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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 100

post #1486 of 2341

Anyone here a fan of solo piano music, especially of non-standard repertoire?

 

post #1487 of 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post

Bigshot got me thinking about life in 1914.
Actually a very remarkable year:

 http://www.historyorb.com/events/date/1914

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1914_in_music

I don't know if the list is accurate. For example, it lists the Prokofiev violin concerto (no. 1).
post #1488 of 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claritas View Post


http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1914_in_music

I don't know if the list is accurate. For example, it lists the Prokofiev violin concerto (no. 1).

 

Also lacking from list:

 

One of Charles Ives greatest works "The Three Places in New England" was "mostly" completed in 1914.

post #1489 of 2341

It wasn't published in 1914 though.

post #1490 of 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claritas View Post


http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1914_in_music

I don't know if the list is accurate. For example, it lists the Prokofiev violin concerto (no. 1).

 

Fascinating list IMO.

post #1491 of 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

It wasn't published in 1914 though.

 

Hey take it easy there...

 

I said "mostly".:smile:

post #1492 of 2341

post #1493 of 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

It wasn't published in 1914 though.

 

One of the interesting things about Ives is many of his greatest works

(like The Three pieces, Concord Sonata and the 4th Symphony)

were all regarded as processes of long term reflection and revision rather than one object to be completed for an occasion.

 

This is partly because he was an insurance salesman and very few people of his time(1914 etc..) could recognize the importance of his work.

Even fewer would pay for any of it.

post #1494 of 2341
post #1495 of 2341

Andreas "The Voice" Scholl and Philippe Jaroussky singing Purcell's duet "Sound the Trumpet" with some modern improvisations.

 

 

A funny article about their collaboration: http://www.theguardian.com/music/2010/dec/06/andreas-scholl-phillipe-jaroussky-countertenors.

post #1496 of 2341

Pieter Wispelwey' s 2nd recording of Bach's Cello Suites is the definitive version in my opinion and very well recorded to.

 

 

http://www.channelclassics.com/pieter-wispelwey-suites-for-violoncello-solo.html

 

This is one of the best sounding symphony orchestra recordings ever made:

 

http://www.linnrecords.com/recording-rachmaninov--symphonic-dances.aspx

 

And this guy must be the ''worlds best trumpet player'' Lovely choice of repertoire and incredible well recorded.

http://www.soundliaison.com/products-from-our-studio-masters/71-andre-heuvelman

post #1497 of 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by christian u View Post
 

Pieter Wispelwey' s 2nd recording of Bach's Cello Suites is the definitive version in my opinion and very well recorded to.

 

one should be careful with using the word "definitive" (even if tempered by "in my opinion") for a sacred cow like the Cello Suites, unless they are trying to start a heated discussion...

 

Having only heard Suite No 1 so far, I would say that Wispelwey is trying too hard, waaay too hard, to sound different from the other 666 recordings of the Suites. He does manage to do that, but in the process he takes takes so many liberties with the phrasing of the music that it almost becomes a parody. I also found incredibly annoying his continuous tapping on the cello. Is this meant to be authentic practice or just another way to attract attention to his performance? Definitely worth a listen, and thanks for the pointer, but much less "definitive" then say Fournier or Bylsma.

post #1498 of 2341

I started listening to the 3rd(!) recording of the Cello Suites by Wispelwey. Suite #1 is even more extreme than in the 2nd cycle you recommended. The guy obviously likes to epater les bourgeois!

post #1499 of 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by calaf View Post

one should be careful with using the word "definitive" (even if tempered by "in my opinion") for a sacred cow like the Cello Suites, unless they are trying to start a heated discussion...

Having only heard Suite No 1 so far, I would say that Wispelwey is trying too hard, waaay too hard, to sound different from the other 666 recordings of the Suites. He does manage to do that, but in the process he takes takes so many liberties with the phrasing of the music that it almost becomes a parody. I also found incredibly annoying his continuous tapping on the cello. Is this meant to be authentic practice or just another way to attract attention to his performance? Definitely worth a listen, and thanks for the pointer, but much less "definitive" then say Fournier or Bylsma.

I've never been able to make it through any rendition without falling asleep. Maybe I should try a piano transcription.
post #1500 of 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claritas View Post


I've never been able to make it through any rendition without falling asleep. Maybe I should try a piano transcription.

One suite, maximum two, is the limit of my attention span. That's the problem with Bach music (which I love): it is hard work!

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