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DIY Woody Grado/Symphones Magnums - A build diary - Page 3

post #31 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrislangley4253 View Post

seems like it was a great learning experience. Maybe you should have saved that wood, but live and learn man.

Looks like he's got plenty of that plank left. :) Looks great, going to wax/varnish it or wait until the next version?

post #32 of 121

I used to do my cups on a toolroom lathe. I made a 'mandrel' out of 1/2" threaded rod, which had two tapered bushings made from a dense hardwood. I would cut my blanks close to round on the bandsaw, drill a 3/4" hole straight through them, and then mount on the mandrel. After profiling the outside (with my lathe converted to a tracer lathe) I would chuck up the cup directly in the lathe and bore out the inside.

 

The reason for starting with the 3/4" hole was so that I could bore them out from there, and it would be mostly on center.

 

Are you planning on finishing the cups anyway to see how they look? Dewaxed shellac + clear gloss lacquer is my goto for really nice pieces. Cyanoacrylate is great but doesn't have the depth or KABLOW!!! of the aforementioned finish.

 

That said, there are 10,000 ways to finish a wood project and each of them is good for different reasons...

post #33 of 121
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by taiden View Post

I used to do my cups on a toolroom lathe. I made a 'mandrel' out of 1/2" threaded rod, which had two tapered bushings made from a dense hardwood. I would cut my blanks close to round on the bandsaw, drill a 3/4" hole straight through them, and then mount on the mandrel. After profiling the outside (with my lathe converted to a tracer lathe) I would chuck up the cup directly in the lathe and bore out the inside.

 

The reason for starting with the 3/4" hole was so that I could bore them out from there, and it would be mostly on center.

 

Are you planning on finishing the cups anyway to see how they look? Dewaxed shellac + clear gloss lacquer is my goto for really nice pieces. Cyanoacrylate is great but doesn't have the depth or KABLOW!!! of the aforementioned finish.

 

That said, there are 10,000 ways to finish a wood project and each of them is good for different reasons...

 

I started with the centre bolt to mount, but i think the bolts weren't totally straight which threw things off by a little. Also it wasn't easy getting the forstner bit lines up directly in the centre either. I think next time i'll hole saw the rough cylinders, then drill out with the 32mm drill, forstner all the way in (to the grille lip) and mount off that inside hole every time, that way everything should be in line. I do plan on trying a finish on these, i was thinking of starting with tung oil and going from there. Oh, and i do now have a working pair of headphones, pics to follow...
post #34 of 121
Thread Starter 

Right then, drilled a few holes this afternoon.  The mountings don't need to go all the way through...

 

 

Borrowing the gimbals from my SR80s...

 

 

The hole for the cable/connector will need to be countersunk if i am to use the SMC connectors, since the wall thickness is too great to allow any of the thread to be exposed.  In a way that's good, since less of the connector assembly will be exposed.

 

 

Borrowed headband from my HF2s and suddenly i have a pair of headphones.

 

After a little soldering i really do have a pair of headphones...

 

 

The cable is a Grado extension cord hacked up (i've used bits of it for mobile mini-mini interconnects and other adapters). 

 

 

I put a solder joint in just upstream of the drivers so i don't have to desolder the pads every time i take them out, but i won't show you that as it looks a little dodgy with no heatsrink or anything redface.gif

 

And modelled by yours truly:

 

 

And yes, i am listening to them as i type this smily_headphones1.gif

post #35 of 121

Nice work, this is probably one of my favorite threads right now. I would love to get a pair of cups out of that block, the wood looks so unique.

post #36 of 121

For your first go you did a good job. How do you like the magnum drivers?

post #37 of 121

They look really good and quite unique, I would love to have a set of those cups.

post #38 of 121
Very nice! How do they sound?
post #39 of 121
Thread Starter 
First impressions are that they don't suck, which is always a plus. I think they've got more bass oomph than my RS1s, and compare favorably in every other area, but they're only 10 hours old and i haven't done any back to back comparisons yet. Still getting to know them fully but i like what i hear so far.
post #40 of 121

Your build has inspired me to buy a wood lathe. I'm looking around for one. I'd really like to make my own cups.

post #41 of 121
Thread Starter 

Sorry about your wallet...

post #42 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7keys View Post

Your build has inspired me to buy a wood lathe. I'm looking around for one. I'd really like to make my own cups.

 

Pick up the harbor freight 10" lathe. It's easily the best bang for the buck and will pay for itself the first time you make something. Also go for the PSI high speed steel midi lathe chisel set. Then grab some kind of chuck. About $400 in and you should be going strong. Upgrade to a nicer lathe later and use the harbor freight lathe as a buffer / finishing rig.

post #43 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by taiden View Post

 

Pick up the harbor freight 10" lathe. It's easily the best bang for the buck and will pay for itself the first time you make something. Also go for the PSI high speed steel midi lathe chisel set. Then grab some kind of chuck. About $400 in and you should be going strong. Upgrade to a nicer lathe later and use the harbor freight lathe as a buffer / finishing rig.


I was thinking about this.

 

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/6-Tools-in1MINI-Classic-Wood-Metal-Lathe-Milling-Machine-Jig-saw-Driller-Grinder-/110883632888?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19d12df6f8

post #44 of 121
Thread Starter 

 

Those look great on paper, but i've found that with tools you do tend to get what you pay for, with so many functions at that price point i would be very surprised if there wasn't a compromise or two.
post #45 of 121

You're probably right but I thought since I don't have a drill press I'd need something to guide the forstner bit..

 

I have to ask myself.

 

"how much does one spend to make a single pair of headphones"

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