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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 42

post #616 of 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post
 

Who admits, to whom half forgiven !

Turns out I'd forgotten his Flying Dutchman which I picked up in some bargain bin last year.  Good stuff as well, especially since I'm a hopeless Theo Adam fanboy.

 

Does that get me the other half of your forgiveness?

post #617 of 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delirious Lab View Post

Now playing:




This is my only record by Otto K. Shame on me!

A good next Klemperer recording to get would be his Bruckner 6th symphony, again with the Philharmonia. That's my recommendation anyway!
post #618 of 2347

Thanks for the recommendation, I have yet to hear Bruckner's 6th so will keep an eye out for this...

post #619 of 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copperears View Post

I picked up all of Solti's Wagner on iTunes. It's a steal. Even the 1958 recording is phenomenal, and the performances remain benchmark.

I've had Levine and the Met on CD for many years, some great singing there.

Then there's Barenboim's live performance of Das Rheingold with the Bayreuth Festival, from the 1990s. Very energetic, but..... The feet! Worst at the beginning but don't get if you are distracted by stage noise (doesn't bother me).

Oh! Another unforgettable performance, of unforgettable music: Joseph Szigeti, Bach's Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin. Make sure you listen to this sometime in your lifetime. I've listened to later performances of the same repertoire, none as impassioned and musical, however.

And to add to that, while I'm in a J.S. Bach mood: Sigiswald Kuijken's performance of the Cello Suites on the "shoulder cello." Kuijken did research into Baroque instruments leading to his getting this instrument resurrected. The recording is phenomenal: the performances are expressive, the tonalities resonant and distinctively more lithe than those of later cellos, and the recording itself is a true audiophile's delight of clarity and presence.

You'll know instantly listening to these whether whatever transducer you are using is up to snuff across the board or not.

The Szigeti by contrast is a monoaural, older recording, but still phenomenal. Szigeti wasn't into "beautiful" tone but into the muscle and dance of Bach's music, and the full, noisy qualities of playing a violin with gusto. It's almost like listening to heavy metal Bach, it's that stunning. The squeaks, scratches, bounces of the bow on the string, are all part of the music. Makes me think of Pharaoh Sanders and Jimi Hendrix and John Coltrane. smily_headphones1.gif



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If you are a fan of Szigeti you may want to have a look here.

 

http://archive.org/search.php?page=1&query=%28creator%3A%22Joseph%20Szigeti%2C%20violin%22%29%20AND%20%28format%3Aflac%20OR%20format%3Ashorten%20OR%20format%3Amp3%20OR%20format%3Aogg%29

post #620 of 2347

Now playing, and recommending-- William Alwyn, Complete Symphonies, (the late) Richard Hickox, London Symphony Orchestra, Chandos:

 

post #621 of 2347

"In the late 1930's I realized that I could no longer look Mozart, Debussy or Puccini in the face. Their immense professionalism dazzled me. There and then I scrapped all my juvenilia and set to work to study again, this time not at an institution but with the scores of those composers I revered--Liszt, Wagner, Debussy, Puccini, Stravinsky, Scriabin and Elgar...Originality does not come by rejection of one's heritage but through acceptance; individuality (or style) is founded on the past. And I believe with Turgenev that 'it is possible to be original without being eccentric.'"--William Alwyn

post #622 of 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcamera View Post

Now playing, and recommending-- William Alwyn, Complete Symphonies, (the late) Richard Hickox, London Symphony Orchestra, Chandos:



Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcamera View Post

"In the late 1930's I realized that I could no longer look Mozart, Debussy or Puccini in the face. Their immense professionalism dazzled me. There and then I scrapped all my juvenilia and set to work to study again, this time not at an institution but with the scores of those composers I revered--Liszt, Wagner, Debussy, Puccini, Stravinsky, Scriabin and Elgar...Originality does not come by rejection of one's heritage but through acceptance; individuality (or style) is founded on the past. And I believe with Turgenev that 'it is possible to be original without being eccentric.'"--William Alwyn

This is all good and what this thread is about. I've dabbled with Alwyn and I think these are definitive.
post #623 of 2347

 

Tannhauser Act 1: "Dir Tone Lob!" (Hymn to Venus)
Lauritz Melchior 1934
http://www.vintageip.com/xfers/tannhauserhymntovenus.mp3

 

They don't make heldentenors like this any more!

post #624 of 2347

I listened to this last night.  Great Italian arias on Side 1, but the 20th century Side 2 steals the show.  Still haunted by it this morning.

