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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 91

post #1351 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post
 

It has been awhile since I posted in this thread, save for the unfortunately late Maestro Abbado.

 

Today something different - not a recording made ages and generations ago, scrutinized and reviewed ad nuseaum - and hailed as best in span of the recording history.

See the youth heralding next generation(s) of classical musicians:

 

Livestream Ljubljana International Orchestra
 

 

KNUT ERIK SUNDQUIST

ONE OF THE FINEST DOUBLE BASS PLAYERS IN THE WORLD

 
Dear friends,
 
we would like to have you all here in our beautiful Ljubljana attending the Nordic Wind concert with Knut-Erik Sundquist on double bass and conducting. Since this is kind of impossible, we arranged live streaming of Ljubljana International Orchestra concert on Sunday at 19.30.


You are kindly invited to join us at:
http://new.livestream.com/zivo/BSA?query=ljubljana&cat=event

 


Mednarodni orkester Ljubljana 
Soloist and conductor: Knut Erik Sundquist – double bass
concert master: Gregory Ahss
 
Program:
L. E. Larsson: 
G. Bottesini: 
C. Nielsen: 
E. Grieg: 
E. Grieg: 
J. Sibelius: 

Enjoy, have fun and take care, your BSA team 


 

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Copyright © 2014 Branimir Slokar Academy, All rights reserved.

You have been previously interested in the Branimir Slokar Academy

 

Time is GMT+1, this Sunday  starting at 19:30.

 

Sound provided by yours truly

 

analogsurviver

 

(as I type this, rehearsal of the Bottessini piece is in progress...-  with red LED denoting recording blinking on my Korg MR1000 modified recorder)

 

 

 

BIG post man:p

 

Good to see you back in the thread....

post #1352 of 8942

Now playing... This one gets better the farther you get from the Sun.  Neptune is out of this world.

 


Edited by Delirious Lab - 2/11/14 at 7:07pm
post #1353 of 8942

The Planets is one of the things I think Karajan does particularly well. I don't know why he would be the one for a British composer, but who knows.

post #1354 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

The Planets is one of the things I think Karajan does particularly well. I don't know why he would be the one for a British composer, but who knows.

Agreed. Particularly Saturn from his 1962 Decca recording is outstanding.

 

Another thing he does particularly well is Tchaikovsky.

post #1355 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

 

BIG post man:p

 

Good to see you back in the thread....

I was RATing ( RAT = race against time ) - to post the link as soon as I got it - while doing normal work with recording the rehearsal. Touchpad on my netbook is  bit iffy and

that is the way the post got bigger than absolutely necessary.

post #1356 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post
 

Agreed. Particularly Saturn from his 1962 Decca recording is outstanding.

 

Another thing he does particularly well is Tchaikovsky.

This is interesting. I agree about Tchaikovsky but only for the Symphonies World.

For Ballet Suite I would stick with the Russians.

As I previously posted in this thread, two examples of a really fine reading of Tchaikovsky ballet:

 

 

But, on the other side, if we are talking symphonies, then Karajan got it nice.

post #1357 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by sh4dowd4ncer View Post
 

This is interesting. I agree about Tchaikovsky but only for the Symphonies World.

For Ballet Suite I would stick with the Russians.

As I previously posted in this thread, two examples of a really fine reading of Tchaikovsky ballet:

 

 

But, on the other side, if we are talking symphonies, then Karajan got it nice.

Errata corrige - I did have his symphonies in mind; elsewhere in Tchaikovsky he was not so great.

 

Not surprising given his genealogy : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_von_Karajan ; his mother was from my country, Slovenia, therefore he had Slavic genes.

 

Shostakovich got severely repremanded by Stalin etc after declaring Herbert Karajan (the first time after the WW II a German orchestra under German conductor was allowed to play in the Soviet Union; although he was not given the "Comrade", they certainly did nor allow for  "von" ...) much better conveying the Stalingrad Battle Symphony ( No ? ) than any Soviet Conductor ; some lesser known and less hailed composer would have probably "disappeared in the fog" for such a statement...

 

It only shows that music unites; even at that ocassion, Soviet orchestra under Soviet conductor played German composed music and vice versa. Shostakovich was merely being amazed and honest in his statement, forgetting for a moment what implications that could have meant for him. Great man.


Edited by analogsurviver - 2/12/14 at 3:45am
post #1358 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

The Planets is one of the things I think Karajan does particularly well. I don't know why he would be the one for a British composer, but who knows.
I can't agree with this. I've always found both Karajan versions strange in their execution. The brass playing is all off as well for me. They sound stiff and inflexible in their rhythmic approach. I've always loved the Stokowski and Mehta recordings, both with the LA Phil. There are a few great English versions too, like Boult with the LPO and Previn with the RPO.
post #1359 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by amigomatt View Post

I can't agree with this. I've always found both Karajan versions strange in their execution. The brass playing is all off as well for me. They sound stiff and inflexible in their rhythmic approach. I've always loved the Stokowski and Mehta recordings, both with the LA Phil. There are a few great English versions too, like Boult with the LPO and Previn with the RPO.
For The Planets I think Charles Dudoit's with Montreal guys is also worth listening.
post #1360 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by sh4dowd4ncer View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by amigomatt View Post

I can't agree with this. I've always found both Karajan versions strange in their execution. The brass playing is all off as well for me. They sound stiff and inflexible in their rhythmic approach. I've always loved the Stokowski and Mehta recordings, both with the LA Phil. There are a few great English versions too, like Boult with the LPO and Previn with the RPO.
For The Planets I think Charles Dudoit's with Montreal guys is also worth listening.
Oh yeah, forgot about that one!

The organ at the end of Saturn is captured gloriously!
post #1361 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by amigomatt View Post

I can't agree with this. I've always found both Karajan versions strange in their execution. The brass playing is all off as well for me. They sound stiff and inflexible in their rhythmic approach. I've always loved the Stokowski and Mehta recordings, both with the LA Phil. There are a few great English versions too, like Boult with the LPO and Previn with the RPO.

Not a fan of the Karajan Planets either. Dutoit, Mehta, Previn, mentioned already, tend to be my go-tos. I'll throw another into the ring here: St. Louis under Susskind. Fantastic (analog) recording... even if the interpretation is a bit... casual... at times, it's well worth a listen.

post #1362 of 8942
Quote:
Originally Posted by amigomatt View Post


I can't agree with this. I've always found both Karajan versions strange in their execution. The brass playing is all off as well for me. They sound stiff and inflexible in their rhythmic approach. I've always loved the Stokowski and Mehta recordings, both with the LA Phil. There are a few great English versions too, like Boult with the LPO and Previn with the RPO.

 

Yeah, I like all of those too. The thing is, unidiomatic as it is, I think Karajan's weird military sort of approach works. British composers can tend towards being loosey goosey. It takes a German to make them snap to attention.

post #1363 of 8942

It is interesting how Karajan connection with the BPO makes him a German.

 

Since it was twice mentioned, just for the record:

Karajan was Austrian.

He was born in Austria and is buried in Austria.

post #1364 of 8942

His style in a lot of things is more Berlin than Vienna.

post #1365 of 8942

Anyone have any recommendations for composers that have a dark, "gothic" style.  Something with cello, piano, violin perhaps.

 

I like dark, sad sounding classical, but it is hard for me to find composers I really like.
 

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