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The diary entries of a little girl in her 30s! ~ Part 2 - Page 1004  

post #15046 of 21761

Haha, probably trolling, but such things can happen...

post #15047 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by RAFA View Post

Saw this on the first page of this thread. Is it true?

 

Read the source.

post #15048 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

 

Read the source.

People seem really happy with their Audioquest cables. Actually I wanted to know if Aretha Franklin farted on one of her tracks.

post #15049 of 21761

I recommend checking the customer reviews.

post #15050 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

I recommend checking the customer reviews.

 

Ok, I found the comments.

post #15051 of 21761
Reflection corner

I just got back from lunch with two mates of mine: one going to sit for his presentation this Tuesday for his bachelors degree, and the other is a senior that's finishing his diplom (not diploma) later this winter. We had a chat on what, where and how are we going to steer our future. It's amazing to hear that he had already planned his life for the next 10 years: what options he have after graduation, what does each of the options have further, and in comparison, and which I agree with, he said that most of my batch, i.e. the ones that're finishing our bachelor's degree this summer, are still "premature", in a sense that we are directionless.

His words are still stewing in my head.

I feel like after talking to someone, and just lay bare, like that helps me to think some more. That's something that I find daunting, to be honest, since that means showing whatever insecurities I have to those that I do not trust, or do not want to break trust with. That includes my parents too, sadly. Considering that I am the eldest of 5 siblings, maybe it makes sense that I want to show a strong facade in front of them, but then, just keeping my problems to my own isn't going to help anybody.

In light of this, I feel now that I want to pursue the programming side of my field. Sure there's the economic side and the management side of things, but ever since I was thought a bit of programming back in my first year, through Turbo pascal, and that a bit more basic with nary any specific software, I've been one of the first in my group to grasp it, I've been one that really looks forward to the classes (even if that means I have to wake up 2 hours prior at 0630), and for what it's worth with what I was taught, I've been one of the highest scoring.

For what it's worth, I'll just say what my course(?) was, translated of course: Control systems, informatics and electropower systems, major in automatic and intelligent control systems. Bachelor of Sci. (Eng) degree in automation and control.
Edited by jgray91 - 6/23/13 at 5:47am
post #15052 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

My interpretation of the "old & new" theme...
Old! (Click to show)

Yes.

No.

J.L. Hooker is awesome. The BEP... not so much. wink.gif
post #15053 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by RAFA View Post

People seem really happy with their Audioquest cables. Actually I wanted to know if Aretha Franklin farted on one of her tracks.

I have some Audioquest Gibraltars, I can't say they improve the way my speakers sound but they look very nice.
post #15054 of 21761

ph34r.gif No dignity for The Queen of Soul?

post #15055 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzerdave View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post

blink.gif Say what confused.gif

 

Some will take "the other side" to mean the afterlife or something along those lines.  Context clues indicate otherwise, but it's a phrase with plenty of meanings.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post

He was just teasing you based on your play of words in your post

 

biggrin.gif Yes, that was my interpretation... and wink_face.gif playful reply.

 

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by james444 View Post

Re mixtape

 

One of my favorite bands that brought traditional (eastern) rhythms and instruments to modern dance music would be Transglobal Underground:

 

 

OH, we luv us some Natacha Atlas... wink.gif

post #15056 of 21761
Something interesting that kalbee linked. http://www.newjelly.com/projectdetail.aspx?ProjectId=668

The gist: a truly wood headphones: barring the speaker element and wiring, everything is wood.
post #15057 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post

Reflection corner

I just got back from lunch with two mates of mine: one going to sit for his presentation this Tuesday for his bachelors degree, and the other is a senior that's finishing his diplom (not diploma) later this winter. We had a chat on what, where and how are we going to steer our future. It's amazing to hear that he had already planned his life for the next 10 years: what options he have after graduation, what does each of the options have further, and in comparison, and which I agree with, he said that most of my batch, i.e. the ones that're finishing our bachelor's degree this summer, are still "premature", in a sense that we are directionless.

His words are still stewing in my head.

