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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 46

post #676 of 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

 

I'm not sure "problem" is the word.The performances you posted are directly connected to the culture in which they were representing.

At this point it's al museum work.

 

It's more a matter of skill. If you want to sing on this level, you have to aim for it from a very young age. Today, that just isn't the goal for young people.

post #677 of 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

It's more a matter of skill. If you want to sing on this level, you have to aim for it from a very young age. Today, that just isn't the goal for young people.

 

As an educator and a not young person I would ask:Are young people not aiming for Skill?

I saw the Ensemble Modern perform last year and they were very young and scary skillful.

I also think they are as connected to the music as the Wagner performed in you're  links.

 

I think you're wrong IF you are using a blanket statement for all young people.

I hear this sort of sentiment frequently from "old people". and have my whole life......

post #678 of 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

 

As an educator and a not young person I would ask:Are young people not aiming for Skill?

I saw the Ensemble Modern perform last year and they were very young and scary skillful.

I also think they are as connected to the music as the Wagner performed in you're  links.

 

I think you're wrong IF you are using a blanket statement for all young people.

I hear this sort of sentiment frequently from "old people". and have my whole life......

 

And you're completely fooled if you think the wonderful performances you've posted are completely representative of 

ALL young OR old people of that era.

post #679 of 2183

No offense Bigshot but perhaps you're aesthetic is of another era??

 

I certainly don't mean lesser but indeed past....

post #680 of 2183

And (rant further) what doe 'Classical" really mean??

 

Neither of us are even discussing music of the "Classical" era.

Meaning what historians have placed between the Baroque and Romantic.

 

Ever read what Beethoven's critics said about his "skill" for example??

post #681 of 2183

New skills?

post #682 of 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

 

And you're completely fooled if you think the wonderful performances you've posted are completely representative of 

ALL young OR old people of that era.

 

I wasn't talking about specific people. I was talking about society. If society doesn't value something, skilled young people are attracted to other mediums and styles.

post #683 of 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

I wasn't talking about specific people. I was talking about society. If society doesn't value something, skilled young people are attracted to other mediums and styles.

Ok.

 

I think I understand you then.

I agree that young people in society today have different priorities for their skills.

post #684 of 2183

Like this:

 

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Not a rattle fanatic but here's some words from him...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pr8thgSQbRs

post #685 of 2183

post #686 of 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delirious Lab View Post
 

Thanks for your continuing to broaden the spectrum on this thread!

Never would have thought of this....

post #687 of 2183

These recordings, while flawed,

are representative of a time and place etc...

 

Etc...

post #688 of 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delirious Lab View Post


Great trumpet playing, not too great music, in my opinion.

Edit : Actually, the Jolivet is a good piece, but the Tomasi is very much meh.
Edited by amigomatt - 11/21/13 at 4:14am
post #689 of 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by amigomatt View Post


Great trumpet playing, not too great music, in my opinion.

Edit : Actually, the Jolivet is a good piece, but the Tomasi is very much meh.

i have always wondered what people thought about Wyntons classical trumpeting. I love his jazz but i cant listen to his classical recordings. 

post #690 of 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

i have always wondered what people thought about Wyntons classical trumpeting. I love his jazz but i cant listen to his classical recordings. 

I'm a semi-professional trumpet player myself.  My take on Wynton's playing is that, first and foremost, it's technically amazing.  I know people have debated this time over, myslef included and I've changed my mind a number of times about it.  Wynton gets stuck between a rock and a hard place, because the classical snobs tell him he doesn't have the right style to tackle that material, yet the jazzers say that he's too deliberate and technical on that front too.  He can't win, despite being one of the best musicians around.

 

I came to Wynton's playing from the classical/straight stuff initially.  His Carnaval album with the Eastman Wind Ensemble, where he plays all the great cornet solos is a masterpiece of playing, both in terms of technique and style.  Hearing that album helped inspire me to play the trumpet.  After that, I bought his Haydn and Hummel trumpet concertos, which are great too - so full of life and bravura.  They are played in an up to date way on modern instruments and sound just great.  Only a boring toff would tell you otherwise.  But then there's the Bach Brandenburg No.2 and various other Baroque era pieces that he plays brilliantly yet again, but with that exact same modern slant, with not much regard for authenticity.  Given that the sound of the instruments and interpretation in them days would have been wildy different, I can understand people not enjoying that.  I personally don't mind as I'm not a great fan of the baroque era anyway.

 

Another example, which might draw criticism from me is his interpretations of certain chamber works for piano and trumpet, such as the Hindemith Sonata.  Flawless and declamatory playing once again, but for such a piece as this, he really does miss the sombre darkness and seriousness of this work.  It becomes a trumpet spectacular again, which is just not right (and probably how most of the detractors of his baroque interpretations feel too.).

 

His jazz stuff is as broad as deep and pays homage to most of the bygone eras, with its own original slant.  I've seen him live with his septet in the 90s and I can vouch that his technique and endurance on the trumpet is verging on superhuman!  What a fine player, who's had the courage to tackle such a range of music with such dedication and virtuosity.  I can do nothing but applaud the man and what he stands for.  He certainly inspired me over the years to make a good racket out of a bent piece of metal stuck to my face!

 

Please enjoy a taste of his mindboggling technique, bravura and style with a great concept of sound and phrasing.  This is the whole album, which is amazing, but the link will take you to the Debutante at about 7.30:-

 


Edited by amigomatt - 11/21/13 at 10:18am
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