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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 221

post #3301 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by RRod View Post
 

 

I never said Bach was boring, I just don't rate him greater than Beethoven. What separates Bach from his contemporaries is a finer ability at counterpoint and, more importantly to *me*, a better natural melodic gift. "The" gift, as someone like Tchaikovsky would say. If you are just absolutely in love with contrapuntal writing, then you'll probably like Bach better than Beethoven and Mozart. But if you don't, then you probably put him on less of a pedestal, and then others get a chance to jump over him. There's tons of Bach I like; there's tons of Beethoven I like. But at the end of the day after debating "greatness," I go put on a playlist of Mozart slow movements :D

Fair enough my friend, fair enough... :)

 

 

But as long as you understand- my taste in music is better than yours! :p 

 

 

And just for laughs, here's my top ten composers in respect to greatness. All in my (very important and informed) opinion. :D (because I'm bored at work and everyone is p*ssing about dressed up for easter. WTF has batman got to do with the rebirth of Jesus???) 

 

Anyways here goes...

 

 1 - Telemann (JOKING) It's Bach of course!! Who else??? No one even comes close in terms of technical ability and writing good tunes! (see my blog above)

 

 2 - Beethoven.  Probably the most loved mind and soul of any composer. His music has sent more shivers up my spine and filled my eyes with tears more than any other.

 

 3- Mozart. - If you don't like Mozart then you don't like music. Simple as. His gift for character building and story telling is astonishing. His Operas are masterpieces of western culture.

 

 4- Schubert - If all Schubert had wrote was songs then he would still be number 4. His talent for songwriting and touching deep into the dark side of humanity was groundbreaking. And still unsurpassed. 

 

 5.- Brahms - There aren't many composers where everything they wrote is perfect. But Brahms is a close contender for this... Carrying on from Beethoven he took the Germanic classical form further still. All in a very tasteful and intellectual way. Some people get Brahms - some don't. But that's not Brahms fault. 

 

6. Prokofiev - Probably the most talented composer since Mozart and still to be fully appreciated imo. He created masterpieces in every genre of classical music from sonatas to concertos to symphonies and opera.  No other composer has done this as great since Mozart.

 

7. Tchaikovsky - Imagine a world without Tchaikovsky.... Lets not! Underneath the obvious gift for melody that we all whistle, lies a complex personality. The greatest Ballet composer, but it is his Symphonies and chamber works that speak to me in a musical language that is far from magical and childlike. Still a very misunderstood composer. 

 

8. Haydn - Often over shadowed by the popularity of Mozart these days, but we wouldn't have a Mozart or Beethoven as we know them without Haydn. His mammoth output contains some of the greatest classical music ever written. It's a shame that a lot of us can't find the time to look past his more celebrated works. 

 

9. Wagner - Misunderstood or not, no one can dispute his genius. Who else could write a 14 hour long opera that contains so much intellectual substance along with some of the most inventive orchestral music ever penned. Music that weaves a multi- layered story telling that has perplexed both music lovers and intellectuals alike for nearly two centuries. 

 

10. Chopin - The greatest piano writer of the romantic period. Stretched the instrument to its limits without creating art for art's sake. His works are often melancholic but uplifting. A troubled man that created some of the worlds most beautiful music.  

 

 

 

(All in good fun and if your fave is not on the list, please don't be offended as it is only my opinion.)

post #3302 of 8935

+1 on Haydn!!!!!!!

post #3303 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post
 

Fair enough my friend, fair enough... :)

 

 

But as long as you understand- my taste in music is better than yours! :p 

 

 

And just for laughs, here's my top ten composers in respect to greatness. All in my (very important and informed) opinion. :D (because I'm bored at work and everyone is p*ssing about dressed up for easter. WTF has batman got to do with the rebirth of Jesus???) 

....

 

(All in good fun and if your fave is not on the list, please don't be offended as it is only my opinion.)

 

LOL, yeah that can happen and on various occasion "group feeling" events, everybody seems to go nuts but yourself ;).

 

Anyway, I think I have mentioned it a while back but this discussion brings this fresh up to my mind:

I never had a music/music theory class. At the time our school did not have a teacher for music, so we all had art class ... Sometime I feel I am missing something in that I am not able to recognize certain formal aspects in composition but at the bottom line I guess I am better off this way, as I can just simply enjoy the music without any theoretical ballast that gets in the way. I am not analyzing and dissecting the work. Its like enjoying a good meal without dissecting all single ingredients and the method of cooking how the chef has put it together.

