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The diary entries of a little girl in her 30s! ~ Part 2 - Page 673  

post #10081 of 21760

post #10082 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by wink View Post

Ed Gerhard...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wink View Post

Here's a posting for MrViolin....

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/518686/this-joke-is-totally-awesome/600#post_9353435

you've been quite active lately. Even going over to the animu thread yourself. I've yet to read those posts carefully...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magick Man View Post

It was 72F here today, gorgeous weather. My joints are happy.

72? too hot. unless you have a breeze :D

 

Speaking of fda.... fry dat arse? Feel da arse?  Hmmm... Food doping administration? Or was it Forget drugs administration...Ah yes, food drug administration. 

post #10083 of 21760

@wink's link

You sir, are too funny for your own good. Couldn't stop laughing. 

 

Edit:

LL2 audition 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/659881/liquid-lightning-mkii-audition-program


Edited by MrViolin - 4/14/13 at 2:31pm
post #10084 of 21760

Back from my trip to Canberra!

 

The beer festival was awesome. Sometimes people seem surprised when I tell them I drink beer - in the same way some people seem to expect me to listen to a lot of classical music. Sometimes I don't even know which stereotype I'm supposed to be part of from moment to moment.  I've figured out over time that I actually do like beer; I just prefer ales and stouts. I got some awesome ginger beer and something called 'Mudgee Mud' to take back home. Very chocolatey thick stout, creamy and awesome.

 

Canberra has a reputation for being horribly boring and a place no one would ever want to go unless they were being forced. For those who don't know, Canberra is the capital city of Australia which was essentially built in the middle of nowhere because the two rival major cities Melbourne and Sydney refused to let the other be the capital. It's situated between the two cities and exists out of geographic and political convenience. As you can imagine for a small city where the major employer is the federal government, it's fairly sedate. 

 

However this trip around I actually got to see some of the local night life scene in Canberra, and it was cool to see everyone was laid back with a diverse mix of peeps. (Everyone in Canberra actually seems pretty wonky / geeky - I have never seen so many video game franchise related T-Shirts). Compared to Melbourne (which is still nice but very hipster / cliquey) or Sydney (which seems to has a feel of aggressive 'business sleaze' at times) Canberra seems like a place where no one seems to have anything in particular to prove. I think nice comfortable civil servant jobs help in that regard.

 

I did not get a chance to visit what is apparently Canberra's only gay club, so that's something for next time.

 

We ate at this American style smoke house (called Smoque BLUERGH I HATE THAT NAME) and it was really wonderful. For some reason I love American food (anything from diners to bbq's) and I have no idea why beyond the fact that it instills in me a nostalgia for experiences that I have no first-hand knowledge of. It's kind of why I like going to Costco I guess, it's like an amusement park version of a place I have only learnt of in myths and legends. I finally got to try cornbread for the first time and it was truly very awesome. Also had Mac n' cheese which was delightful. I think I would make the trip back to Canberra to have that meal again. (Though next time I will order the ultimate platter and get the wings!)

 

That's my show and tell for this weekend. Thanks to everyone who suggested names for the club lol. I think we might just got with the 'Audio Club' since it's relatively innocuous and easily identifiable.

 

Here is something awesome: emergent computer AI playing a nightmare version of Mario.

 


Edited by a_recording - 4/14/13 at 5:52pm
post #10085 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

Back from my trip to Canberra!

 

The beer festival was awesome. Sometimes people seem surprised when I tell them I drink beer - in the same way some people seem to expect me to listen to a lot of classical music. Sometimes I don't even know which stereotype I'm supposed to be part of from moment to moment.  I've figured out over time that I actually do like beer; I just prefer ales and stouts. I got some awesome ginger beer and something called 'Mudgee Mud' to take back home. Very chocolatey thick stout, creamy and awesome.

 

Canberra has a reputation for being horribly boring and a place no one would ever want to go unless they were being forced. For those who don't know, Canberra is the capital city of Australia which was essentially built in the middle of nowhere because the two rival major cities Melbourne and Sydney refused to let the other be the capital. It's situated between the two cities and exists out of geographic and political convenience. As you can imagine for a small city where the major employer is the federal government, it's fairly sedate. 