 

post #625 of 2347

Talking about nice recordings....

 

Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker - Complete Ballet

Moscow RTV Symphony Orchestra & Vladimir Fedoseyev

 

 

 

 

post #626 of 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by sh4dowd4ncer View Post
 

Talking about nice recordings....

 

Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker - Complete Ballet

Moscow RTV Symphony Orchestra & Vladimir Fedoseyev

 

 

 

 

+1

post #627 of 2347

I know that some fellow members will not agree but in my humble opinion one of the best performances of three "classics" Beethoven`s piano sonatas

post #628 of 2347
Absolutely agree. Claudio Arrau like Rubinstein plays out of a lived connection with performance traditions passed down "orally" and experientially from the composers of the music he plays. It's not "scholarly" authenticity per se, but lived authenticity, which I find more inspiring.
post #629 of 2347

But here there is something that always amuse me...

Performance x Recording...

 

I do really enjoy Arrau`s performance but it is impressive how the white noise (statics) from the CD bothers me.

I am not sure if it my equipment or if I am an amateur in the classical music world, but hours of old recording causes me fatigue.

And it is really a pity because if you hear Arrau, Gulda (as a fellow member here introduced me), and so on, it is quite impressive.

 

And today with a lot of technology, turns out that it is easier to here Barenboim or the young man below.

Impressive records but quite average performances...

post #630 of 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by sh4dowd4ncer View Post
 

But here there is something that always amuse me...

Performance x Recording...

 

I do really enjoy Arrau`s performance but it is impressive how the white noise (statics) from the CD bothers me.

I am not sure if it my equipment or if I am an amateur in the classical music world, but hours of old recording causes me fatigue.

And it is really a pity because if you hear Arrau, Gulda (as a fellow member here introduced me), and so on, it is quite impressive.

 

And today with a lot of technology, turns out that it is easier to here Barenboim or the young man below.

Impressive records but quite average performances...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sh4dowd4ncer View Post
 

But here there is something that always amuse me...

Performance x Recording...

 

I do really enjoy Arrau`s performance but it is impressive how the white noise (statics) from the CD bothers me.

I am not sure if it my equipment or if I am an amateur in the classical music world, but hours of old recording causes me fatigue.

And it is really a pity because if you hear Arrau, Gulda (as a fellow member here introduced me), and so on, it is quite impressive.

 

And today with a lot of technology, turns out that it is easier to here Barenboim or the young man below.

Impressive records but quite average performances...

Back in my retail days, a young couple, both members of our symphonic orchestra, the Slovenian Philharmonic Orchestra http://www.filharmonija.si/eng , entered in the shop I worked in back then. They wanted to hear a couple of recordings of a piece they were about to perform in a couple of days. Of course I demoed all CDs of that piece I had on stock. They bought the one they liked best and on their way OUT of my classical music sanctuary, separated from the pop boom & sizzle by one floor, they made a VERY impish remark about the small vynil LP record bin I had quite a struggle with my superiours to put up there in the first place. 

 

WAAIIT - do you have 15 minutes time? - was my immediate reaction. They did.

 

Then I demoed them the same recording ( one of from the Decca Legends series of 96/24 remasterd CDs, exact title escapes memory after 9 or so years ) on CD and its

then current re-release on vynil. You should have seen their jaws dropped to the floor - not only did the record sound far better and natural, it was completely devoid of the white noise you are talking about being present in the CD version of vintage analog recordings. I had Project RPM4 turntable with Project K4 cartridge ( rebadged Grado Black ) and Project PhonoBox SE in addition to the CD based rig for demonstration. So, far closer to an entry level than high end analog setup. But I did set up that RPM4 to the best of my abilities, using professional test records long no longer available, using an oscilloscope - and final tuning by ear.

 

In terms of income per shop floor surface, that 40 x 70 or so cm record bin proved #1 after only 2-3 months after its appearence.

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