or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Best classical recordings...ever!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 92

post #1366 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rem1x View Post
 

Anyone have any recommendations for composers that have a dark, "gothic" style.  Something with cello, piano, violin perhaps.

 

I like dark, sad sounding classical, but it is hard for me to find composers I really like.
 

post #1367 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by sh4dowd4ncer View Post
 

It is interesting how Karajan connection with the BPO makes him a German.

 

Since it was twice mentioned, just for the record:

Karajan was Austrian.

He was born in Austria and is buried in Austria.

 

I guess that makes Rattle a "German" too.:evil:

 

Regarding Karajan, I feel he can often lean more Austrian than German in style.

German style(especially of the early 20th century) to me is epitomized in folks like Hans Knapperbusch.

 

Indeed, Karajan's popular appeal was helped along a bit by embracing more of a "sensual" sensibility that I personally associate with Vienna.

Of course IMO.

 

Regarding "loosey goosey":

Many of the old Germans in my family regarded Austrians as the "lazy Germans".

Not my opinion but...

 

EDIT: "Early 20th century" meaning 1st half.Again IMO.


Edited by perhapss - 2/12/14 at 11:21am
post #1368 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rem1x View Post
 

Anyone have any recommendations for composers that have a dark, "gothic" style.  Something with cello, piano, violin perhaps.

 

I like dark, sad sounding classical, but it is hard for me to find composers I really like.
 

 

Search youtube for Anton Webern, Arnold Schoenberg and Alban Berg.

post #1369 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

 

I guess that makes Rattle a "German" too.:evil:

 

Regarding Karajan, I feel he can often lean more Austrian than German in style.

German style(especially of the early 20th century) to me is epitomized in folks like Hans Knapperbusch.

 

Indeed, Karajan's popular appeal was helped along a bit by embracing more of a "sensual" sensibility that I personally associate with Vienna.

Of course IMO.

 

Regarding "loosey goosey":

Many of the old Germans in my family regarded Austrians as the "lazy Germans".

Not my opinion but...


Indeed.

This multi cultural environment causes such mixes: style, motherland, school, and so on.

In the end, like previously posted the thing is: music is about "unite".

And it does not matter if Karajan was born in Salzburg or in the Moon.

It matters what he did in life and how a lot of people enjoy it.

post #1370 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rem1x View Post
 

Anyone have any recommendations for composers that have a dark, "gothic" style.  Something with cello, piano, violin perhaps.

 

I like dark, sad sounding classical, but it is hard for me to find composers I really like.
 

 

A fellow Debbie Downer :p started a thread about that recently: http://www.head-fi.org/t/702568/recommend-me-your-favorite-classical-or-opera-cds.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by sh4dowd4ncer View Post
 

It is interesting how Karajan connection with the BPO makes him a German.

 

Since it was twice mentioned, just for the record:

Karajan was Austrian.

He was born in Austria and is buried in Austria.

 

I wouldn't want him. He was a member of the Legion of Doom.

post #1371 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by crimbo912 View Post
 

 

Good call. :smile: 

post #1372 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claritas View Post
 

 

 

I wouldn't want him. He was a member of the Legion of Doom.

 

I personally like to think of Karajan's performance of Holst as a sort of "olive branch".

Then again I'm a bit of an idealist...

post #1373 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rem1x View Post
 

Anyone have any recommendations for composers that have a dark, "gothic" style.  Something with cello, piano, violin perhaps.

 

I like dark, sad sounding classical, but it is hard for me to find composers I really like.
 

 

If my first recommendation is a little extreme try Arvo Part or Valentin Silvestrov.

post #1374 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rem1x View Post
 

Anyone have any recommendations for composers that have a dark, "gothic" style.  Something with cello, piano, violin perhaps.

 

I like dark, sad sounding classical, but it is hard for me to find composers I really like.
 

