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The diary entries of a little girl in her 30s! ~ Part 2 - Page 1005

post #15061 of 21452
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

HR (in the USA) is very sensitive to anything that could lead to a claim of discrimination in hiring. So, consider two candidates that have nearly identical resumes. Candidate #1 has a portrait showing him to be a white male that is physically fit, and in his 20's. Candidate #2, with essentially the same background and experience has a portrait showing him/her to be NOT a white male in his 20's (choose your own picture for Candidate #2, they could female or non-white or age 50 or overweight or disabled or whatever). The company has only one job opening and offers it to Candidate #1, NOT because of their portrait, but because of some minor difference in their resume (maybe they listed one class that the hiring manager recognized as being somewhat useful and that class was not listed on Candidate #2's resume).

Candidate #2 then files a lawsuit with the state employment agency claiming discrimination in hiring.

So, what does HR do? They immediately eliminate both Candidate #1 & Candidate #2 and hire Candidate #3, who is less qualified, but does not have a portrait on their resume. If there is a REASON for the portrait to be included (eg you are trying to get a job a TV sportscaster), then fine - in that case the job posting will probably specifically request a portfolio of pictures.

Oh I understand now. Thanks for the explanation.
post #15062 of 21452

Hope you guys don't mind me posting some of my iPhone tomfoolery. I was messing around with the panorama setting a week or two ago and got the following results, I really like how the 2nd and 4th one came out. I had a fun time taking them although I'm hazarding a guess, considering I was running all over the place trying to get the best angle/light for my shots, more then a few people probably thought I was a little crazy. All photos were taken in or around the immediate area of a local Starbucks located in an area of Winnipeg called Osborne Village.

 

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/1002728_263883030420626_1839391501_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/988226_263883053753957_1856971628_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/1003676_263883003753962_15609968_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/179789_263882987087297_1016010717_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/1013674_263882917087304_392848183_n.jpg

post #15063 of 21452
Quote:
Originally Posted by RAFA View Post

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

lol ;). The person is being a smart-ass troll.

 

Haha, probably trolling, but such things can happen...

 

Did someone say troll?  biggrin.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post

In light of this, I feel now that I want to pursue the programming side of my field.

 

Where are you thinking of doing this?  smile.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

I have some Audioquest Gibraltars, I can't say they improve the way my speakers sound but they look very nice.

 

I've been asking around about Blue Jean cables.  Seems like they have a lot of fans.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post

Hope you guys don't mind me posting some of my iPhone tomfoolery.

 

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/1002728_263883030420626_1839391501_n.jpg

 

Wow, there is so much sky in Canada!

post #15064 of 21452
Quote:
Originally Posted by warrenpchi View Post


Wow, there is so much sky in Canada!

You should see the plains, rivers, forest and lakes out here. When I'm an old fogey the master plan is sell everything leave the city and kick back into cabin life somewhere on the edge of some unknown small village with a lot of greenery and picturesque body of water nearby. Hopefully my health will still be good enough that I can make my pipe dream become reality.
post #15065 of 21452
Blue Jeans cables are great, I use them all the time. Now that I have those Alexandria X-2s, I'm going to experiment a little with some Audioquest K2s that I bought off fleabay (for ~75% off retail). Even if they don't improve anything, they sure do look like they would.
post #15066 of 21452
Blue Jeans is a good compromise - more acceptable to the cable crowd than Monoprice, but not silly to the non-cable crowd. Probably a good choice for an agnostic... tongue.gif
post #15067 of 21452
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

Blue Jeans is a good compromise - more acceptable to the cable crowd than Monoprice, but not silly to the non-cable crowd. Probably a good choice for an agnostic... tongue.gif

It was relayed to me that Phantom Cable Co cables sold retail by Infinite Cables in Canada were very good for the price. $12 shipping to the States.
post #15068 of 21452
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

Blue Jeans is a good compromise - more acceptable to the cable crowd than Monoprice, but not silly to the non-cable crowd. Probably a good choice for an agnostic... tongue.gif

 

Yeah, BJC and Signal Cable can be relatively inexpensive (Signal Cable has more of a range, but the TOTL costs $99 for their highest price interconnect).  I own cables from both companies and have no complaints.  I also own some rather esoteric snake-oil stuff, but I buy used for usually 1/3 of retail or less.  I also make a lot of my own cables (and give away some).  If I didn't have a little wiggle room to try out different cables, I'd probably make them all myself.  For someone without the skill or inclination to make their own cables, I would probably recommend BJC or Signal Cable before anything else.  

