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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 56

post #826 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by sh4dowd4ncer View Post
 

A small iTunes research brought me this one.

Back on Pictures subject.

Nice performance + nice recording

Is this the live at Sophia recording?

post #827 of 8942

..

post #828 of 8942

Hum.. I don't know.

The label is "Music Online" and there is really almost nothing on the web about this record.

post #829 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by extrabigmehdi View Post
 

What bothers me a bit with classical music, is the number of interpretations , versions ...

I  mean, I  barely know some classical piece, but if you must additionally care of the orchestra, the conductor ...

I  wonder if you even find time to listen anything else than classical genre.

I 'm a bit surprised for people that "own"  different box of the same composer ,  but with different conductor / orchestra...  I  think "average" people are happy to have at least one version, of each most known classical piece, and then they'll listen to something else.

 

Regarding Ennio Morricone mentioned later on this thread, I  don't consider too much it's classical... because it's too easy listening. Lot of stuff he composed are catchy as hell, I  think everyone won't have difficulty to remind the main "musical idea" of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

THAT was my intimidation/shock/callitwhateveryoulike - when I first time stepped into the really good record store with classical music, HMV in London, at my 17 years of age. I just wanted Tchaikovsky 1st piano concerto - and a very polite man in close to tuxedo started inquring about which pianist, which conductor, which orchestra, which label I am interested in. :confused::eek::mad:. It made me soooo unconfortable, I did not know anything besides Karajan and Deutsche Gramophon ( well maybe some glimses here and there..) at the time - and remember finally making my purchase on the rock department, with Harvest from Neil Young and The Yes Album from Yes - no such ambiguity and feeling of incapabilty of making a purchase through sheer ignorance (at the time). On the positive note - I still had all of my hair at the time !

 

Now I own ( and listen on regular basis and enjoy) more than 10 Second Symphonies by Gustav Mahler - and MANY other double versions of the same work. Thing is, once you start listening more seriously and grow older, if you like classics in the first place, you are likely to start listening to other genres less and less. And the difference between two recordings of the same compositions with two different conductors and the same orchestra may well be more invitinfg than say listening to a rock or jazz (or whatever) recording. Which is not to say that I do not crank up some heavy metal etc from time to time !

 

Good film music is characterized by its next-to-nonexistance - it should so blend with the movie that one does not perceive "music" as such. Morricone, as other greats in the genre, is superb here - and although he may be catchy as hell, may seem on the lightish side, he still has roots in classical music and  adapted it to work well with the film. One can not ask for (much) more.

post #830 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 

Is this the live at Sophia recording?

I think you are talking about this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Sviatoslav-Richter-Sofia-Recital-1958/dp/B0000523QI

 

Unfortunately I am not sure if the one from iTunes that I listened the preview is the same.

 

Cheers

post #831 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

 My point was that some conductors (including Haitink) play Debussy and Ravel as pure music- notes on a page. Munch and Stokowski find atmospheres between the notes. Feelings. Moods. Some music, like Beethoven is great being played as abstract music. 

good point! Rinaldo Alessandrini , said, speaking of Bach, that there is music that does not really need to be performed. If you can read the score, it is all already there, and the musician job is just to produce a beautiful sound, and let the music speak calmly for itself to those who can't read the scores. Performance is important only for music that needs to be "nourished", "sustained".

 

Speaking of Alessandrini and Bach, and back to the main subject of this thread, here is my #1 favorite recording of the 4th and 5th Brandenburg (and a top five recording of the other four...)

post #832 of 8942

If it sounds like it was recorded in a tuberculosis ward, it's the Sophia!

post #833 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

If it sounds like it was recorded in a tuberculosis ward, it's the Sophia!

LOL... 

 

I compared (the preview) with the one from Philips in itunes and it is not the same.

Record, performance and track length. Everything different.

The one from Sophia with a lot of people coughing...

 

Unfortunately the one from Horowitz that you guys mentioned, at least in iTunes, has terrible sound.

This one below:


Edited by sh4dowd4ncer - 11/28/13 at 10:16am
post #834 of 8942

The Horowitz is a live broadcast from 1942 I think. But don't let sound clips fool you. It's an electrifying performance that transcends its age. They made a studio version at around the same time, but it isn't the same. Nothing else is the same as that one. It's like Rubinstein's Moscow recital. You just sit with your jaw on the floor. By the way, since it hasn't been mentioned yet, here is the best classical DVD ever.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Classic-Archive-Rubinstein-Legendary-Recital/dp/B001IMFHVG/

post #835 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post
 if you like classics in the first place, you are likely to start listening to other genres less and less.

well, I'm more curious about different genre than sticking to one in particular.

 

Quote:
And the difference between two recordings of the same compositions with two different conductors and the same orchestra may well be more invitinfg than say listening to a rock or jazz (or whatever) recording.

That seems a bit exaggerated to me.

 

Quote:

Good film music is characterized by its next-to-nonexistance - it should so blend with the movie that one does not perceive "music" as such. Morricone, as other greats in the genre, is superb here - and although he may be catchy as hell, may seem on the lightish side, he still has roots in classical music and  adapted it to work well with the film. One can not ask for (much) more.