 

Last night I listened to this :

 

Heifetz / Sibelius / Prokofiev / Glazunov: Concertos

 

And it was delicious :biggrin:

post #3304 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post
 

Fair enough my friend, fair enough... :)

 

 

But as long as you understand- my taste in music is better than yours! :p 

 

 

And just for laughs, here's my top ten composers in respect to greatness. All in my (very important and informed) opinion. :D (because I'm bored at work and everyone is p*ssing about dressed up for easter. WTF has batman got to do with the rebirth of Jesus???) 

 

(All in good fun and if your fave is not on the list, please don't be offended as it is only my opinion.)

 

Given your top 10 list, our tastes seem pretty close except for a matter of ordering. I prefer Shostakovich to Prokofiev, and I'm sad to see Raisin Brahms on there :D

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by icebear View Post
 

Last night I listened to this :

 

 

 

And it was delicious :biggrin:

 

Oh man let's not debate Heifetz' Sibelius again >_<

post #3305 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post
 

 

 

 3- Mozart. - If you don't like Mozart then you don't like music. Simple as. His gift for character building and story telling is astonishing. His Operas are masterpieces of western culture.

 

 

 

 

I'm sad to say that I've never really liked Mozart's music. Most of the time I find it banal, or even juvenile.

post #3306 of 8935
My challenge on LugBug1's list is Chopin. Perhaps I am not on the higher plain of understanding yet, but I would rather go to the dentist.
post #3307 of 8935

Just gonna add this recommendation before the impending Mozart discussion :D

Shame he didn't manage to compose more Sonatas. They sound like daydream. This and Tchaikovsky's beautiful string quartets have been getting a lot of listening time - credit to Shostakovich for setting me on this route of discovery.

-----

One piece of music that I humbly consider a music lover's piece (whatever that may mean...) is the Pastoral symphony. It the first piece I fell in love with as a child. That opening oboe section made the music instantly familiar. There is just such a great amount of joy in those movements, expressed with such effortlessness, which considering LvB's declining audial health, I presume was anything but. It makes it just stand out from among his other symphonies.

-----

Briefly on Mozart, as I am not an expert on his complete repertoire - I always find there is exquisite beauty to be found in his melodies. E.g. 'Le Nozze di Figaro' (Currentzis/ Musica Eterna) or his violin concertos, string quartets, piano stuff in all is work really.. Sometimes music like this can become almost part of the fabric of the musical landscape, and there is always the danger of it being overplayed, and becoming a cliché. Some of his melodies make his music very easy to like, with the downside of it seeming shallow - which it isn't. Thankfully I've not tired of it yet, and the turns of his melodic phrasings I still find achingly beautiful and spontaneous.

 

At least that is what I most identify with Mozart. I need to find more time for his operas.


Edited by SunTanScanMan - 4/2/15 at 10:14am
post #3308 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunTanScanMan View Post
 

Just gonna add this recommendation before the impending Mozart discussion :D
 

-----

One piece of music that I humbly consider a music lover's piece (whatever that may mean...) is the Pastoral symphony. It the first piece I fell in love with as a child. That opening oboe section made the music instantly familiar. There is just such a great amount of joy in those movements, expressed with such effortlessness, which considering LvB's declining audial health, I presume was anything but. It makes it just stand out from among his other symphonies.

-----

Briefly on Mozart, as I am not an expert on his complete repertoire - I always find there is exquisite beauty to be found in his melodies. E.g. 'Le Nozze di Figaro' (Currentzis/ Musica Eterna) or his violin concertos, string quartets, piano stuff in all is work really.. Sometimes music like this can become almost part of the fabric of the musical landscape, and there is always the danger of it being overplayed, and becoming a cliché. Some of his melodies make his music very easy to like, with the downside of it seeming shallow - which it isn't. Thankfully I've not tired of it yet, and the turns of his melodic phrasings I still find achingly beautiful and spontaneous.

 

At least that is what I most identify with Mozart. I need to find more time for his operas.

 

Pastoral is way under-rated. The soaring string part towards the end of the 1st movement with the repeating intervals in the winds is one of my favorite moments in music.

 

As far as Mozart, I find people just don't classify his music correctly and form bad assumptions based on that. Eine Kleine is the best and obvious example: it was a *serenade*, a piece of diversion music, written in a jiff whilst he was working on Don Giovanni of all things. Funny that an afterthought of his mind gives us THE most recognizable tune in all of classical music. So people hear it and go "man is this all he's got?"; well in fact, no. You can look at most forms and ensembles and find masterpieces by Mozart near the top, e.g.

Symphonies: Pretty much everything from 36+

Concertos: Too many to list

Chamber Music: Haydn quartets, the Quintets, the String "Divertimento", etc.

