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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 63

post #931 of 8935

 Clearly he was fond of Bach.

post #932 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 


sorry, I remember him saying he wasn't satisfied with his own Bach, not Bach himself, that would be outrageous:D

 

All performers should struggle with Bach I agree, I know Casals and Bylsma did

 

Ok, understood.

post #933 of 8935

You beat me to it, cheers :beerchug: 

 

Some ineteresting stuff about the Bach suites, Rostropovich & more

 

 

http://www.cello.org/Newsletter/Articles/markevitch.htm 


Edited by Quinto - 12/6/13 at 3:33pm
post #934 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

Can someone point me in the direction of good Tchaikovsky recordings? I just want the Symphonies and concertos for now. I have the Evgeny Kissin piano concerto no1 and 2 but maybe there is something better? 

 

I'm looking forward to Tchaikovsky and HD800. :D


Mravinsky is my favorite..for modern recording I personally liked the 5th symphony by Gergiev/Wiener Philharmonic and his 6th with Kirov Orchestra..

 

Celibidache with his Munich is really superb, bit slower then usual but VERY detailed and with great tension buildings..

 

Concertos I can help you, sorry, I do like Tchaikovsky's piano trio Argerich/Maisky/Kremer (live, Shostakovich 2nd trio as a bonus!)

post #935 of 8935

Anything by Dorati, Bernstein in New York, Stokowski... The best complete set of symphonies I've heard is Svetlanov...

 

post #936 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

Anything by Dorati, Bernstein in New York, Stokowski... The best complete set of symphonies I've heard is Svetlanov...

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 


Mravinsky is my favorite..for modern recording I personally liked the 5th symphony by Gergiev/Wiener Philharmonic and his 6th with Kirov Orchestra..

 

Celibidache with his Munich is really superb, bit slower then usual but VERY detailed and with great tension buildings..

 

Concertos I can help you, sorry, I do like Tchaikovsky's piano trio Argerich/Maisky/Kremer (live, Shostakovich 2nd trio as a bonus!)

thanks guys, looking into it now

post #937 of 8935
Quote:

Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post

 

thanks guys, looking into it now

 

My advice: Before you buy all of the Tchaikovsky symphonies and piano concertos, stick to the 4th, 5th, 6th Symphonies and 1st Piano concerto, then try some other composers. I say this not because the rest are less good, but because you might find something you like more.

 

My recommendations, generally from more accesible to less accesible. Try them on youtube, and see if you find a work, composer, or specific mood you like. Have fun :)

If you like piano concertos: (Click to show)
Rachmaninoff 2nd piano concerto(my favorite of all time)
Grieg piano concerto
Rachmaninoff 3rd piano concerto(fantastic, but imho less accesible)
Chopin 2nd piano concerto (try the second movement, very tender, maybe not your thing)
Liszt 1st piano concerto
Brahms 2nd piano concerto
Ravel left hand concerto (VERY dark)
Prokofiev 3rd piano concerto
 
If you like symphonic/orchestral works (Click to show)
Rachmaninoff Vocalise or 1st Symphonic Dances
Dvorak 9th symphony (you'll probably recognize the final movement)
Grieg Peer Gynt Suit No.1
Holst: The planets, jupiter
Wagner: prelude to Tristan und Isolde
Rachmaninoff 2nd symphony
Sibelius 7th Symphony
 
Specific Recs, for Tchaikovsky's 6th and his 1st concerto (Click to show)

For the sixth:

Bernstein(1987) and Mravinsky are on the opposite ends of crazy--Mravinsky increases intensity by speeding up the crescendos and increasing anticipation, while Bernstein wrings out all possible emotion by indulging in slower tempos that lead to massive, impassioned crescendos.

 

Mravinsky's interpretation is hair-raising, Bernstein's 1987 interpretation is dark,brooding, and devastating. (Mravinsky is equally fierce in his readings of the 4th and 5th)

 

For the piano concerto:

The Kissin(I assume with Karajan) is actually one of my favorites, due to its slower, weighty interpretion (not unlike what Bernstein does in the 6th), which many do not like. For a faster, exciting one, try Argerich with ChaillyYevgeny Sudbin is not very well known, but his Tchaikovsky 1st is worth mentioning, for the sensitivity and musicality he presents at the expense of instensity. Ofcourse, my favorite is Pogorelich. Cliburn is fantastic as well.

 

 Are you interested in vocal, violin, or cello works at all? 

post #938 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by 96rubberduckys View Post
 

 

My advice: Before you buy all of the Tchaikovsky symphonies and piano concertos, stick to the 4th, 5th, 6th Symphonies and 1st Piano concerto, then try some other composers. I say this not because the rest are less good, but because you might find something you like more.

 

My recommendations, generally from more accesible to less accesible. Try them on youtube, and see if you find a work, composer, or specific mood you like. Have fun :)

If you like piano concertos: (Click to show)
Rachmaninoff 2nd piano concerto(my favorite of all time)
Grieg piano concerto
Rachmaninoff 3rd piano concerto(fantastic, but imho less accesible)
Chopin 2nd piano concerto (try the second movement, very tender, maybe not your thing)
Liszt 1st piano concerto
Brahms 2nd piano concerto
Ravel left hand concerto (VERY dark)
Prokofiev 3rd piano concerto
 
If you like symphonic/orchestral works (Click to show)
Rachmaninoff Vocalise or 1st Symphonic Dances
Dvorak 9th symphony (you'll probably recognize the final movement)
Grieg Peer Gynt Suit No.1
Holst: The planets, jupiter
Wagner: prelude to Tristan und Isolde
Rachmaninoff 2nd symphony
Sibelius 7th Symphony
 
Specific Recs, for Tchaikovsky's 6th and his 1st concerto (Click to show)

For the sixth:

Bernstein(1987) and Mravinsky are on the opposite ends of crazy--Mravinsky increases intensity by speeding up the crescendos and increasing anticipation, while Bernstein wrings out all possible emotion by indulging in slower tempos that lead to massive, impassioned crescendos.