I feel like after talking to someone, and just lay bare, like that helps me to think some more. That's something that I find daunting, to be honest, since that means showing whatever insecurities I have to those that I do not trust, or do not want to break trust with. That includes my parents too, sadly. Considering that I am the eldest of 5 siblings, maybe it makes sense that I want to show a strong facade in front of them, but then, just keeping my problems to my own isn't going to help anybody.

In light of this, I feel now that I want to pursue the programming side of my field. Sure there's the economic side and the management side of things, but ever since I was thought a bit of programming back in my first year, through Turbo pascal, and that a bit more basic with nary any specific software, I've been one of the first in my group to grasp it, I've been one that really looks forward to the classes (even if that means I have to wake up 2 hours prior at 0630), and for what it's worth with what I was taught, I've been one of the highest scoring.

For what it's worth, I'll just say what my course(?) was, translated of course: Control systems, informatics and electropower systems, major in automatic and intelligent control systems. Bachelor of Sci. (Eng) degree in automation and control.

In my last year before getting a BS in Aero Engr, I really didn't know exactly what I wanted to do. Sure, I knew I wanted to be in aerospace, but after that, I had no idea what specific role I wanted. I was lucky, the father of a college friend of mine was a manager at a major aerospace company, and he just happened to be picked to come to my university to conduct interviews & recruiting. I had never met him and he did not know who I was - but when he found out I knew his son, he made some phone calls and set-up interviews with a department that he thought could use me. That chance act of kindness started my career and the path I would take for the rest of my life that has led me to what I do now - which is NOT in aerospace and NOT even in engineering - but each career move I have made can be traced directly back to that initial starting point.

I guess the point I'm trying to make is that you don't need to have the next 10 years of your career planned out. When I was a senior in college, I sure as heck would never have predicted I would be doing what I do now - yet looking back almost 30 years, it makes sense that I could get here - it was a natural transition, and there were no large shifts in direction. So, any plan I might have concocted when I was a senior would have been pure fantasy.

Now that I am in a position to hire young people, I often think back to that act of kindness by my friend's father. And I can say this: Having a general idea of what you would like to do is great - it will help a company recruiter decide if you would be a good fit for what they are looking for at the moment - HOWEVER, that is probably not how the hiring manager will make his decision. When I am looking to hire a new grad, the primary criteria I use is the attitude of the candidate. I'm willing to assume that your new degree means you have some skill within your field. But that's pretty much all I'm willing to assume - the specific classes you took and even your senior project is largely irrelevant to me. What I really want to know is whether you have a passion for learning MY business and what WE do. If you project an attitude of eagerness to learn and to make a contribution to my team, that will take you much farther with me than any specific class you have taken or topic of study you believe you are proficient in. I want energetic, anxious to get to work and flexible - but not cocky, obnoxious or weird. Look professional, act professional and be genuinely interested in what you can do to help me, not in what I can offer you.

And my final advice: Remember that every step in the recruiting and hiring process is NOT designed to find the best candidate, but rather to filter out candidates so that only 1 or 2 remain. It is amazing how many people do not realize this. The way to get an offer is to be the last candidate standing. Do NOT give that first HR screener a reason to eliminate you - and then do the same at each step past that first gate. This means don't try any gimmicks to get noticed and don't put things on your resume that are automatic red flags (like a picture of yourself, your age, your hobbies, etc). The HR screener is looking for those red flags FIRST, then they are going to look for key words in your resume that match the open job descriptions. So - also think about the key words in your resume. Don't put specific product brands and model numbers - use more generic terms (or best of all, regurgitate the terms in the posted job description right back to them). For example, if you say "Proficient in Turbo Pascal", then that only works if I happen to use Turbo Pascal. However, if you say "Proficient in structured and object-oriented programming languages", then you have a better chance of fitting my job description.

Good luck!
post #15058 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

In my last year before getting a BS in Aero Engr, I really didn't know exactly what I wanted to do. Sure, I knew I wanted to be in aerospace, but after that, I had no idea what specific role I wanted. I was lucky, the father of a college friend of mine was a manager at a major aerospace company, and he just happened to be picked to come to my university to conduct interviews & recruiting. I had never met him and he did not know who I was - but when he found out I knew his son, he made some phone calls and set-up interviews with a department that he thought could use me. That chance act of kindness started my career and the path I would take for the rest of my life that has led me to what I do now - which is NOT in aerospace and NOT even in engineering - but each career move I have made can be traced directly back to that initial starting point.