 

Well I collected different soundtrack in the hope of discovering interesting stuff, but I must admit that I usually lack the patience to listen one in full extent.

Most soundtrack are inspired by classical , and we have for example  Gustav Holst  that filed a lawsuit against Hans Zimmer (some plagiarized content for the Gladiator soundtrack). I've seen people thinking that soundtrack just usually steal ideas from classical, and that nothing is really new.

 

Oh, and one least thing , I  don't find the titles used in classical piece so much evocative. It's usually the first thing you see before you decide to listen to something : the title & the cover. Frankly when I  read: "Goldberg Variations",  "symphony n°5" , "sonata whatever" , it's not really evocative, and it's just give the feeling that it's more of the same.

post #836 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

The Horowitz is a live broadcast from 1942 I think. But don't let sound clips fool you. It's an electrifying performance that transcends its age. They made a studio version at around the same time, but it isn't the same. Nothing else is the same as that one. It's like Rubinstein's Moscow recital. You just sit with your jaw on the floor. By the way, since it hasn't been mentioned yet, here is the best classical DVD ever.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Classic-Archive-Rubinstein-Legendary-Recital/dp/B001IMFHVG/

thank you, i am looking forward to this. Did you like the kissin recital at all? 

post #837 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by extrabigmehdi View Post
 

well, I'm more curious about different genre than sticking to one in particular.

 

That seems a bit exaggerated to me.

 

Well I collected different soundtrack in the hope of discovering interesting stuff, but I must admit that I usually lack the patience to listen one in full extent.

Most soundtrack are inspired by classical , and we have for example  Gustav Holst  that filed a lawsuit against Hans Zimmer (some plagiarized content for the Gladiator soundtrack). I've seen people thinking that soundtrack just usually steal ideas from classical, and that nothing is really new.

 

Oh, and one least thing , I  don't find the titles used in classical piece so much evocative. It's usually the first thing you see before you decide to listen to something : the title & the cover. Frankly when I  read: "Goldberg Variations",  "symphony n°5" , "sonata whatever" , it's not really evocative, and it's just give the feeling that it's more of the same.

It all depends on one's preferences and - age. I do not mean that young(er) people are incapable of listening and understanding classical music - but - ask yourself that question - what can say a Requiem mean to a teenager with both of his/hers parents AND grandparents still alive ? Also (very) young players might be technically superiour to their elderly peers - but the grind of life, love, pain, loss, etc - are not yet there and they simply have no idea what to do once the composition requires anything of the sort.

 

You can say that listening to other genres is more interesting than two "classicals" and that it is exagerration to say the other way around. I assume you are younger

than me - and also that your attitude regarding this might change with time. I was exactly the same opinion back in my younger days.

 

Well, I do not know exactly how many bars etc are still allowed for the "new" composition not to be accused of plagiarism - but if it enough to require a law case, it is obviously too much. It is VERY hard to invent something not already existing in classical music - particularly something that is palatable to the general movie watching audience. Try in movies music anything like Karlheinz Stockhausen or Vinko Globokar - and you will be out of movie bussines in no time at all. 

 

Lack of patience is the ULTIMATE sin in proper evaluation of music. One has to "digest" music at his/hers own pace - it is impossible to shove it down anyone's "throat" by force, by the exact date. I experience certain music pieces quite differently with the passage of time - that is why several musicians record the same composition(s) more than once during their career - youthful performance will certainly differ from the one of the old age - and there may well be intermediate ones, also worth listening to. 

 

One of the most evocative titles in music I remembered for good is "Several Species of Small Fury Animals Gathered Together in a Cave and Grooving with a Pict" - from the Pink Floyd's album Ummagumma. Classical music has its forms, sonata is different from concerto, symphony, divertimento - etc. Compositions are named - AND - numbered.

In case of more prolific composers, they can be positively identified only by the composer's own numbering system - like http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis BWV 998 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prelude,_Fugue_and_Allegro_in_E-flat_major,_BWV_998 .

 

One runs out of evocative names sooner or later, there can be only so many Prelude(s) to a Faun's Afternoon - namely ONE.

 

post #838 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by extrabigmehdi View Post
 

What bothers me a bit with classical music, is the number of interpretations , versions ...

I  mean, I  barely know some classical piece, but if you must additionally care of the orchestra, the conductor ...

I  wonder if you even find time to listen anything else than classical genre.

I 'm a bit surprised for people that "own"  different box of the same composer ,  but with different conductor / orchestra...  I  think "average" people are happy to have at least one version, of each most known classical piece, and then they'll listen to something else.

 

Regarding Ennio Morricone mentioned later on this thread, I  don't consider too much it's classical... because it's too easy listening. Lot of stuff he composed are catchy as hell, I  think everyone won't have difficulty to remind the main "musical idea" of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

 

I've met many people who feel the same as you.

I know a couple of record collectors who actually get stressed out and worry whether

they are listening to correct or definitive version.

 

I like to think of the classical repertoire as a vast life long process of discovery.

post #839 of 8942

Gustav Holst came back from the dead to sue Hans Zimmer! He should have come back earlier and sued John Williams!

post #840 of 8942

 

I like the Goebel version too.

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