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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 27

post #391 of 2747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Origin89 View Post

Speaking of, any other Dvorak fans? I don't think I realized how good he was. Any favorite recordings?

 

Talich (the best, but mono), Vaclav Neumann, Kertesz

post #392 of 2747
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

Talich (the best, but mono), Vaclav Neumann, Kertesz

 

 

No Kubelik? I was in between him, Neumann, and Kertsesz and wound up going with Kubelik's recording. Something about it was so lush and majestic. 

post #393 of 2747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Origin89 View Post
 

 

 

No Kubelik? I was in between him, Neumann, and Kertsesz and wound up going with Kubelik's recording. Something about it was so lush and majestic. 

 

Kubelik is also excellent but not quite as good as Kertesz, for me.  I find Kubelik terrific in Mahler, Beethoven, and his Bruckner Sym Nr. 9 on Orfeo is incredible.

post #394 of 2747

good,I am going to give Symphony #3 my un-divided attention next. Then maybe I will dive into the giant Living Stereo collection this weekend. 

hDDnd7

post #395 of 2747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgard Varese View Post
 

 

Kubelik is also excellent but not quite as good as Kertesz, for me.  I find Kubelik terrific in Mahler, Beethoven, and his Bruckner Sym Nr. 9 on Orfeo is incredible.

 

 

They definitely have their own style: 

 

Kubelik's readings seem more experienced and mysterious

 

Kertesz's readings seem more young and lively

 

 

I'll probably end up buying Kertesz's and Neumann's as well. I'm enjoying Dvorak that much.

post #396 of 2747

Kubelik is great, but Dvorak is a crowded field. He does a first class Ma Vlast, even though Talich is better.

post #397 of 2747

I'll have to check out Talich, but hearing that it's in mono is really a draw-back....

post #398 of 2747

There's a lot of great music and music making that just doesn't exist in modern recordings. As you go along, you learn to listen past the sound to focus on the music.

post #399 of 2747

Absolutely, but the immature recording processes definitely hinder the beauty of the music. Sort of puts a foggy veil over it. 

 

 

Have you any preferred Sibelius recordings? Davis, Blomstedt, Berglund, Maazel, Barbirolli?


Edited by Origin89 - 10/29/13 at 10:45am
post #400 of 2747

. oopps srry

post #401 of 2747
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

There's a lot of great music and music making that just doesn't exist in modern recordings. As you go along, you learn to listen past the sound to focus on the music.

Indeed, besides the sunbeams of unspeakable individuality which reach straight for the heart, historal context is a inevitable part of the experience..

 

People in general are all so tight up in trivial contemporary crap anyways :D

post #402 of 2747

.... or Vanska's Sibelius? I might go with that one.

post #403 of 2747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Origin89 View Post
 

Absolutely, but the immature recording processes definitely hinder the beauty of the music. Sort of puts a foggy veil over it. 

 

 

Have you any preferred Sibelius recordings? Davis, Blomstedt, Berglund, Maazel, Barbirolli?

 

The veil is in your head, not the recording. You learn to listen past that if you make an effort. I can't imagine doing without great recordings of the past... Especially in opera and instrumental solo music where there is no modern equivalent to a lot of older recordings.

 

It took me a LONG time to find Sibelius that didn't bore me. The one that changed everything for me was Kajanus. But again, these are recordings from the 30s. These are my own transfers from original shellac disks...

 

Pohjola's Daughter Op 49

http://www.vintageip.com/xfers/soundingsilence02.mp3

 

Tapiola Op 112

http://www.vintageip.com/xfers/soundingsilence03.mp3

 

Symphony No 5 in E flat Major Op 82

http://www.vintageip.com/xfers/soundingsilence04.mp3

 

These legendary recordings were made in June of 1932 by Sibelius' friend, Robert Kajanus. Kajanus was instrumental to the tremendous growth of Finnish music through the turn of the century, founding the Helsinki Philharmonic and leading it for over fifty years. He composed several notable orchestral works, including the tone poem Aino, based on a folk tale from the Kalevala. But when he came in contact with the music of Sibelius, he set aside composing for a career as a conductor. He worked closely with Sibelius on his interpretations, and his recordings of the First, Second, Third and Fifth symphonies have come to be regarded as definitive.

Kajanus told an amusing story about his friendship with Sibelius... He was dining in a small restaurant outside of Helsinki with Sibelius and a group of friends, when he revealed that he would have to leave soon to conduct a performance of the Helsinki Philharmonic. Sibelius protested his departure, arguing that an assistant could easily conduct in his absence. Kajanus reluctantly excused himself to make a phone call to let the theater manager know he wouldn't be able to make it to the performance. But when he got to the phone, he felt guilty for neglecting his responsibility. He picked up his hat and coat and took the train to Helsinki without saying goodbye to the group. He conducted the program, returned on the night train and arrived back again at the restaurant to find Sibelius and company still ensconced just as he had left them. As he sat back down at the table, Sibelius looked over at him and said, "My! That was a long phone call!"
post #404 of 2747
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

The veil is in your head, not the recording. You learn to listen past that if you make an effort. I can't imagine doing without great recordings of the past... Especially in opera and instrumental solo music where there is no modern equivalent to a lot of older recordings.

 

It took me a LONG time to find Sibelius that didn't bore me. The one that changed everything for me was Kajanus. But again, these are recordings from the 30s. These are my own transfers from original shellac disks...

 

Pohjola's Daughter Op 49

http://www.vintageip.com/xfers/soundingsilence02.mp3

 

Tapiola Op 112

http://www.vintageip.com/xfers/soundingsilence03.mp3

 

Symphony No 5 in E flat Major Op 82

http://www.vintageip.com/xfers/soundingsilence04.mp3

 

 

 

Once again, your experience is helping me push deeper at warp speeds. I suppose it's just an idea I have that's creating the block, but there's something very charming about those recordings. I'll have to listen to them more thoroughly. Thanks a bunch.

post #405 of 2747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Origin89 View Post
 

I'll have to check out Talich, but hearing that it's in mono is really a draw-back....

 

Try not to let mono sound hold you back.  There are a lot of great DG recordings from the 1950s in mono that sound incredible (examples include those recordings collected on the 10-cd set MUSIK ... SPRACHE DER WELT, which you can listen to for free on DG's site)...

 

Vol I: http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/en/cat/4749802

 

Vol II: http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/en/cat/4775494 (some of this is in stereo)


Edited by Edgard Varese - 10/29/13 at 1:06pm
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