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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 148

post #2206 of 2667

Maybe try Celibidache's Bruckner?

 

It's the only Bruckner I personally can appreciate, when I'm in that mood..

post #2207 of 2667
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 

For me, old school means  non aggressive, more classical than romantic, sparse use of vibrato, don't know why 

-edit-  maybe 'conservative' is a better word for what I ment, sorry, English isn't my first language :o 

 

That describes modern performance practice more than 20th century performance practice. I guess the old school wasn't old school.

post #2208 of 2667

Michael Tippett's penultimate work "The Rose Lake" inspired by a trip to Lake Retba (northwest Africa).

 

A fantastic piece to chill with. Not going to try to describe it other than it is both beautiful and interesting :)

 

Chandos has the best recording below under Richard Hickox

 

 

And Lake Retba

post #2209 of 2667

Rihm's Symphony 'Nahe Fern' recently released on Harmonia Mundi.

 

This is a wonderful example of modern yet very accessible orchestral music. Those who are familiar with Rihm know his music can be starkly modern and jagged one moment and then very romantic the next. This, his latest orchestral work is much more romantic in tone and structure. Romantic because it is a homage, or more accurately a 'response' to the Brahms 4 symphonies. Four parts responding to the 4 symphonies respectively with an added part (2nd movement) song based on a Goethe poem from where the title comes from. Lovely spacious sound. 

 

post #2210 of 2667

It's verrr quiet in here...? Is everyone on holiday or something? :D 

 

 

Here's a recommendation of a recent pianist (though she is 41) that is still to receive deserved acclaim, even though reviews of her Chopin have been incredibly positive. Argentinian born Ingrid Fliter.

I love Chopin - truly, madly, deeply and I can sniff out the crap from the good stuff.  And this is very good stuff from Ingrid. The right balance of articulation, playfulness- sensuality and technicality. I wouldn't chuck her out of bed either If you know what I mean... :D

 

Both these disks come with the highest stamp of approval.

 

 

post #2211 of 2667
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post
 

It's verrr quiet in here...? Is everyone on holiday or something? :D

 

Indeed Labor Day weekend in US, official "end of summer" with "end of season sale" and "back to school sale" and "waste more money sale", so everyone is busy using their credit cards :D.

I will check out Ingrid Fliter's recordings, never heard of her before...

post #2212 of 2667

I've just been catching up with the recent recommendations :) so part of me has been a little glad this thread has slowed down.

 

@LugBug1 - I've been studying to 'The Rose Lake' - relaxing and not too intrusive it's pretty perfect for that.

 

 

Currently started listening to:

 

I haven't heard much Paganini at all. Not sure if I'm entirely convinced with the flair of certain parts (I suspect this is perfect Heifetz material). But there are a lot of enjoyable moments nevertheless. Going in with a somewhat forced open mind.

post #2213 of 2667

Paganini isn't something for a player without flair. That would totally miss the point. Accardo does a very good job.

 

Heifetz wouldn't have any problem with this, but he is much better on music with a lot of powerful emotions so he can phrase it like a singer. Paganini is all about pyrotechnics.


Edited by bigshot - 8/30/14 at 6:26pm
post #2214 of 2667

I should have been clearer, I was talking about Paganini, rather than Accardo. I expected flair, but still, I tend to take some time to adjusting to new music that's all :)

 

I like your description of Heifetz.

 

post #2215 of 2667
Quote:
Originally Posted by icebear View Post
 

Indeed Labor Day weekend in US, official "end of summer" with "end of season sale" and "back to school sale" and "waste more money sale", so everyone is busy using their credit cards :D.

I will check out Ingrid Fliter's recordings, never heard of her before...

Aahh I see :)  Yup defo an expensive time when going back to school... Luckily my kids are aged 22 and 2 so no school involved at the mo. Plus my wallet is always empty from them anyway...  

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SunTanScanMan View Post
 

I've just been catching up with the recent recommendations :) so part of me has been a little glad this thread has slowed down.

 

@LugBug1 - I've been studying to 'The Rose Lake' - relaxing and not too intrusive it's pretty perfect for that.

 

 

Currently started listening to:

 

I haven't heard much Paganini at all. Not sure if I'm entirely convinced with the flair of certain parts (I suspect this is perfect Heifetz material). But there are a lot of enjoyable moments nevertheless. Going in with a somewhat forced open mind.

Pleased you're enjoying the Rose Lake. Yeah as Bigshot pointed out; Paganini is all about pyrotechnics and nothing but a 'show off' if you ask me :D Hugely gifted musician technically and incredibly innovative, but his music is always going to appeal more to aspiring musicians than to listeners IMO.  

