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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 97

post #1441 of 8942

post #1442 of 8942

=========================:eek:===============================

post #1443 of 8942

One of the best recordings ever?

post #1444 of 8942

post #1445 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

I love your choices of contempoprary music.

 

I did record a couple of Slowind Festivals:

 

 http://www.slowind.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=115:15-festival-slowind&catid=54:aktualno

 

http://www.slowind.org/index.php?Itemid=0&catid=12&id=200&lang=en&option=com_contact&view=contact

 

As a matter of fact, they are touring ( maybe just finished ? ) the USA at the moment :

 

http://www.soka.edu/news_events/events/2014/02/Slowind.aspx

 

http://scupresents.org/performances/music-noon-slowind-wind-quintet

 

Slowind Festivals, held yearly in the autumn and generally spanning over a week or so, are truly the feast for the contemporary music lovers - often composers participate in person ( George Crumb, Elliot Carter, Vinko Globokar , ... ).

 

 

 

Here a wind quintet by Primož Ramovš http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primo%C5%BE_Ramov%C5%A1

 

 

that Slowind themselves also play(ed) often. This is perhaps the most "normal" composition by late Primož Ramovš - normally, his music is FAR more "crazy avantgarde". Interesting - his son, Klemen Ramovš, specializes in Early  (renaissance ) Music and organizes  

http://www.seviqc-brezice.si/index.php/home-en-GB/

 

This year, composer Lojze Lebič http://sl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lojze_Lebi%C4%8D

is turning 80 and numerous concerts and even works by younger composers are dedicated to commemorate the occasion. Mr. Lebič is almost always present at good interesting concerts, so we meet on regular basis. Here his Quintet for winds as performed by Slowind in New York in 2006 :

 


Edited by analogsurviver - 3/4/14 at 11:50pm
post #1446 of 8942

That first one sounds like a subway station

post #1447 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

That first one sounds like a subway station

No subway over here - but contemporary music can be a *bit* hard to stomach on recordings; it works best as a performance experienced live. Particularly music that incorporates electronic means - up to a laptop per musician on the stage ...


Edited by analogsurviver - 3/5/14 at 11:01am
post #1448 of 8942

With a live performance, I can get up out of my seat and hear what it sounds like from the other side of the hall... or from the lobby... or from the bar and grill two blocks away!

post #1449 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

With a live performance, I can get up out of my seat and hear what it sounds like from the other side of the hall... or from the lobby... or from the bar and grill two blocks away!

 

One of the advantages of listening to recordings of contemporary music as opposed to live performances is

the lack of pouty, whining and uncomfortable people that often happen to be in the audience.

 

I can't understand why people attend concerts of modern/contemporary,difficult music if they don't like it.

Yet they continue to be present at many concerts I attend.Often their impatience and discomfort is followed by tired juvenile jokes

like "well it ain't Brahms(chuckle, chuckle..)" or "it sounds like a train.."


Edited by perhapss - 3/5/14 at 6:55pm
post #1450 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post
 

I love your choices of contempoprary music.

 

I did record a couple of Slowind Festivals:

 

 http://www.slowind.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=115:15-festival-slowind&catid=54:aktualno

 

http://www.slowind.org/index.php?Itemid=0&catid=12&id=200&lang=en&option=com_contact&view=contact

 

As a matter of fact, they are touring ( maybe just finished ? ) the USA at the moment :

 

http://www.soka.edu/news_events/events/2014/02/Slowind.aspx

 

http://scupresents.org/performances/music-noon-slowind-wind-quintet

 

Slowind Festivals, held yearly in the autumn and generally spanning over a week or so, are truly the feast for the contemporary music lovers - often composers participate in person ( George Crumb, Elliot Carter, Vinko Globokar , ... ).

 

 

 

Here a wind quintet by Primož Ramovš http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primo%C5%BE_Ramov%C5%A1

 

 

that Slowind themselves also play(ed) often. This is perhaps the most "normal" composition by late Primož Ramovš - normally, his music is FAR more "crazy avantgarde". Interesting - his son, Klemen Ramovš, specializes in Early  (renaissance ) Music and organizes  

http://www.seviqc-brezice.si/index.php/home-en-GB/

 

This year, composer Lojze Lebič http://sl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lojze_Lebi%C4%8D

is turning 80 and numerous concerts and even works by younger composers are dedicated to commemorate the occasion. Mr. Lebič is almost always present at good interesting concerts, so we meet on regular basis. Here his Quintet for winds as performed by Slowind in New York in 2006 :

 

 

 

Thanks for the links!

I'll check them out when home this evening...

post #1451 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

 

One of the advantages of listening to recordings of contemporary music as opposed to live performances is

he lack of pouty, whining and uncomfortable people that often happen to be in the audience.

 

I can't understand why people attend concerts of modern/contemporary,difficult music if they don't like it.

Yet they continue to be present at many concerts I attend.Often their impatience and discomfort is followed by tired juvenile jokes

like "well it ain't Brahms(chuckle, chuckle..)" or "it sounds like a train.."

 

To be fair, This attitude I've found to be most prevalent on audiences in the USA.

In other countries I've seen MUCH less of it.

post #1452 of 8942

It would help a lot if venues would advertise these sorts of concerts as "Coming May 19th: A Program of Music You Probably Don't Like". Then it would be a lot harder to end up in one of these concerts by accident.

post #1453 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

It would help a lot if venues would advertise these sorts of concerts as "Coming May 19th: A Program of Music You Probably Don't Like". Then it would be a lot harder to end up in one of these concerts by accident.

I try to gather some information regarding the music to be played on concerts I am considering attending. Nowadays, with Youtube, no longer so hard as it used to be.

 

 Definition of opera I used to subscribe to:

 

Little Johny: Father, what is opera ?

John, the father: Well - let me think; suppose two guys fall in love with the same girl. In olden days, they staged duels in such cases, like swords, pistols or any other mutually agreed weapon. Then one guy mortally wounds the other, and the one that should fall to the ground and die, starts screaming almost without end....

 

Yet - I DO - and did - recognize opera as perhaps the hardest form of art to get right ; there is singing, acting, dancing, music - all intertwined, very small error in either considerably deterring from the intents of the composer. No matter how far fetched some plots may appear to some people - but I NEVER ridiculed opera or passed unfit remarks. In every endeavor of man, there is study, work, preparation, rehearsals, sweat and tears put into it; if I prefere barbecue 2 blocks away with niiiiice looking waitresses over opera, I am at the barbecue - and enjoy - while letting opera lovers enjoying their poison.

post #1454 of 8942

You'd like Homer and Jethro!

 

post #1455 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

It would help a lot if venues would advertise these sorts of concerts as "Coming May 19th: A Program of Music You Probably Don't Like". Then it would be a lot harder to end up in one of these concerts by accident.

 

There seem to be two approaches to programming modern works alongside classics: stick the modern work on the first part of the program so everyone has to sit through it (or risks coming late to the second part) or stick it at the end so people can leave early. I go to piano recitals, where the repertoire is even more standardized, so the problem doesn't come up.

 

My old man really enjoys modernism, which he calls "the music of my time." I like to say that I too enjoy the music of my time: the Baroque.

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