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Volume Control for Headphones on Desktop

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I am looking into recording video game footage and audio with post-production commentary but I use headphones that do not come included with in-line volume control. I currently have my Windows volume set up at 4% so that I do not kill my ears but when recording this comes out too low. I am looking to be able to have my Windows volume at a high enough level so that the audio could be heard while I am playing and recording without making me deaf.

From what I have gathered, an amp would be suited for this. I am simply looking to do this as a hobby and to get familiar with the Adobe products so I am looking at a price range between $50-$225. Exceptions will be considered but I will probably not invest in anything more than $300.

 

 

Edit: To clarify I am looking for an interface that provides independent volume controls and as mtkversion said, a mixer is probably what I'm looking for. Also added my current microphone below.

 

Hardware setup:

Audio card: ASUS Essence STX

Headphones: Audio Technica M50

Microphone: Samson C01U

Motherboard: ASUS P8P67 PRO

 

Software:

Audio recording: Adobe Audition CS6

Operating system: Windows 7 64-bit

Video recording: Fraps (I am not recording audio through this)


Edited by Ushinro - 9/7/12 at 6:30am
post #2 of 12

Is your only problem not being able to adjust Windows volume in game, or not having precise enough volume control?

 

Because you can make a script for autohotkey that will bind Windows Key + Page Up/down to change Window's volume control.

 

Just install AutoHotKey and then right click on your desktop to create new autohotkey script.

 

Paste this in there:

 

#PgUp::Send {Volume_Up 3}
#PgDn::Send {Volume_Down 3}
 
And then run it and you will be able to change volume with Windows+Page Up/Down. You can change the 3's to a lower number for more precision.
 
You can also put it in your startup folder in the start menu to be ran when windows starts.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

It's not a matter of needing to change the Windows volume setting; my keyboard can do that. I need to be able to dampen the volume to my headphones so that I can keep them on my head while still having the Windows audio loud enough for recording. I've tried the infamous Shure in-line volume control and returned it immediately.


Edited by Ushinro - 9/6/12 at 8:46am
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

(Bump)

 

I can't tell if what I'm looking for is an amp, an attenuator, or potentiometer. I guessing that it's a potentiometer since I just want to soften the sounds to me while having the Windows volume at 100.

post #5 of 12

If I understand correctly, all you want to do is mute down the signal that your PC outputs to the headphones?

Something like this should do the trick:

 

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/KOSS-IN-LINE-HEADPHONE-VOLUME-CONTROL-VC20-ALL-MP3-/390310251644?pt=US_Headphones&hash=item5ae04dcc7c

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

I have tried something like that but the quality drops significantly with the < $20 parts I've tried.

post #7 of 12

Are you sure that this is not possible just using Window's mixer? Since it's two different audio outputs there should be two different volume settings...

 

An amp would do the trick I believe... but there has to be a cheaper way while maintaining quality, you obviously don't need a second amp.

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Again, I know I can adjust the volume with the Windows volume mixer but I am trying to record audio from my computer; if I change it in the mixer, the recorded audio will be too low in volume.


Edited by Ushinro - 9/6/12 at 9:56pm
post #9 of 12

Sounds like you need a basic audio interface. Either through PCI or USB but something that has independent volume controls for recording/playback.

 

Here's one from Behringer that sounds like it should do the trick ... but you do have a higher budget so look into alternatives after reading reviews. I have no experience with the one I listed, just using it as an example.

post #10 of 12

Also don't forget to look into a standalone quality microphone.  Game replay videos can be annoying when people use their built-in mics and you hear static/pops/hissing. A quality mic can make a big difference in the overall quality for your viewers. 

 

There are tons of videos on Youtube with mic reviews so you can get a sample of what they sound like when uploaded through Youtube or similar sites.

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ushinro View Post

Again, I know I can adjust the volume with the Windows volume mixer but I am trying to record audio from my computer; if I change it in the mixer, the recorded audio will be too low in volume.

 

I mean I would check if there are two separate settings in the mixer, one for headphones, and one for the output going into the program. This should be possible using only software...

 

I've been messing around with this using audacity as a recording device and so far I've only found a way to turn the audio input into the program down... not up. So if you had the opposite problem that would help lol... I'll keep poking around to see if I can figure anything out. But I don't know how the program you are using records audio, whether it uses the wave, stereo mix, or something else from the xonar.

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

I just use the stereo mix option to record the computer audio. If I were doing live commentary I would run Audacity to record my voice along with Audition to record the computer audio.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtkversion View Post

Sounds like you need a basic audio interface. Either through PCI or USB but something that has independent volume controls for recording/playback.

 

Here's one from Behringer that sounds like it should do the trick ... but you do have a higher budget so look into alternatives after reading reviews. I have no experience with the one I listed, just using it as an example.

The Behringer mixer looks like it's what I've been looking for so I'll look into the different mixers in the market. To restate my goal, I am looking for an interface that provides independent volume control since my headphones do not.

 

I've updated the first post to list the microphone I have in case anyone is curious but this thread isn't about my mic. I can assure you that it is suitable for entry-level commentary; it is the Samson C01U. I do lack a pop-filter but I'll see different DIY tutorials since I know it's much more cost-effective that way.

 

I would say that almost everything is ready to get started except for me to finish the script and solving this issue.


Edited by Ushinro - 9/7/12 at 6:34am
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