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Audio-GD NFB-1.32 - Page 8

post #106 of 120

This one looks pretty nice. I will try it right now.

But nevertheless I will build my self a music server, based on a raspberry pi with the music player demon.

post #107 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asound View Post
 

This one looks pretty nice. I will try it right now.

But nevertheless I will build my self a music server, based on a raspberry pi with the music player demon.

In that case, check out Volumio

http://volumio.org/

 

RaspiFi has evolved into Volumio and is built to be an audiophile music player running on the raspberry pi.

 

And you can use the sound@home android app to control it as well:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.digx.soundhome

post #108 of 120

What's up with the NFB1-S? the info on audio-gd website looks exactly the same as the NFB-1(.32) 2014

post #109 of 120

Unfortunatelly you need to look again as it is quite different. NFB-1S was previously sell as NFB-1P in old case. This DAC is build on NFB-17 mainboard (minus WM8741 modules) + ES9018 modul taken form Compass2 project. So magical recycle. NFB-1 eiter .32 or 2014 (only case is different) is standalone complete project from A to Z. Another different which is actually important for me is 1 (2014) is built using Through-Hole Technology (THT), when 1P is built using Surface Mount Technology (SMT). Concerning further technology / electrical / electronical differences you need to ask Kingwa directly.

post #110 of 120
POST REDACTED. I just hooked this DAC up today. I'm a huge noob and I emailed Kingwa and his people about a problem I was having. I'll post back later to tell you guys what the problem was and to tell you the solution.
______

UPDATE: I have been using the NFB-1 (2014 edition with the TCXO upgrades) in combination with an NFB-6 headphone amp/preamp. In the past week and a half of testing, fiddling and listening, I've learned a few things.

I'm using the USB input, so of course I am using the driver. The driver install is easy and straightforward if you've ever installed a driver before.

The ASIO driver works well in Foobar2000 on my Windows 7 machine, with the usual ASIO caveats about Windows freaking out when other non-ASIO sounds are trying to play. Anyone buying a DAC this serious should already know.

One issue I noticed is that the NFB-1 doesn't like to be turned on and off without a little time in between. Previously, I turned it off when I left my computer and turned it back on when I came back. If I did this too often, sometimes half the left channel would disappear until I turned it off and let it sit for a while.

I emailed Kingwa about it (a few times) and he (very patiently) suggested trying different USB cables, USB ports and reinstalling the drivers. I didn't have another USB cable to try, but reinstalling the drivers and trying a different USB port didn't fix the problem. Just waiting for a while (fifteen minutes or so?) was all it took.

I've only tried up to 24-bit/192kHz files so I can't talk about DSD/DXD or other ultra-high res stuff. (Most of my library is 16/44.1 FLAC.) I also haven't tried XLR vs ACSS output because I don't have any XLR cables.

Now let me give you the most useless comparison in the history of Head-Fi! My previous system consisted of a Chaintech AV710 soundcard (an all right $20 unit with a Wolfson DAC) going to a first-gen Meier-Audio Corda Move portable amp with a 12V power supply I bought. I listen mainly with a pair of Ultrasone Pro 750s and sometimes a pair of Sennheiser HD 595s. For when speakers are necessary I use a pair of Edifier R1900T3 powered bookshelves. I don't have a lot of hi-fi experience outside of my own system though I try to be a critical listener. I'll do my best, in any case.

I won't clutter up this thread with too much NFB-6 info, however, I tested with it alone to see what difference the DAC upgrade really makes. Out of my AV710 the NFB-6 was an improvement over the Corda Move. The Ultrasones were driven with a lot more authority and ease. The real difference only came out when I installed the NFB-1. I had no idea that a lot of the breakup I noticed on my little speakers and even my headphones was due to the source. I thought it was because my portable amp couldn't handle the Ultrasones and because the Edifiers weren't very expensive.

