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Simon Cowell says he making the best - Page 5

post #61 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post

Oh dear...

 

You too could look this cool! wif the Xcans!

 

(anyone else notice that ghostly baldman behind him eek.gif)

 

Lol looks like Agent 47 from the Hitman series

post #62 of 83

Simon cowell obviously knows more about pop music than probably anyone else ever. Take note- pop stands for popular- and that's what he continuously has been churning out.

 

But 'popular' headphones- he's got a long way to go it seems.   

post #63 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post

 

Cheesus! biggrin.gif

post #64 of 83
Whey too many cheeses there, you made my stomach curdle.
post #65 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by conkerman View Post

Whey too many cheeses there, you made my stomach curdle.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post

Cheesus! biggrin.gif

 

 

post #66 of 83

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #67 of 83

Hahahahahaha! Aww, ****.

post #68 of 83

lol@Goudacris

post #69 of 83

wonder who will be the next celebrity to endorse headphones?

post #70 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chawanwit View Post

wonder who will be the next celebrity to endorse headphones?

 

PSY L3000.gif

post #71 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chawanwit View Post

wonder who will be the next celebrity to endorse headphones?

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
There is absolutely no end in sight. I guess it's good for headphones in general. This is also really nothing new in 1966 my baseball glove had about twenty signatures on it. Endorsements have always been marketing but new to headphones.
 
 


Edited by Redcarmoose - 9/30/12 at 11:02pm
post #72 of 83

I listened to a pair of these. I know the impulse is to ridicule a product like this because audiophiles make the mistake of thinking their standards for the sound quality of a product are some kind of absolute, which is not true. They're just a taste, and different people have different tastes. Sony is making these cans because there is a demand for them.

 

The sound, as you might expect, hypes the lower frequencies. No surprises there. These headphones have been tuned for experiencing modern hip hop, dance/electronica and dance-pop music. The way these types of music are EQ'd and mastered is that they typically feature sparse arrangements, with high end detail floating over a punchy low end (drums and bass), a lot of (multiband) compression in the mid and high range, and a very much hollowed-out midrange. This is what these headphones are designed to reproduce, and they do an excellent job at it. The bass is huge and well-controlled, with minimal ringing. This gives the impression of very clean and very subjectively loud (if you want it) reproduction. Dynamic range, subjectively, is excellent. Detail retrieval is good, although you don't get the ultimate extension at the high end that you get on some of the better IEMs.

 

These are not the headphones for listening to classical music, or even classic rock. That will sound tubby and opaque with too much low end. If your source lets you EQ the sound, you can readily deal with much of this. But these are not monitors and they are not designed for flat reproduction.

 

Build quality is quite good. Finish is pretty good, could be somewhat better given the pricing. A lot of attention has gone into making these cans comfortable, and they are very easy on the ears. They are not the lightest on-ear headphones, but they are not particularly heavy.

 

I think the price represents reasonable value. They are clearly better than entry-level headphones in the $100-$200 range. I think they compete quite well with and indeed outperform -- if you use them on the kind of music they were intended for -- serious headphones costing more (e.g. Sennheiser, Beyerdynamic or Shure cans in the $300 to $500 range).

 

Agree that you shouldn't buy a product simply because of its connection to a celebrity. Neither should you reject one for that reason. These are good headphones that consumers of this type of music will find very enjoyable.

post #73 of 83

Does anyone know for sure if these are rebranded XB800's? Or are these in fact better-sounding (costing almost double)?

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patekswiss View Post

 

I think the price represents reasonable value. They are clearly better than entry-level headphones in the $100-$200 range. I think they compete quite well with and indeed outperform -- if you use them on the kind of music they were intended for -- serious headphones costing more (e.g. Sennheiser, Beyerdynamic or Shure cans in the $300 to $500 range).

 

Agree that you shouldn't buy a product simply because of its connection to a celebrity. Neither should you reject one for that reason. These are good headphones that consumers of this type of music will find very enjoyable.

