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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 115

post #1711 of 2334

 

With the neglect of Takemitsu's music being neglected in this thread I decided to post this.

One of the most prominent Japanese composers of the latter 20th century, November Steps is one of his greatest works.

 

I'm not typically a big Ozawa fan ( having lived in Boston during his tenure with the BSO )

but this is his greatest recording IMO.

post #1712 of 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post
 

 I would also add Harrison Birtwistle as well. 

 

 

 

 

I never really warmed completely to Birtwistle's music but he's certainly been a major figure of British contemporary music for some time.

 

Another comparable composer of the Ligeti/Carter generation would be Helmut Lachenmann.

Much of his music is beautifully represented on the Kairos record label for anyone interested in this sort of thing.

post #1713 of 2334

Yes Lachenmann, Luigi Nono's student and you can tell. Look also at the Col Legno recordings and also ECM new series for a brilliant live recording of is opera http://www.ecmrecords.com/Catalogue/New_Series/1800/1858.php

 

 

Well I'm now the proud owner of the Ligeti Teldec box set :D 

 

And I am thoroughly enjoying it. I'm thinking that the recorded sound is better and more spacious than the Sony (but I need to go back to the Sony to check)

 

Lovin it!!

 

 

 

Also, just another 20th Century piano work that needs no introduction but is one of the true masterworks of the last century. 

 

Shostakovich's homage to Bach. This recording is my recommendation with all things considered.  Great confidence with the difficult fugues, subtlety when required, and wonderful dynamic expression. Keeping it Russian sounding. Brilliant sound quality.

 

 

 

  

This is a nice Takemitsu disc on the Naxos label. I have a few of his recordings but I don't own the one above on Philips. He is a delightful composer, highly spiritual and his music is so calming. I have a compilation of his stuff for late at night! 

 

post #1714 of 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post
 

Yes Lachenmann, Luigi Nono's student and you can tell. Look also at the Col Legno recordings and also ECM new series for a brilliant live recording of is opera http://www.ecmrecords.com/Catalogue/New_Series/1800/1858.php

 

 

Well I'm now the proud owner of the Ligeti Teldec box set :D 

 

And I am thoroughly enjoying it. I'm thinking that the recorded sound is better and more spacious than the Sony (but I need to go back to the Sony to check)

 

Lovin it!!

 

 

 

 

Also, just another 20th Century piano work that needs no introduction but is one of the true masterworks of the last century. 

 

Shostakovich's homage to Bach. This recording is my recommendation with all things considered.  Great confidence with the difficult fugues, subtlety when required, and wonderful dynamic expression. Keeping it Russian sounding. Brilliant sound quality.

 

 

 

 

  

This is a nice Takemitsu disc on the Naxos label. I have a few of his recordings but I don't own the one above on Philips. He is a delightful composer, highly spiritual and his music is so calming. I have a compilation of his stuff for late at night! 

 

 

 

Good to hear. I just acquired the Teldec set as well to see how it stack up against the Sony version. I may have to bump the Prokofiev 50th anniversary edition out of the lineup to get to this first.

post #1715 of 2334

 

 

 

 

This movie was my first introduction to Takemitsu's music.

 

It's probably familiar to those of you who are familiar with classic Japanese cinema but to those who are not be forwarned;

This movie proceeds SLOWLY.Many folks consider it to be one of the greatest Japanese films of it's time however.

 

Takemitsu did lots of film work over his career and this score is his most distinctive IMO.

post #1716 of 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

 

 

 

 

This movie was my first introduction to Takemitsu's music.

 

It's probably familiar to those of you who are familiar with classic Japanese cinema but to those who are not be forwarned;

This movie proceeds SLOWLY.Many folks consider it to be one of the greatest Japanese films of it's time however.

 

Takemitsu did lots of film work over his career and this score is his most distinctive IMO.

funny you bring this up, when I read the earlier posts about Takemitsu I was trying to remember what was the Japanese movie that made me discover him, and sure enough it was "Woman in the Dunes". Great late night movie, if one is not too sleepy :-)

post #1717 of 2334

 

My first classical cd box ever was Complete Shostakovich String Quartets played by Russian Borodin Quartet.