With the NFB-1 everything is crystal clear, even if you don't need or want it to be. The Ultrasone Pro 750 is a headphone that a lot of guys complain about being a little too harsh in the treble and it also tends to be revealing of your source and file quality. It is reputed to be a little boring and monitor-like rather than rich and euphonious, or whatever. They're good for what I wanted: honesty. For me, the Ultrasone 750 and NFB-1 combo is extremely detailed and precise. It's a real pleasure with nice clean high quality files.

Soundstage is much more precise than my previous setup. It's much deeper and I can tell how "far" things are really well, though it doesn't seem much wider. Sometimes I can really hear how big the studio or venue is. Very immersive. The bass goes down extremely low. With the Ultrasones and some good electronica sometimes I swear I feel the bass in my chest. (Yes, I checked that my speakers were off.) An awesome combination for that kind of stuff. The treble, as I said, is much more detailed than anything else I've heard but it can be a bit much on some material. I'm going to keep burning stuff in and hopefully it smooths out a bit. Overall, I'm really impressed and glad I finally got a quality DAC.
Edited by McNubbins - 8/5/14 at 4:56am
post #111 of 120
Hi all, I've just received the nfb1 2014 ver.

Using usb input and coax connecting to my soundcard (onkyo se300) don't seemed to Noticable sound difference. Which looked good for my occasional gaming needs.

Comparing to the soundcard, which uses dual pcm 1798 dacs, I don't actually notice much difference in sound signature, but a bit of more separation, soundstage still sounded roughly the same (maybe due to the narrow stage of he500?)

Will give it some burn in and update my thought
post #112 of 120

Impression update: 

 

After a few days of listening to various albums, I've noticed more details in the songs previously I can't listen, and instrument separation seemed better. All in all, it's a solid upgrade compared to the Onkyo soundcard, but the difference is minor compared to other component upgrade

post #113 of 120
Welcome to the DAC world.
You need to concentrate to hear the differences (as in don't surf the net while listening). But they are there.
post #114 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemmaster View Post

Welcome to the DAC world.
You need to concentrate to hear the differences (as in don't surf the net while listening). But they are there.

Yea, and I think it's also because the onkyo card is a well implemented dual pcm 1798 product, thus upgrading to the nfb 1.32 don't give a big wow effect instantly. And the dac is just used a few days with 1-2 hrs per day usage might need some time to run in before it become optimal also
post #115 of 120

Leave it on at home playing 24/7 lol that way you need a few weeks :P

post #116 of 120

Well, listening it to improve in a course of a few weeks is a kind of fun man:gs1000smile: 

 

and it's so hot in Hong Kong now that I don't dare continuously running my gear non stop for days:veryevil:

post #117 of 120

Audio GD burns in every single piece of gear in the production process. At least 100 hours per unit.

Here is the link: http://audio-gd.com/Baby-EN.htm

post #118 of 120

This applies to the NFB series, I'd say that burn in will keep on afecting it. Though will be less notorious or not perceptible at all with the Master series that have 300 hours burn in.

post #119 of 120

Do you all hear a difference between the optical and usb input? At first I though that usb is all the way to go. Then I was unshure if there really is a difference.

My final conclusion is that the soundstage with usb is bigger, everything is a bit further away from you, which I prefer. Also with optical, the stage can be a little bit flat.

 

What do you use? Do you hear the same differences as I do?

post #120 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asound View Post
 

Do you all hear a difference between the optical and usb input? At first I though that usb is all the way to go. Then I was unshure if there really is a difference.

My final conclusion is that the soundstage with usb is bigger, everything is a bit further away from you, which I prefer. Also with optical, the stage can be a little bit flat.

 

What do you use? Do you hear the same differences as I do?

Personally I don't notice much if any difference on the HE-500 and Taurus combo. but normally when pure listening sections listening to WAV/FLACs I did use USB for optimal quality, I'd only switch to coxial using my Onkyo SE300 soundcard for serious gaming surround sound.

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