 

If you fancy a bit more substance in your solo violin works then Bach is your man. Bare in mind that these were written a hundred years before Paganini was showcasing his talents and the style of music is in the Baroque mode. But if you ask any good musician 'who is the hardest to play and get right.. The answer will be Bach. 

 

Try this :) 

 

EMI

post #2216 of 2667

And while we're on the subject of Bach.. The Brandenburg Concertos are some of the greatest music ever written. (Yes I do like my rhetoric statements :) And so with this in mind you will need a good recording. If you happen to stumble across these great works via the hands of a conductor with a new ideology or is perhaps more suited to conducting Bruckner then you may very well be put off listening to them again and ultimately lose out on a world of beautifully rich music that can have you bouncing along one moment and then gently weeping into your man sized tissue the next. 

 

Luckily for the readers of this thread I have taken the time to recommend a very good example of a good interpretation. I like this recording (from 1991) because it is vibrant, rough edged, dynamic and warm. I can't stand overly bright recordings that focus all the attention on the sound of the individual period instruments. This is a period instrument recording but there is also a nice dynamic involved. Some might argue that the Cello/Gamba are accentuated a little too much but I find the extra weight at the bottom is what a lot of modern (period instrument) recordings lack these days. Other than that, all instruments have equal space and with the 'live' feeling involved and the occasional lack of uber refinement - this all adds to a great authentic and very musical set. 

 

Anyhow try this for size you young Bachanians. Conductor and Viola - Jordi Savall.  

 

post #2217 of 2667

Hi guys,

 

New to this thread and new to Classical music.  

 

I don't care to much for the slow love song type of classical.  I like the upbeat style that puts a strain on the amp.  So far I like the 2Cellos.  Any other recommendations?  I would love to hear this type in a big Symphony Orchestra setting - or Cello Concertos..

 

 

 

 

 

:beerchug: 


Edited by preproman - 8/31/14 at 8:58am
post #2218 of 2667
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post
 

... (Yes I do like my rhetoric statements :)...

 

Luckily for the readers of this thread I have taken the time to recommend a very good example of a good interpretation. ...

 

Anyhow try this for size you young Bachanians. Conductor and Viola - Jordi Savall.  

 

 

 :beerchug: well thanks a lot. Much appreciated, the recommendations as well as the reading ;).

I have these on my list and additionally also the Orchestral works of Bach on the same label with Jordi Savall.

Bach: Orchestral Suites Nos. 1-4

 

 

Coming back to Paganini :

Here an album of works "A Paganini" (i.e. style of but from different composers) which I bought after I attended a concert of Gidon Kremer in small town hall somewhere in the woods of nowhere. Obviously there was not a huge tradition of classical concerts there and for sure not virtuose solo violin pieces but what happened was absolutely stunning. The hall of maybe 400 become perfectly quiet and you could hear a needle drop and Kremer started to play Milstein's "Paganiniana". I guess everyone as holding their breath and afterwards burst in standing ovations. And yes, some also made use of the man sized tissues ;).

 

51NZ5sQ11eL._SL500_AA280_.jpg

post #2219 of 2667
Quote:
Originally Posted by preproman View Post
 

Hi guys,

 

New to this thread and new to Classical music.  

 

I don't care to much for the slow love song type of classical.  I like the upbeat style that puts a strain on the amp.  So far I like the 2Cellos.  Any other recommendations?  I would love to here this type in a big Symphony Orchestra setting - or Cello Concertos..

:beerchug:

for Cello ... anything by Jaqueline DuPre. But listen online and check if that's no too classical for you. I guess you might prefer more "rock style classic".

post #2220 of 2667

I'd recently been listening to Perlman (mostly his Mozart). Also the Brandenburg Concertos along with harpsichord fugues were my introduction to Bach. Lovely stuff indeed!

 

- Now I've listened to the four seasons as much as the next man, but I came across this gem and it's been a staple in my recent playlist

 

They playing of the music is perfectly judged, the slightly slower tempo, and how the musicians' playing complement each other as a group rather than presenting a 'front man' so to speak. A live performance as well.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by icebear View Post
 

Coming back to Paganini :

Here an album of works "A Paganini" (i.e. style of but from different composers) which I bought after I attended a concert of Gidon Kremer in small town hall somewhere in the woods of nowhere. Obviously there was not a huge tradition of classical concerts there and for sure not virtuose solo violin pieces but what happened was absolutely stunning. The hall of maybe 400 become perfectly quiet and you could hear a needle drop and Kremer started to play Milstein's "Paganiniana". I guess everyone as holding their breath and afterwards burst in standing ovations. And yes, some also made use of the man sized tissues ;).

 

51NZ5sQ11eL._SL500_AA280_.jpg

 

That's a great story. Reading it reminds me that I need to attend more performances. Living in London, I have no excuses...

 

 

 

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