 

However this trip around I actually got to see some of the local night life scene in Canberra, and it was cool to see everyone was laid back with a diverse mix of peeps. (Everyone in Canberra actually seems pretty wonky / geeky - I have never seen so many video game franchise related T-Shirts). Compared to Melbourne (which is still nice but very hipster / cliquey) or Sydney (which seems to has a feel of aggressive 'business sleaze' at times) Canberra seems like a place where no one seems to have anything in particular to prove. I think nice comfortable civil servant jobs help in that regard.

 

I did not get a chance to visit what is apparently Canberra's only gay club, so that's something for next time.

 

We ate at this American style smoke house (called Smoque BLUERGH I HATE THAT NAME) and it was really wonderful. For some reason I love American food (anything from diners to bbq's) and I have no idea why beyond the fact that it instills in me a nostalgia for experiences that I have no first-hand knowledge of. It's kind of why I like going to Costco I guess, it's like an amusement park version of a place I have only learnt of in myths and legends. I finally got to try cornbread for the first time and it was truly very awesome. Also had Mac n' cheese which was delightful. I think I would make the trip back to Canberra to have that meal again. (Though next time I will order the ultimate platter and get the wings!)

 

That's my show and tell for this weekend. Thanks to everyone who suggested names for the club lol. I think we might just got with the 'Audio Club' since it's relatively innocuous and easily identifiable.

 

Here is something awesome: emergent computer AI playing a nightmare version of Mario.

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

 

I agree with the top comment of that video: arguably one of the most stressful things I've seen today. Just.....wow.

 

 

BTW you just gave me quite the culture shock as an American. Thinking of things like diners and Costco being foreign is absolutely unknown to me. You could have some AMAZING food in the South, everything is full of calories and love :) Though to this day I don't think I've seen a more bewildered look from someone until I went up north and asked for a sweet tea. It was this "Are you.......are you serious?" kind of look and it made me realize how different cultures are even in one nation, especially one that had its cultural markers set on the east coast by a civil war.

 

What are some common foods in Australia?

post #10086 of 21760
Quote:

Originally Posted by mosshorn View Post
 

BTW you just gave me quite the culture shock as an American. Thinking of things like diners and Costco being foreign is absolutely unknown to me. You could have some AMAZING food in the South, everything is full of calories and love :) Though to this day I don't think I've seen a more bewildered look from someone until I went up north and asked for a sweet tea. It was this "Are you.......are you serious?" kind of look and it made me realize how different cultures are even in one nation, especially one that had its cultural markers set on the east coast by a civil war.

 

What are some common foods in Australia?

 

What's sweet tea? :0

 

Australia doesn't really have a particular native cuisine - it's all been derived from English roots mostly. The 'traditional' Australian meal would surely be the BBQ (the ol Shrimp on the barbie), with other Australian innovations like the pie floater or Vegemite.

 

The flip side of this though is that because of Australia's place in the Asia-Pacific we have access to all kinds of nice seafood and the influences of many different cultures. Thai food is arguably Australia's 'real' national cuisine, though I think Thai food in Australia is probably sweeter and less spicy than authentic stuff. There is all kinds of foods available and many fusions from different cultures. Korean and Japanese are readily available and yum, and there's been something of a 'foodie revolution' as TV shows like Masterchef have really popularised the idea of eating as a recreational activity. (Along with people taking photos of their food, which makes me cringe a little even when I sometimes do it myself). There's a bad side to this though; there are many hipster eateries being opened in Sydney (think deconstructed ceilings, no bookings, etc) where the food is incredibly poor value derivative versions of the food it ironically tries to copy. Thai fusion food that is just tangy and sugary to the point of tasting like candy, or deconstructed burgers that taste like McDonalds but cost like fine dining (the competent kind).

 

Recently I went to a Surry Hills American diner style place and they had peanut butter milkshakes. They were $8, which really hurt, but man oh man were they good. I feel the same way about Ben and Jerry's Peanut Butter Swirl.

