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Best classical recordings...ever! - Page 72

post #1066 of 8949
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

Schwarzkopf was one of the greatest singers who ever lived. It doesn't get much better than her.

 

Word.

post #1067 of 8949

 

Perhaps not directly related but famous words from Strauss:

 

Ten Golden Rules For the Album of a Young Conductor

  1. Remember that you are making music not to amuse yourself, but to delight your audience.
  2. You should not perspire when conducting: only the audience should get warm.
  3. Conduct Salome and Elektra as if they were Mendelssohn: Fairy Music.
  4. Never look encouragingly at the brass, except with a brief glance to give an important cue.
  5. But never let the horns and woodwinds out of your sight. If you can hear them at all they are still too strong.
  6. If you think that the brass is now blowing hard enough, tone it down another shade or two.
  7. It is not enough that you yourself should hear every word the soloist sings. You should know it by heard anyway. The audience must be able to follow without effort. If they do not understand the words they will go to sleep.
  8. Always accompany the singer in such a way that he can sing without effort.
  9. When you think you have reached the limits of prestissimo, double the pace.
  10. If you follow these rules carefully you will, with your fine gifts and your great accomplishments, always be the darling of your listeners
post #1068 of 8949
I guess I am not the biggest Richard Strauss fan :rolleyes:
post #1069 of 8949
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 

 

I'm not trying to be a (total)pain in the #@# and please don't take me too personally.

Like many humans I sometimes try to justify/bias my emotions and opinions.

 

Sometimes I'm not happy with facts though:angry_face:.

For example:

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2006/aug/24/classicalmusicandopera.secondworldwar

 

For me the important thing is the music but people are complicated...

post #1070 of 8949

And here's some music Richard Strauss clearly disliked in historically important recordings:

 

 

Strauss:

 

"The only person who can help poor Schoenberg now is a psychiatrist…. I think he’d do better to shovel snow instead of scribbling on music paper."

post #1071 of 8949

The Strauss in the Living Stereo box is fantastic. Reiner was very similar in style to Strauss when it came to conducting. Not a lot of movement or emotion. Just a quiet laser beam.

post #1072 of 8949
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

 

When I read this I interpret your comment to mean the Schwarzkopf is less superficial and has more depth,Is this correct?

 

Maybe "more faceted" would be a preferred metaphor? More angles to view the work from rather than a particularly strong focus provided by the performers. Because it is not the most (fill blank) I suggested it would probably be unlikely to impress one-off as much as alternatives. I'm sure most folks would come to value it through aquaintance.

post #1073 of 8949
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

The Strauss in the Living Stereo box is fantastic. Reiner was very similar in style to Strauss when it came to conducting. Not a lot of movement or emotion. Just a quiet laser beam.

 

Agreed.

Also another conductor who knew Strauss personally.

post #1074 of 8949
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisjackson View Post
 

Maybe "more faceted" would be a preferred metaphor? More angles to view the work from rather than a particularly strong focus provided by the performers. Because it is not the most (fill blank) I suggested it would probably be unlikely to impress one-off as much as alternatives. I'm sure most folks would come to value it through aquaintance.

Ok maybe I understand better.

 

For me the Szell/Shwarzkopf achieves it's depth through clarity,simplicity and neglecting unessential gestures.

The text is mostly very subtle writing emphasizing quiet, repose, acceptance etc.

When the light emerges in the text Shwarzkopf brings it out naturally and clearly.

 

The Norman version is so heavily adorned with varying tonal inflection that the simplicity of the text is often obscured IMO.

It reminds me of a rock concert in that it lacks subtlety.

The performance seems like it is more about Jessye Norman than it is about the writing in the text.

To me the text's emphasis on nostalgia, death and lightness of being(so to speak) hardly call for such a histrionic performance.

Of course this in my opinion.

 

Still great audiophile demo material though:evil:.

post #1075 of 8949
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

Also another conductor who knew Strauss personally.

 

I think Toscanini knew him better.

post #1076 of 8949

Milan Kundera and a man who doesn't know what to do with his hat. Must be time for bed...

Quinto will enjoy the unbiased account on this collaboration : "eminent soprano Elisabeth Schwarzkopf and eccentric pianist Glenn Gould..."
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Sony/88725441362

post #1077 of 8949
Quote:
Originally Posted by perhapss View Post
 

Ok maybe I understand better.

 

For me the Szell/Shwarzkopf achieves it's depth through clarity,simplicity and neglecting unessential gestures.

The text is mostly very subtle writing emphasizing quiet, repose, acceptance etc.

When the light emerges in the text Shwarzkopf brings it out naturally and clearly.

 

The Norman version is so heavily adorned with varying tonal inflection that the simplicity of the text is often obscured IMO.

It reminds me of a rock concert in that it lacks subtlety.

The performance seems like it is more about Jessye Norman than it is about the writing in the text.

To me the text's emphasis on nostalgia, death and lightness of being(so to speak) hardly call for such a histrionic performance.

Of course this in my opinion.

 

Still great audiophile demo material though:evil:.

Oh dear. The ultimate death knell for any recording.:D

 

I would take Swarzkopf or Flagstad over Norman anyday. Norman was just too "hollywood" for me.

post #1078 of 8949
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

I think Toscanini knew him better.

 

I would never dismiss Toscanini's accomplishments either.

post #1079 of 8949

The famous Toscanini quote is, "To Strauss the musician, I take off my hat. To Strauss the man, I put it back on again."

post #1080 of 8949

What's a good resource to learn more about Classical music and history? I have no idea what the **** you guys are talking about, but I really want to. :)

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