Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Best classical recordings...ever!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 125

post #1861 of 2199
The Karajan records I occasionally listen to feature him as an accompanist:

Gould playing Beethoven's 3d
Lipatti playing Mozart 21st
Gieseking playing the Emperor
Brain playing Mozart's horn concerti
post #1862 of 2199

Don't contribute much to the thread much much these days BUT...

 

MOST of the music posted here is Germanic in origin one way or another.

Even Tchaikovsky (:veryevil:) formally at least.

 

Why do y'all(for the most part) have to dwell in Germanic music(in a quite limited spectrum) or romantic greatest hits?

Not to say Germanic music isn't the best:rolleyes:  "classical" music "ever" but...

Even the Bach stuff listed here is quite limited in scope of repertoire...

Also many recordings get mentioned SEVERAL times as if....

 

And yes, I'm asking you to reach a bit.

Or please let me know why (in your opinion) this is the case.

 

It's ok if you love this music (as I do in fact).

This post isn't a criticism but an open question.

 

I know I'm a pain in the ass but....

post #1863 of 2199

Well, I'm a great fan of Glenn Gould's Bach, so ehm.. wasn't he a Canadian?.:D

post #1864 of 2199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 

Well, I'm a great fan of Glenn Gould's Bach, so ehm.. wasn't he a Canadian?.:D

Quite :tongue:

post #1865 of 2199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 

Well, I'm a great fan of Glenn Gould's Bach, so ehm.. wasn't he a Canadian?.:D

 

Good point actually.

Gould stretched the boundaries of accepted performance practice of his time.

post #1866 of 2199

Most people on this site got here I assume because of interest in playback systems, headphones specifically. It's not a music specialist or fanatic site - there are plenty of those on the web. Most people here have limited exposure to classical (God, I hate that term) and for those people the Austro/German music world is the natural starting point. Like it or not, they owned serious music for much of the time from 1750-1900. Only in the late 19th c and the 20th did other countries flex their musical muscles - that was the Nationalistic movement. While inexperienced listeners may focus on the German speaking countries, if the interest is pursued eventually Russia, England, France, Spain, USA, Scandinavia, even China and Japan reveal their very significant contributions. But when it comes down to it, even the great composer of those countries held their Austro/German progenitors in highest esteem. The listeners just need time. So much music, so little time.

post #1867 of 2199

mbhaub makes an excellent point. 

Another obvious one is that most headfi members hail from the US. There is an excellent book by Joseph Horowitz about the trajectory of classical music in the US,

 that discusses how Beethoven, Wagner, and Mahler came to dominate US classical music scene. 

I am guessing that if we had more members from Europe we would read more about Haendel or Vivaldi, about Bach vocal masterpieces, Italian opera, etc, etc

post #1868 of 2199
First classical music I bought when quite young was bargain discs of Bach, Beethoven and Mozart - the "greats". Years later I confess I still don't care for Bach, my interest in Beethoven has declined after initial heavy exposure, but OTOH I have recently "discovered" Mozart - Tchaikovsky called him "a musical Christ" and I now think he was right!

Karajan gets a mixed response - I think partly because of the dodgy recording he got. DG's multimiking technique made his great orchestra sound flat. His EMI Schubert is far too boomy, exaggerating his romantic take on this essentially classical music. I recently bought a 2-CD set of Mozart divertimentos (DG) which I couldn't finish listening to, the sound was so glaring and congested.

Highlights: his Beethoven isn't as definitive as some claim, but has more power and passion than some more recent contenders. His Bruckner is often great, thought the DG cycle desperately needs remastering. I like his Tchaikovsky symphonies, which are surprisingly classical in their clarity. Some of his Mahler is a bit ordinary, but I esteem his 5th and Das Lied. I like his later EMI recordings of Sibelius. The Shostakovich 10th, of course.
post #1869 of 2199
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyeresist View Post

First classical music I bought when quite young was bargain discs of Bach, Beethoven and Mozart - the "greats". Years later I confess I still don't care for Bach, my interest in Beethoven has declined after initial heavy exposure, but OTOH I have recently "discovered" Mozart - Tchaikovsky called him "a musical Christ" and I now think he was right!

Karajan gets a mixed response - I think partly because of the dodgy recording he got. DG's multimiking technique made his great orchestra sound flat. His EMI Schubert is far too boomy, exaggerating his romantic take on this essentially classical music. I recently bought a 2-CD set of Mozart divertimentos (DG) which I couldn't finish listening to, the sound was so glaring and congested.

Highlights: his Beethoven isn't as definitive as some claim, but has more power and passion than some more recent contenders. His Bruckner is often great, thought the DG cycle desperately needs remastering. I like his Tchaikovsky symphonies, which are surprisingly classical in their clarity. Some of his Mahler is a bit ordinary, but I esteem his 5th and Das Lied. I like his later EMI recordings of Sibelius. The Shostakovich 10th, of course.


Karajan is very popular, but I recognize that there are several or more other conductors that are as or more important in the history of classical music.
post #1870 of 2199
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackskelly View Post

Karajan is very popular, but I recognize that there are several or more other conductors that are as or more important in the history of classical music.

 

Stokowski, Toscanini, Walter, Bernstein, Furtwangler, Reiner... all of these are on the top level with Karajan. For more limited repertoire there are dozens more.

post #1871 of 2199
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyeresist View Post

Karajan gets a mixed response - I think partly because of the dodgy recording he got. DG's multimiking technique made his great orchestra sound flat. His EMI Schubert is far too boomy, exaggerating his romantic take on this essentially classical music. I recently bought a 2-CD set of Mozart divertimentos (DG) which I couldn't finish listening to, the sound was so glaring and congested.

 

You bought the wrong copies. The remastered EMI and 60s DGG boxes sound phenomenal.

 

Schubert should be romantic, not classical.


Edited by bigshot - 6/9/14 at 9:35pm
post #1872 of 2199
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Stokowski, Toscanini, Walter, Bernstein, Furtwangler, Reiner... all of these are on the top level with Karajan. For more limited repertoire there are dozens more.

I don't think Karajan is on their level, nor is Lenny. But I certainly agree with the others and would include Szell.
post #1873 of 2199
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

Stokowski, Toscanini, Walter, Bernstein, Furtwangler, Reiner... all of these are on the top level with Karajan. For more limited repertoire there are dozens more.


Furtwangler just rolled in his grave hearing you mention his name like that with "Little K":basshead:

post #1874 of 2199

Szell is close. Furtwangler was dead when Karajan did his best work.

 

I totally understand blind spots. I have a few myself.

post #1875 of 2199
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

Szell is close. Furtwangler was dead when Karajan did his best work.

 

I totally understand blind spots. I have a few myself.


I think one of the problems with Karajan is the pure number of recordings there are out there. Some are pretty dismal and if you stumble upon those early you can have a dim view of his conducting. It takes some digging to collect his best works.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Music
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Best classical recordings...ever!