 

I have to say though that Chinese food (or Cantonese food in particular) seems quite poor value in Australia compared to Hong Kong because of the lack of competition. 

post #10087 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achmedisdead View Post

Captain Kirk's guide to fighting....biggrin.gif


http://imgur.com/gallery/YGgY0
The double fist is the quintessential Kirk move.
post #10088 of 21760

Game of Thrones. Whoa. 

 

Whoa.

post #10089 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

Back from my trip to Canberra!

 

The beer festival was awesome. Sometimes people seem surprised when I tell them I drink beer - in the same way some people seem to expect me to listen to a lot of classical music. Sometimes I don't even know which stereotype I'm supposed to be part of from moment to moment.  I've figured out over time that I actually do like beer; I just prefer ales and stouts. I got some awesome ginger beer and something called 'Mudgee Mud' to take back home. Very chocolatey thick stout, creamy and awesome.

 

Canberra has a reputation for being horribly boring and a place no one would ever want to go unless they were being forced. For those who don't know, Canberra is the capital city of Australia which was essentially built in the middle of nowhere because the two rival major cities Melbourne and Sydney refused to let the other be the capital. It's situated between the two cities and exists out of geographic and political convenience. As you can imagine for a small city where the major employer is the federal government, it's fairly sedate. 

 

However this trip around I actually got to see some of the local night life scene in Canberra, and it was cool to see everyone was laid back with a diverse mix of peeps. (Everyone in Canberra actually seems pretty wonky / geeky - I have never seen so many video game franchise related T-Shirts). Compared to Melbourne (which is still nice but very hipster / cliquey) or Sydney (which seems to has a feel of aggressive 'business sleaze' at times) Canberra seems like a place where no one seems to have anything in particular to prove. I think nice comfortable civil servant jobs help in that regard.

 

I did not get a chance to visit what is apparently Canberra's only gay club, so that's something for next time.

 

We ate at this American style smoke house (called Smoque BLUERGH I HATE THAT NAME) and it was really wonderful. For some reason I love American food (anything from diners to bbq's) and I have no idea why beyond the fact that it instills in me a nostalgia for experiences that I have no first-hand knowledge of. It's kind of why I like going to Costco I guess, it's like an amusement park version of a place I have only learnt of in myths and legends. I finally got to try cornbread for the first time and it was truly very awesome. Also had Mac n' cheese which was delightful. I think I would make the trip back to Canberra to have that meal again. (Though next time I will order the ultimate platter and get the wings!)

 

 

 

That's my show and tell for this weekend. Thanks to everyone who suggested names for the club lol. I think we might just got with the 'Audio Club' since it's relatively innocuous and easily identifiable.

 

 

 

Welcome back! Much success to your audio club.

post #10090 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by mosshorn View Post

BTW you just gave me quite the culture shock as an American. Thinking of things like diners and Costco being foreign is absolutely unknown to me. You could have some AMAZING food in the South, everything is full of calories and love :) Though to this day I don't think I've seen a more bewildered look from someone until I went up north and asked for a sweet tea. It was this "Are you.......are you serious?" kind of look and it made me realize how different cultures are even in one nation, especially one that had its cultural markers set on the east coast by a civil war.

 

One of the things I've been casually interested in is how certain foods get ascribed to regions. As distinguished from foods that are actually distinct to regions. For example, I'd never heard of a Detroit style pizza until I moved out of Michigan (as far as I can tell, it's more or less an old-style Domino's or Little Caesar's pizza, with thick undercooked dough and sweet tomato sauce). Montreal has Michigan-style hot dogs, while Michigan has Coneys (or Koneys), after Coney Island.

 

I'd be curious to see what Australians consider American-style barbeque. In the States, BBQ can be (roughly) divided into four zones: No BBQ, Ribs, Pulled Pork, and Brisket (to forestall argument among fellow Americans: this is a gross approximation and boundaries between zones are not clearly drawn). People in the no BBQ territory -- most of the northern U.S. -- use "bbq" as a generic term for cooking any kind of meat on a grill, usually hamburgers and hot dogs. I live in pulled pork territory right now -- and even here there are fierce adherents to the various regionally-defined "correct" notions of barbeque: Tomato-based sauce (western North Carolina), vinegar-based sauce (eastern North Carolina), or mustard-based sauce (parts of South Carolina). Pulled pork as a form of BBQ is largely unknown to northerners, who typically assume proper southern-style BBQ is unilaterally pork ribs or beef ribs, usually with a sweet sauce glaze. And on and on...