 

*By the way, if anyone wants to attempt to make their own cables and wants some suggestions, send me a PM, and I'd certainly be happy to discuss it.

 


 

I finally set up my LG and a CD player on an end table right next to my couch, and I find I'm getting more solid listening sessions in.  I listened to a couple of Baroness albums this morning and really enjoyed it.  On the docket tonight is a little Gearge Shearing and another dive into the Wagner boxed set.

post #15069 of 21452
It's impressive how the Creative Aurvana Live! still sounds impressive, but there's certain aspect that are outclassed even by the MA350. /rambling
post #15070 of 21452
Quote:
Originally Posted by warrenpchi View Post

Where are you thinking of doing this?  smile.gif

There's three possible options in the US, and so far one in the UK.
post #15071 of 21452
I have to be honest, and I hope I don't offend anyone - I would be careful with "programming" as a career choice. The vast bulk of software development is done outside of the USA & Europe - mostly in India, China & the countries of the former Soviet Union. There is also a recent rise in "near-shore" (near to the USA) development in Central & South America (eg Costa Rica). I talk to tier 1 & 2 IT consulting houses and enterprise software vendors every week - and ALL of them are using off-shore or near-shore resources for their SW development. Sure, there is still plenty of SW being written in the US & Europe, but I think you will find that SW developed in the West is either at smaller, younger shops that have not yet become large enough to use off-shore resources (and are therefore riskier bets) or the SW is not product related - it tends to be written by engineers or other specialists and is used as just one tool to solve a larger problem. In those cases, the company is not hiring a "programmer" or "software developer", they are hiring an engineer or system analyst that also knows how to write some software. Of course, I'm over-generalizing - but this is what I generally see.

I often tell my younger employees: Don't tie yourself to a technology, or a specific company's products or a specific software language. Only do that if you are willing to be a consultant that travels wherever expertise in that specific technology is needed - and then you better hope that your chosen technology never becomes obsolete. I think it is much better to be on the functional side of the game than the technical. If you understand how the money flows through the ERP system, or how the many moving parts in a complex supply chain come together, or how to optimize the throughput of a robotic assembly system with minimum errors - then regardless of what specific brand, system or language is used - you will be useful to the company - and in fact, you will likely be involved in determining what new technology will best meet the company's needs. On the other hand, if you are a specialist in programming a specific robotic controller - then if the company switches to a different controller that uses a completely different methodology, then you have to hope that the company doesn't just dump you and hire a specialist in the new system - (hint, which one do you think a corporation concerned with maximum efficiency at lowest cost will do?) The guy who makes the money is not the guy that has a hammer - it is the guy that knows where to tell the guy with the hammer to make the hit to get the company running!

Sorry - I'm slipping (again) into mentor mode - I bore my employees all the time with this stuff... redface.gif I wish more universities talked about these things - but unless the instructor has actually spent many years in industry, they simply don't have the experience to pass on to their students.
Edited by billybob_jcv - 6/23/13 at 7:48pm
post #15072 of 21452
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

I have to be honest, and I hope I don't offend anyone - I would be careful with "programming" as a career choice. The vast bulk of software development is done outside of the USA & Europe - mostly in India, China & the countries of the former Soviet Union. There is also a recent rise in "near-shore" (near to the USA) development in Central & South America (eg Costa Rica). I talk to tier 1 & 2 IT consulting houses and enterprise software vendors every week - and ALL of them are using off-shore or near-shore resources for their SW development. Sure, there is still plenty of SW being written in the US & Europe, but I think you will find that SW developed in the West is either at smaller, younger shops that have not yet become large enough to use off-shore resources (and are therefore riskier bets) or the SW is not product related - it tends to be written by engineers or other specialists and is used as just one tool to solve a larger problem. In those cases, the company is not hiring a "programmer" or "software developer", they are hiring an engineer or system analyst that also knows how to write some software. Of course, I'm over-generalizing - but this is what I generally see.

I often tell my younger employees: Don't tie yourself to a technology, or a specific company's products or a specific software language. Only do that if you are willing to be a consultant that travels wherever expertise in that specific technology is needed - and then you better hope that your chosen technology never becomes obsolete. I think it is much better to be on the functional side of the game than the technical. If you understand how the money flows through the ERP system, or how the many moving parts in a complex supply chain come together, or how to optimize the throughput of a robotic assembly system with minimum errors - then regardless of what specific brand, system or language is used - you will be useful to the company - and in fact, you will likely be involved in determining what new technology will best meet the company's needs. On the other hand, if you are a specialist in programming a specific robotic controller - then if the company switches to a different controller that uses a completely different methodology, then you have to hope that the company doesn't just dump you and hire a specialist in the new system - (hint, which one do you think a corporation concerned with maximum efficiency at lowest cost will do?) The guy who makes the money is not the guy that has a hammer - it is the guy that knows where to tell the guy with the hammer to make the hit to get the company running!