 

Those days I lived in a dream for days, maybe weeks, this music took my totally by surprise. it is really special to me.

post #1718 of 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 

 

 

My first classical cd box ever was Complete Shostakovich String Quartets played by Russian Borodin Quartet.

 

 

 

:smile:

 

Not a bad start at all.

 

My very first classical cd box sets were(bought at the same time):

 

 

and....

 

 

 

My first LP box set was...

 

 

 

 

Your post indicating the adjective "first" got me nostalgic.

For me, once upon a time, vinyl records were the gateway into "lived in a dream for days, maybe weeks".

 

Vinyl box sets (like this one) of the 60s and 70s were treasures to me. 

The ritual of the record store and the apprehension of the PHYSICAL product and where it came from and the great mystery beyond that and back to my house with a room dedicated to this sort of thing etc........

post #1719 of 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

 

Vinyl box sets (like this one) of the 60s and 70s were treasures to me. 

The ritual of the record store and the apprehension of the PHYSICAL product and where it came from and the great mystery beyond that and back to my house with a room dedicated to this sort of thing etc........

 

Interestingly enough, digital issues of many (and a great deal more) of these wonderful recordings have made it easier for everyone (including me) to discover/re-discover many treasures indeed!!

post #1720 of 2334

My first classical vinyl box set was Karajan's Ring in the nice gold box. I went in the Wherehouse over and over and drooled over it on the shelf. It was so big and heavy and solid and GOLD! I saved up my meagre college pennies and bought it and wore the damn thing out.

 

I love the memory, but I don't love vinyl any more. I have over 15,000 records in my collection, and I wish they were all AAC files instead.

post #1721 of 2334
My first box was Fleisher's Beethoven concerti with Szell, some of which are still my favorite recordings of those pieces (such as no. 1; no. 3 is tied with Gould/Karajan; and no. 4 is not so far behind Schnabel/Stock).
post #1722 of 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 I saved up my meagre college pennies and bought it and wore the damn thing out.

 

I love the memory, but I don't love vinyl any more. I have over 15,000 records in my collection, and I wish they were all AAC files instead.

 

 

" I saved up my meagre college pennies and bought it and wore the damn thing out."

 

Yes Yes and YES.

Fully understood. Today's music obtaining culture can't appreciate what collecting music (by those who were not financially endowed) used to mean here.

I remember just getting good records, especially at times I lived away from major cities, could pose real logistical issues.

And much $.

 

 

 

 

"I love the memory, but I don't love vinyl any more. I have over 15,000 records in my collection, and I wish they were all AAC files instead."

 

I started selling off my vinyl 15 years ago and have never looked back.

I now have most of my old stuff (and many different/improved versions thereof) and much more.

These days access is FAR more convenient and the sound quality is so much more CONSISTENTLY great.

 

I do still find a lot of charm in my friends who maintain the old ways as well though.

They will not be easily replaced IMO.

They also tend to be the ones who know of other good (and great) records and further the digitization process to help me(and others) know more.

I am regularly amazed by the volume of old music which becomes new to me these days.

This is by no means limited to classical music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #1723 of 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claritas View Post

My first box was Fleisher's Beethoven concerti with Szell.

 

These are the recordings I first heard of those pieces

:beerchug:

 

Left a real impression.

post #1724 of 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post

These are the recordings I first heard of those pieces
beerchug.gif

Left a real impression.

biggrin.gif
post #1725 of 2334

My first box set was Bohm's Ring cycle. Loved it at the time but its probably my least favorite now of the more famous Ring sets. I rate both Solti and Karajan's (late 60's) over it. 

 

 

Talking about box sets does anyone have Bach's complete (or near complete) organ works? This is my choice. Lovely sound and the playing is very "Bach" (if there is such a thing :).  

 

 

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