 

When we visited Seoul last fall, we planned to hit one of the American-style restaurants. It didn't happen, even though hamburger chains (mostly Lotte, some Burger King and McDonald's) are ubiquitous. Not as common as coffee shops, though... We did get to visit the Seoul Costco (in Gangnam). My American Costco membership works there, remarkably enough. It was insane... like a standard American Costco store, evaporated and distilled. Apparently it's Costco's most profitable location.

post #10091 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

 

I'd be curious to see what Australians consider American-style barbeque. In the States, BBQ can be (roughly) divided into four zones: No BBQ, Ribs, Pulled Pork, and Brisket 

 

Well, this is probably some kind of horrible transgression then, because the platter I had featured ribs, pulled pork AND brisket lol.

post #10092 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

 

What's sweet tea? :0

 

Australia doesn't really have a particular native cuisine - it's all been derived from English roots mostly. The 'traditional' Australian meal would surely be the BBQ (the ol Shrimp on the barbie), with other Australian innovations like the pie floater or Vegemite.

 

The flip side of this though is that because of Australia's place in the Asia-Pacific we have access to all kinds of nice seafood and the influences of many different cultures. Thai food is arguably Australia's 'real' national cuisine, though I think Thai food in Australia is probably sweeter and less spicy than authentic stuff. There is all kinds of foods available and many fusions from different cultures. Korean and Japanese are readily available and yum, and there's been something of a 'foodie revolution' as TV shows like Masterchef have really popularised the idea of eating as a recreational activity. (Along with people taking photos of their food, which makes me cringe a little even when I sometimes do it myself). There's a bad side to this though; there are many hipster eateries being opened in Sydney (think deconstructed ceilings, no bookings, etc) where the food is incredibly poor value derivative versions of the food it ironically tries to copy. Thai fusion food that is just tangy and sugary to the point of tasting like candy, or deconstructed burgers that taste like McDonalds but cost like fine dining (the competent kind).

 

Recently I went to a Surry Hills American diner style place and they had peanut butter milkshakes. They were $8, which really hurt, but man oh man were they good. I feel the same way about Ben and Jerry's Peanut Butter Swirl.

 

I have to say though that Chinese food (or Cantonese food in particular) seems quite poor value in Australia compared to Hong Kong because of the lack of competition. 

Sweet tea is ice cold black tea that is sweetened with sugar. There are cases where it ends up being slightly more viscous due to all the sugar :O

 

I think the idea of food becoming vogue again is a good idea, especially over here. People are starting to be more aware of what they eat, and the country as a whole is getting less fat. Considering things like peanut butter milkshakes are common place over here, we need that lol

 

 

I'm a big fan of Chocolate Peanut Butter malt milkshakes. MMMMMMMMMM.

post #10093 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by eke2k6 View Post

Game of Thrones. Whoa. 

Whoa.

Silence, I've not seen it yet. It's sitting on the DVR waiting for tomorrow night.
post #10094 of 21760

I'm a big fan of trying to stay on my diet although right now it's becoming a lot harder to do so after reading this page of the thread. I'm salivating at the thought of BBQ steak/ribs/hamburgers/hotdogs. If a cow or pig happened to come trotting by right now their life expectancy would be rather short.

post #10095 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post

I'm a big fan of trying to stay on my diet although right now it's becoming a lot harder to do so after reading this page of the thread. I'm salivating at the thought of BBQ steak/ribs/hamburgers/hotdogs. If a cow or pig happened to come trotting by right now their life expectancy would be rather short.

Pineapples substitutes for meat very well :D

 

I think we're all just hungry as there's tons of food talk on the TMAC thread as well.

 

Apart from fast food I don't really partake in Western meals all that often. 

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