Sorry - I'm slipping (again) into mentor mode - I bore my employees all the time with this stuff... redface.gif


Good advice.

 

To abbreviate if I may. Applied Technology and Comprehension of Complex Systems is where its atwink.gif

post #15073 of 21452
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

Sorry - I'm slipping (again) into mentor mode - I bore my employees all the time with this stuff... redface.gif I wish more universities talked about these things - but unless the instructor has actually spent many years in industry, they simply don't have the experience to pass on to their students.

x2 on your post being good advice.

Even if the professors have industry experience, my experience has been that they don't really share it all too often. They provide real life examples to illustrate points and tell funny stories but rarely give career advice such as this.

Somewhat similarly to what you said, someone once told me that the people who get ahead with programming are the ones who learn programming to enhance their performance and save time in their non-programming jobs.
Edited by vwinter - 6/23/13 at 8:16pm
post #15074 of 21452
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


I have to be honest, and I hope I don't offend anyone - I would be careful with "programming" as a career choice. The vast bulk of software development is done outside of the USA & Europe - mostly in India, China & the countries of the former Soviet Union. There is also a recent rise in "near-shore" (near to the USA) development in Central & South America (eg Costa Rica). I talk to tier 1 & 2 IT consulting houses and enterprise software vendors every week - and ALL of them are using off-shore or near-shore resources for their SW development. Sure, there is still plenty of SW being written in the US & Europe, but I think you will find that SW developed in the West is either at smaller, younger shops that have not yet become large enough to use off-shore resources (and are therefore riskier bets) or the SW is not product related - it tends to be written by engineers or other specialists and is used as just one tool to solve a larger problem. In those cases, the company is not hiring a "programmer" or "software developer", they are hiring an engineer or system analyst that also knows how to write some software. Of course, I'm over-generalizing - but this is what I generally see.

I often tell my younger employees: Don't tie yourself to a technology, or a specific company's products or a specific software language. Only do that if you are willing to be a consultant that travels wherever expertise in that specific technology is needed - and then you better hope that your chosen technology never becomes obsolete. I think it is much better to be on the functional side of the game than the technical. If you understand how the money flows through the ERP system, or how the many moving parts in a complex supply chain come together, or how to optimize the throughput of a robotic assembly system with minimum errors - then regardless of what specific brand, system or language is used - you will be useful to the company - and in fact, you will likely be involved in determining what new technology will best meet the company's needs. On the other hand, if you are a specialist in programming a specific robotic controller - then if the company switches to a different controller that uses a completely different methodology, then you have to hope that the company doesn't just dump you and hire a specialist in the new system - (hint, which one do you think a corporation concerned with maximum efficiency at lowest cost will do?) The guy who makes the money is not the guy that has a hammer - it is the guy that knows where to tell the guy with the hammer to make the hit to get the company running!

Sorry - I'm slipping (again) into mentor mode - I bore my employees all the time with this stuff... redface.gif I wish more universities talked about these things - but unless the instructor has actually spent many years in industry, they simply don't have the experience to pass on to their students.

 

 

Good advice! Just as I was thinking about Programming to learn new skills and to land a new gig. But, I also want to meet wink_face.gifmonthly expenses. I think I'm going to have to save up some cash and meet with you over at Crustacean - Beverly Hills. Or In-N-Out! tongue.gif As long as we meet. I could learn a thing or two from you (sorely understated). Been out of employment for some time, as I cared for a loved-one 24/7. Who sadly, joined the ancestors recently. My life and career now starts anew.

post #15075 of 21452
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post

Good advice! Just as I was thinking about Programming to learn new skills and to land a new gig. But, I also want to meet wink_face.gif
monthly expenses. I think I'm going to have to save up some cash and meet with you over at Crustacean - Beverly Hills. Or In-N-Out! 
tongue.gif
 As long as we meet. I could learn a thing or two from you (sorely understated). Been out of employment for some time, as I cared for a loved-one 24/7. Who sadly, joined the ancestors recently. My life and career now starts anew.

Are you going to the LA Meet? If so, then I'll see you there!
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