 

I agree, but with that logic anything can be competitive, as long as it's good for a few genres.

post #74 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by patekswiss View Post

I listened to a pair of these. I know the impulse is to ridicule a product like this because audiophiles make the mistake of thinking their standards for the sound quality of a product are some kind of absolute, which is not true. They're just a taste, and different people have different tastes. Sony is making these cans because there is a demand for them.

 

The sound, as you might expect, hypes the lower frequencies. No surprises there. These headphones have been tuned for experiencing modern hip hop, dance/electronica and dance-pop music. The way these types of music are EQ'd and mastered is that they typically feature sparse arrangements, with high end detail floating over a punchy low end (drums and bass), a lot of (multiband) compression in the mid and high range, and a very much hollowed-out midrange. This is what these headphones are designed to reproduce, and they do an excellent job at it. The bass is huge and well-controlled, with minimal ringing. This gives the impression of very clean and very subjectively loud (if you want it) reproduction. Dynamic range, subjectively, is excellent. Detail retrieval is good, although you don't get the ultimate extension at the high end that you get on some of the better IEMs.

 

These are not the headphones for listening to classical music, or even classic rock. That will sound tubby and opaque with too much low end. If your source lets you EQ the sound, you can readily deal with much of this. But these are not monitors and they are not designed for flat reproduction.

 

Build quality is quite good. Finish is pretty good, could be somewhat better given the pricing. A lot of attention has gone into making these cans comfortable, and they are very easy on the ears. They are not the lightest on-ear headphones, but they are not particularly heavy.

 

I think the price represents reasonable value. They are clearly better than entry-level headphones in the $100-$200 range. I think they compete quite well with and indeed outperform -- if you use them on the kind of music they were intended for -- serious headphones costing more (e.g. Sennheiser, Beyerdynamic or Shure cans in the $300 to $500 range).

 

Agree that you shouldn't buy a product simply because of its connection to a celebrity. Neither should you reject one for that reason. These are good headphones that consumers of this type of music will find very enjoyable.

 

And impressions like these is what we need instead of incredibly-lame-ass post about cheese...

 

Thanks for the mini-review, welcome to head-fi, and hope you stick around for a while.

post #75 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by patekswiss View Post

I listened to a pair of these. I know the impulse is to ridicule a product like this because audiophiles make the mistake of thinking their standards for the sound quality of a product are some kind of absolute, which is not true. They're just a taste, and different people have different tastes. Sony is making these cans because there is a demand for them.

The sound, as you might expect, hypes the lower frequencies. No surprises there. These headphones have been tuned for experiencing modern hip hop, dance/electronica and dance-pop music. The way these types of music are EQ'd and mastered is that they typically feature sparse arrangements, with high end detail floating over a punchy low end (drums and bass), a lot of (multiband) compression in the mid and high range, and a very much hollowed-out midrange. This is what these headphones are designed to reproduce, and they do an excellent job at it. The bass is huge and well-controlled, with minimal ringing. This gives the impression of very clean and very subjectively loud (if you want it) reproduction. Dynamic range, subjectively, is excellent. Detail retrieval is good, although you don't get the ultimate extension at the high end that you get on some of the better IEMs.

These are not the headphones for listening to classical music, or even classic rock. That will sound tubby and opaque with too much low end. If your source lets you EQ the sound, you can readily deal with much of this. But these are not monitors and they are not designed for flat reproduction.

Build quality is quite good. Finish is pretty good, could be somewhat better given the pricing. A lot of attention has gone into making these cans comfortable, and they are very easy on the ears. They are not the lightest on-ear headphones, but they are not particularly heavy.

I think the price represents reasonable value. They are clearly better than entry-level headphones in the $100-$200 range. I think they compete quite well with and indeed outperform -- if you use them on the kind of music they were intended for -- serious headphones costing more (e.g. Sennheiser, Beyerdynamic or Shure cans in the $300 to $500 range).

Agree that you shouldn't buy a product simply because of its connection to a celebrity. Neither should you reject one for that reason. These are good headphones that consumers of this type of music will find very enjoyable.

What other headphones can you compare them (specific models)?
And I think it also depends on your tastes. I like my HD800 for almost everything but for some people, they might be too bright or not have enough bass, etc.
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