 

Mravinsky's interpretation is hair-raising, Bernstein's 1987 interpretation is dark,brooding, and devastating. (Mravinsky is equally fierce in his readings of the 4th and 5th)

 

For the piano concerto:

The Kissin(I assume with Karajan) is actually one of my favorites, due to its slower, weighty interpretion (not unlike what Bernstein does in the 6th), which many do not like. For a faster, exciting one, try Argerich with ChaillyYevgeny Sudbin is not very well known, but his Tchaikovsky 1st is worth mentioning, for the sensitivity and musicality he presents at the expense of instensity. Ofcourse, my favorite is Pogorelich. Cliburn is fantastic as well.

 

 Are you interested in vocal, violin, or cello works at all? 

 

Do not underestimate Youtube as a resource to investigate classical composers and performers.

Hopefully it will remain so.

post #939 of 8935

Tchaikovsky's 1st symphony is fantastic. Don't pass that one by.

post #940 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by 96rubberduckys View Post
 

 

My advice: Before you buy all of the Tchaikovsky symphonies and piano concertos, stick to the 4th, 5th, 6th Symphonies and 1st Piano concerto, then try some other composers. I say this not because the rest are less good, but because you might find something you like more.

 

My recommendations, generally from more accesible to less accesible. Try them on youtube, and see if you find a work, composer, or specific mood you like. Have fun :)

If you like piano concertos: (Click to show)
Rachmaninoff 2nd piano concerto(my favorite of all time)
Grieg piano concerto
Rachmaninoff 3rd piano concerto(fantastic, but imho less accesible)
Chopin 2nd piano concerto (try the second movement, very tender, maybe not your thing)
Liszt 1st piano concerto
Brahms 2nd piano concerto
Ravel left hand concerto (VERY dark)
Prokofiev 3rd piano concerto
 
If you like symphonic/orchestral works (Click to show)
Rachmaninoff Vocalise or 1st Symphonic Dances
Dvorak 9th symphony (you'll probably recognize the final movement)
Grieg Peer Gynt Suit No.1
Holst: The planets, jupiter
Wagner: prelude to Tristan und Isolde
Rachmaninoff 2nd symphony
Sibelius 7th Symphony
 
Specific Recs, for Tchaikovsky's 6th and his 1st concerto (Click to show)

For the sixth:

Bernstein(1987) and Mravinsky are on the opposite ends of crazy--Mravinsky increases intensity by speeding up the crescendos and increasing anticipation, while Bernstein wrings out all possible emotion by indulging in slower tempos that lead to massive, impassioned crescendos.

 

Mravinsky's interpretation is hair-raising, Bernstein's 1987 interpretation is dark,brooding, and devastating. (Mravinsky is equally fierce in his readings of the 4th and 5th)

 

For the piano concerto:

The Kissin(I assume with Karajan) is actually one of my favorites, due to its slower, weighty interpretion (not unlike what Bernstein does in the 6th), which many do not like. For a faster, exciting one, try Argerich with ChaillyYevgeny Sudbin is not very well known, but his Tchaikovsky 1st is worth mentioning, for the sensitivity and musicality he presents at the expense of instensity. Ofcourse, my favorite is Pogorelich. Cliburn is fantastic as well.

 

 Are you interested in vocal, violin, or cello works at all? 

Thank you for the post - i am heading into town to see if i can get the bernstein collection in tower records. 

post #941 of 8935

Anyone know if there is a collection of Mahler symphonies worth getting? I have heard of the Chicago symphony orchestra with george solti as conductor. I think it was symphony no5 that i heard in my friends house and it sounded really good to me but is there anything else i should look out for? 

 

maybe this is good?  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gustav-Mahler-Complete-Works-Anniversary/dp/B003D0ZNWY/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1386422403&sr=1-1&keywords=mahler


Edited by magiccabbage - 12/7/13 at 5:21am
post #942 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

Anyone know if there is a collection of Mahler symphonies worth getting? I have heard of the Chicago symphony orchestra with george solti as conductor. I think it was symphony no5 that i heard in my friends house and it sounded really good to me but is there anything else i should look out for? 

 

maybe this is good?  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gustav-Mahler-Complete-Works-Anniversary/dp/B003D0ZNWY/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1386422403&sr=1-1&keywords=mahler

Very nice set indeed

 

I also like Bertini, Tennstedt or both Bernstein sets..

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mahler-Complete-Symphonies-Leonard-Bernstein/dp/B001TIQT98/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1386424277&sr=1-1&keywords=complete+mahler+symphonies+bernstein

 

and others :p 

 

-edit-  Gielen is very nice too but a bit expensive. Levine is cool as well IMO


Edited by Quinto - 12/7/13 at 6:22am
post #943 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Tchaikovsky's 1st symphony is fantastic. Don't pass that one by.
Absolutely! My favourite recordings are Smetacek with the Prague Symphony Orchestra (quirky and characterful Czech orchestral playing) and Maazel with the Vienna Philharmonic.
post #944 of 8935

I don't care much for Solti's Mahler. A little too angsty for me. I like Tennstedt and Walter.

post #945 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

I don't care much for Solti's Mahler. A little too angsty for me. I like Tennstedt and Walter.


I love Solti Mahler especially when I was a kid.

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