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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 54

post #796 of 8942

Speaking of opinions, this piece was cited by Beethoven to be one of the best(and I'm not referring to Mozart)

 

 

There are arguably better versions of this music but for personal reasons I like it most.

post #797 of 8942

wow this thread is moving fast. This album has probably been talked about 100 times but i am only discovering it now. The Rostropovich documentary was very moving and made me want to hear this. Also i just got my hd800's today and this album sounds amazing with them. 

 

post #798 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

wow this thread is moving fast. This album has probably been talked about 100 times but i am only discovering it now. The Rostropovich documentary was very moving and made me want to hear this. Also i just got my hd800's today and this album sounds amazing with them. 

 

 

Never heard this but It's probably amazing considering the history between Britten and Rostropovich.

post #799 of 8942

I'll post this just because Bigshot doesn't like Boulez:

(And it's an amazing account of these pieces).

post #800 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

I'll post this just because Bigshot doesn't like Boulez:

(And it's an amazing account of these pieces).

 

I've got that on vinyl, it's terrific. :)

post #801 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by amigomatt View Post

..............t.

Back to piano stuff, I have an old vinyl of the Liszt B minor sonata played by John Ogdon. That was the disc that got me into piano music and I've never heard a performance since that has satisfied me in the same way. I'm not sure you can even get hold of it now, but it really is something else.

The Liszt B minor sonata by Martha Argerich did the same thing for me, but I will check out Ogdon..

post #802 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post

The Liszt B minor sonata by Martha Argerich did the same thing for me, but I will check out Ogdon..
Haha! Coincidentally, Quinto, it was the talk about Argerich that prompted me to mention the Ogdon Liszt! I have her rendition with some other things on DG and I really liked it and was going to mention it, then remembered that Ogdon disc! If you can't get hold of it, I'd be happy to run it off my deck into digital format for you. Let me know. The Ogdon is special. To my ears and heart, he speaks the music in a very moving way.
Edited by amigomatt - 11/27/13 at 1:15pm
post #803 of 8942

Ogdon's 1964 recording of Liszt Sonata availabe in UK in these boxed sets :
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/EMI/7046372
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/EMI/3927472

And 1976 recital in Moscow :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8q1tNCVGpt0

post #804 of 8942

I have the Boulez Debussy. I really like Munch and Stokowski. They have a lot more technicolor flair.

post #805 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

I have the Boulez Debussy. I really like Munch and Stokowski. They have a lot more technicolor flair.

 

For some reason I'm not surprised you prefer Munch and Stokowski.

Those are both quite more than adequate as well.

In fact they all compliment each other very well.

I also might add the classic Haitink Concertgebouw recordings are also among my favorites. 

post #806 of 8942

The thing about Debussy's music is that it really needs finesse, transparency and color to make the biggest impact. Playing them "straight" drains a lot of the life out of it. The same goes for Ravel, especially Daphnis et Chloe.

post #807 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

The thing about Debussy's music is that it really needs finesse, transparency and color to make the biggest impact. Playing them "straight" drains a lot of the life out of it. The same goes for Ravel, especially Daphnis et Chloe.

 

Who exactly are you quoting with "straight"?

I'm guessing this is is implying something regarding Boulez' style.

 

I would say that "finesse, transparency and color" are important to most music yes?

at least sometimes anyway;

I admit the Haitink can be dark and blurred at times but...

 

And I know many people often like to mention Ravel and Debussy together when they make sweeping generalizations

(especially with in-specific cliches like "finesse, transparency and color") but they are really quite different.

 

Incidentally, which of those nice words are lacking from Boulez interpretations anyway?

I personally believe they are all easily applied here,

 

It's interesting you left out the word "passion and emotion" which are also used routinely by Boulez detractors.

post #808 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

 

Who exactly are you quoting with "straight"?

I'm guessing this is is implying something regarding Boulez' style.

 

I would say that "finesse, transparency and color" are important to most music yes?

at least sometimes anyway;

I admit the Haitink can be dark and blurred at times but...

 

And I know many people often like to mention Ravel and Debussy together when they make sweeping generalizations

(especially with in-specific cliches like "finesse, transparency and color") but they are really quite different.

 

Incidentally, which of those nice words are lacking from Boulez interpretations anyway?

I personally believe they are all easily applied here,

 

It's interesting you left out the word "passion and emotion" which are also used routinely by Boulez detractors.

 

And it's just turned Thanksgiving time here on the East coast Bigshot.

Enjoy yours eh?

post #809 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

 

Who exactly are you quoting with "straight"?

 

Not quoting anyone. My point was that some conductors (including Haitink) play Debussy and Ravel as pure music- notes on a page. Munch and Stokowski find atmospheres between the notes. Feelings. Moods. Some music, like Beethoven is great being played as abstract music. Some requires a different approach.

post #810 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

Not quoting anyone. My point was that some conductors (including Haitink) play Debussy and Ravel as pure music- notes on a page. Munch and Stokowski find atmospheres between the notes. Feelings. Moods. Some music, like Beethoven is great being played as abstract music. Some requires a different approach.

  

I don't believe in "pure".

Nice cliche though.

 

"Some requires a different approach".

All requires a different approach yes?

At least marginally IMO.

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