Solo piano: Say what you want about the sonatas, they're great. His fantasias are out there too

Opera: no comment needed

Mass: never got to finish either Requiem or Mass in C, but the power in both is palpable and imposing

 

And that's just masterworks, let alone the stuff that isn't quite "TEH best" but is super good, like his string duos, lieder, wind serenades, etc. If someone can think all of that is infantile, then ok. I would disagree.

post #3309 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by RRod View Post
 

 

Pastoral is way under-rated. The soaring string part towards the end of the 1st movement with the repeating intervals in the winds is one of my favorite moments in music.

 

As far as Mozart, I find people just don't classify his music correctly and form bad assumptions based on that. Eine Kleine is the best and obvious example: it was a *serenade*, a piece of diversion music, written in a jiff whilst he was working on Don Giovanni of all things. Funny that an afterthought of his mind gives us THE most recognizable tune in all of classical music. So people hear it and go "man is this all he's got?"; well in fact, no. You can look at most forms and ensembles and find masterpieces by Mozart near the top, e.g.

Symphonies: Pretty much everything from 36+

Concertos: Too many to list

Chamber Music: Haydn quartets, the Quintets, the String "Divertimento", etc.

Solo piano: Say what you want about the sonatas, they're great. His fantasias are out there too

Opera: no comment needed

Mass: never got to finish either Requiem or Mass in C, but the power in both is palpable and imposing

 

And that's just masterworks, let alone the stuff that isn't quite "TEH best" but is super good, like his string duos, lieder, wind serenades, etc. If someone can think all of that is infantile, then ok. I would disagree.


I mean I love the whole of the 6th, but the final movement wow... ripples, echoes and overlaps all with a slight swing, and when done right, the end comes in a final sigh of contentment. For me it stands head and shoulders above his other symphonies, I look forward to every movement when I listen to it.
 


Edited by SunTanScanMan - 4/2/15 at 6:08pm
post #3310 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post
 

 1 - Bach

 2 - Beethoven

 3- Mozart

 4- Schubert

 5.- Brahms

6. Prokofiev

7. Tchaikovsky

8. Haydn

9. Wagner

10. Chopin

 

I'm with you on most of that, just in a different order

 

1) Bach

2) Mozart

3) Wagner

4) Beethoven

5) Haydn

6) Tchaikovsky

7) Schubert

8) Chopin

9) Verdi

10) Ravel / Debussy (I get to combine them!)

 

Honorable mention: Mendelssohn and Ives

 

Beethoven's 7th is a fantastic symphony, but it doesn't have a name so people don't consider it the same as Pastoral, Eroica or Choral.


Edited by bigshot - 4/2/15 at 4:37pm
post #3311 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildcatsare1 View Post

My challenge on LugBug1's list is Chopin. Perhaps I am not on the higher plain of understanding yet, but I would rather go to the dentist.


The thing about Chopin is that the performer is half of the music. Chopin's music has to be played as full blooded Polish heart-on-your-sleeve music, not as dainty, tinkly white lacey handkerchiefs tucked in each sleeve. It's similar with Tchaikovsky. Every time a conductor approaches Tchaikovsky with a formal classical manner to present the score to the letter without adding anything of himself, all that Russian color fades to pale blandness.

post #3312 of 8935

I can never make these lists. Where to put Mahler? Strauss? Bartok? My boy Dvořák? I end up wanting ties, which kind of defeats the purpose of the list ^_^

post #3313 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

I'm with you on most of that, just in a different order

 

Beethoven's 7th is a fantastic symphony, but it doesn't have a name so people don't consider it the same as Pastoral, Eroica or Choral.

 

I tend to see the Pastoral dogged on more than the 7th, tbh. I have to say the only LvB symphony I never really "get" is the 4th.

post #3314 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by RRod View Post
 

 

I tend to see the Pastoral dogged on more than the 7th, tbh. I have to say the only LvB symphony I never really "get" is the 4th.

I never really thought of it before but you are right. I think in all my life I have listened to the 4th two or three times, compared to close to a hundred of all the rest. Comes off as dull and lifeless to me, like it was something he had to do to fill a contract but had no real interest in it.

post #3315 of 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post
 

Fair enough my friend, fair enough... :)

 

 

But as long as you understand- my taste in music is better than yours! :p 

 

 

And just for laughs, here's my top ten composers in respect to greatness. All in my (very important and informed) opinion. :D (because I'm bored at work and everyone is p*ssing about dressed up for easter. WTF has batman got to do with the rebirth of Jesus???) 

 

Anyways here goes...

 

1 - Bach

2 - Beethoven

3- Mozart

4- Schubert

5.- Brahms

6. Prokofiev

7. Tchaikovsky

8. Haydn 

9. Wagner

10. Chopin 

 

 

(All in good fun and if your fave is not on the list, please don't be offended as it is only my opinion.)

Very similar to what my list would be except for the order Move Bach down to around 5 just behind Brahms and substitute Mahler for Wagner. I just love Beethoven, what can I say.Always #1 on any list of mine.

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