Pärt has already been mentioned... I'd consider 'Spiegel im Spiegel' to be a piece as evocative of sadness as beauty... The ECM disc w/ two recordings of 'Für Alina' has three recordings of 'Spiegel im Spiegel' - two for piano and violin, and one for piano and cello. 

 

Tavener's 'The Last Sleep of the Virgin' for strings and handbell has a haunting, sad beauty about it in my mind. I'd go for the recording of the Chilingirian Quartet with Iain Simcock on handbells.

 

Cliché, but Górecki's 3rd symphony is known as the 'Symphony of Sorrowful Songs' for good reason... And also for good reason, the recording with Dawn Upshaw on Nonesuch has proven quite popular, I'd easily choose it over the (two?) others I have.

 

The ECM disc, 'Neharót,' is rather dark, with some decidedly sad viola work from Kim Kashkashian, the highlight being the title track, 'Neharót Neharót' by Betty Olivero.

 

Enjoy your sad journey! :)


Edited by brhfl - 2/12/14 at 12:57pm
post #1375 of 9002

Wow! 

 

I got more help than I anticipated. 

 

I have a lot to try out now, thanks so much guys.

 

post #1376 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

Regarding "loosey goosey":

Many of the old Germans in my family regarded Austrians as the "lazy Germans".

 

It was imprecise language I'm afraid. By loosey goosey, I meant meandering and formless (not necessarily in a bad way). I find that I like Ralph Vaughan Williams and Gustav Holst's music better when the conductor focuses on structure and more regular rhythms. That's what I mean by the Berlin approach. Viennese conducting style to me is more dance-like and spontaneous. Generalizations to be sure.

post #1377 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

It was imprecise language I'm afraid. By loosey goosey, I meant meandering and formless (not necessarily in a bad way). I find that I like Ralph Vaughan Williams and Gustav Holst's music better when the conductor focuses on structure and more regular rhythms. That's what I mean by the Berlin approach. Viennese conducting style to me is more dance-like and spontaneous. Generalizations to be sure.

 

Understood.

 

Your post also made me think there is not enough regarding Vaughn Williams on this thread.

Definitely would appreciate any opinions regarding his symphony recordings.

 

I've heard and enjoyed various here and there and own the Haitink set but I've been wanting to explore more....

post #1378 of 9002
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

It was imprecise language I'm afraid. By loosey goosey, I meant meandering and formless (not necessarily in a bad way). I find that I like Ralph Vaughan Williams and Gustav Holst's music better when the conductor focuses on structure and more regular rhythms. That's what I mean by the Berlin approach. Viennese conducting style to me is more dance-like and spontaneous. Generalizations to be sure.

 

Understood.

 

Your post also made me think there is not enough regarding Vaughn Williams on this thread.

Definitely would appreciate any opinions regarding his symphony recordings.

 

I've heard and enjoyed various here and there and own the Haitink set but I've been wanting to explore more....

You can't go wrong wth Previn/LSO for a set.  For a highlight, check out the Romanza from the 5th symphony - the orchestral playing towards the end of the movement takes my breath away.  For individual recordings, Bryden Thomson with the LSO are hidden gems (like a lot of his recordings (Elgar symphonies)).  Hickox/LSO on Chandos or demonstration worthy, spectacularly recorded affairs.  Barbirolli shines on the 5th with the Philharmonia and VW's own reading of the 4th is a brilliannt fiery performance and a very interesting historical document.

post #1379 of 9002

I am not sure if I should start a new thread about it (as I just figured out bigshot did for the Living Stereo Vol 2 in Amazon UK).

If it is wrong, moderators move it please.

 

It is a bit more than 1USD per CD.

Half of the US Amazon price

In my opinion a nice bargain.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the-symphony-edition/id665376720

post #1380 of 9002

I bought that Abbado box, and although it would be fine for a beginner, almost nothing in it was really good. I kind of liked the live Mozart and the Mahler was OK. But the Mendelssohn and Schubert were dull and the Beethoven was pretty generic. For this sort of collection, the Columbia Bernstein box was a lot better.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Music
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Best classical recordings...ever!