference of 8+ years was very significant - they had gone from being energetic retirees to being elderly people with many medical issues. My father went to nearly every little league game for his first born grandson. I think he saw 2 games in the 4 years my son played ball.

So, yeah - being the first born can be very stressful, but being the last born and living under the shadow of the exalted elder siblings is also no picnic. I'm the "black sheep" in our family for not spending every holiday with my family. My siblings see my Mom every week (My Dad has passed) and I see her every few months. I think I learned to be more independent of my parents than my siblings - because I had to be.

A long way to say: we all have our own crosses to bear...
post #15645 of 21416
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post

Can't sleep last night. Read some post on how someone was disappointed with his brother and lost respect to him. That hurt me more than I thought possible. Must be that's what my deepest fear as the eldest off 5 siblings, away for a long time from home.

I can see it in myself too. Out of uni, continuing with higher education. Didn't finish it. Looking for a job for two years later, dodging any questions remotely inquiring about that problem. Seemingly doesn't take it seriously. That's what the poster said he is disappointed in his brother. I can posit with 97% certainty it is mostly to keep up a strong facade, since that's what I am doing and what I thought it would look like. But it seems that this could happen...

I think it's easy for a younger sibling to say that they're disappointed with their elder, because they don'f have the extra baggage of being an older sibling. You're not the brightest beacon of hope of your parents. You're not the shining potential hero in the eyes of your siblings. You won't be the head of the family should the inevitable ccomes sooner.

You don't have to think things out a lot and have the liberty to care less.
I am the oldest of 2 on 1 side and 3 on the other and do not relate to this pressure. Unless one does something horrible. Otherwise it means that you have expectations, and that yiu judge siblings according to your standards. We are not perfect but just love each other and try to support more than judge. However I know that my smaller brother feels pressure as he is not really keen on studies while my sister and I did pretty well. I am trying to tell him that, though useful, these diplomas do not guarantee our happiness, far from it...but I know he still feels the pressure.
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