I guess the point I'm trying to make is that you don't need to have the next 10 years of your career planned out. When I was a senior in college, I sure as heck would never have predicted I would be doing what I do now - yet looking back almost 30 years, it makes sense that I could get here - it was a natural transition, and there were no large shifts in direction. So, any plan I might have concocted when I was a senior would have been pure fantasy.

Now that I am in a position to hire young people, I often think back to that act of kindness by my friend's father. And I can say this: Having a general idea of what you would like to do is great - it will help a company recruiter decide if you would be a good fit for what they are looking for at the moment - HOWEVER, that is probably not how the hiring manager will make his decision. When I am looking to hire a new grad, the primary criteria I use is the attitude of the candidate. I'm willing to assume that your new degree means you have some skill within your field. But that's pretty much all I'm willing to assume - the specific classes you took and even your senior project is largely irrelevant to me. What I really want to know is whether you have a passion for learning MY business and what WE do. If you project an attitude of eagerness to learn and to make a contribution to my team, that will take you much farther with me than any specific class you have taken or topic of study you believe you are proficient in. I want energetic, anxious to get to work and flexible - but not cocky, obnoxious or weird. Look professional, act professional and be genuinely interested in what you can do to help me, not in what I can offer you.

And my final advice: Remember that every step in the recruiting and hiring process is NOT designed to find the best candidate, but rather to filter out candidates so that only 1 or 2 remain. It is amazing how many people do not realize this. The way to get an offer is to be the last candidate standing. Do NOT give that first HR screener a reason to eliminate you - and then do the same at each step past that first gate. This means don't try any gimmicks to get noticed and don't put things on your resume that are automatic red flags (like a picture of yourself, your age, your hobbies, etc). The HR screener is looking for those red flags FIRST, then they are going to look for key words in your resume that match the open job descriptions. So - also think about the key words in your resume. Don't put specific product brands and model numbers - use more generic terms (or best of all, regurgitate the terms in the posted job description right back to them). For example, if you say "Proficient in Turbo Pascal", then that only works if I happen to use Turbo Pascal. However, if you say "Proficient in structured and object-oriented programming languages", then you have a better chance of fitting my job description.

Good luck!

Thanks for the advice!

One thing:
I haven't started to write my resume yet (which I should ASAP), but others from my same courses (and other courses) have written theirs, and the only thing that I clearly remember what they were told to put in was what subjects they took in their courses and their portrait. Why is it putting a portrait considered a red flag?
post #15059 of 21761
post #15060 of 21761
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post

Thanks for the advice!

One thing:
I haven't started to write my resume yet (which I should ASAP), but others from my same courses (and other courses) have written theirs, and the only thing that I clearly remember what they were told to put in was what subjects they took in their courses and their portrait. Why is it putting a portrait considered a red flag?

HR (in the USA) is very sensitive to anything that could lead to a claim of discrimination in hiring. So, consider two candidates that have nearly identical resumes. Candidate #1 has a portrait showing him to be a white male that is physically fit, and in his 20's. Candidate #2, with essentially the same background and experience has a portrait showing him/her to be NOT a white male in his 20's (choose your own picture for Candidate #2, they could female or non-white or age 50 or overweight or disabled or whatever). The company has only one job opening and offers it to Candidate #1, NOT because of their portrait, but because of some minor difference in their resume (maybe they listed one class that the hiring manager recognized as being somewhat useful and that class was not listed on Candidate #2's resume).

Candidate #2 then files a lawsuit with the state employment agency claiming discrimination in hiring.

So, what does HR do? They immediately eliminate both Candidate #1 & Candidate #2 and hire Candidate #3, who is less qualified, but does not have a portrait on their resume. If there is a REASON for the portrait to be included (eg you are trying to get a job a TV sportscaster), then fine - in that case the job posting will probably specifically request a portfolio of pictures.
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