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Why pick on cables ? - Page 23  

post #331 of 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post

Thats a good point on the cable roll off. Especially with hp's such as the HE500's that I was using. I like the treble on them, but a lot of peeps find them "hot". I can understand that being the case on certain music like classical where the dynamics are full flowing. But then again, full flowing brass is "hot". An equalizer would be able to find the sore point and calm it down more than a cable designed to roll off would, I agree.

My only concern with that theory is; Why would such a well known brand of expensive cables make one of their high end cables "roll off" treble? Make it smooth, yes. But make sure the dynamics are still there as much as poss. Peeps with high end gear (I'm not one of them) don't want cables that roll off anything. They want to hear what their expensive dac has to offer and they don't want cables to interfere with any part of it. The cable should be invisible theoretically. What I'm now hearing tonight with the VDH's is that all the dynamics are still there from top to bottom, only the very top peaks are smoothed out. I would also have to admit that the sound is less bright, or seems to be. But not in any form of dullness or compression. Just more "nice" perhaps softer at the top. But only at the very top.   

 

Most properly (and reasonably priced) cables should "sound" very similar because they are, by all practical purposes, flat in the audio frequency range. Extending the frequency range of such cables might be useful for high speed communications, but unnecessary for audio frequency range applications.

 

It is quite possible to add all sorts of load coils and stuff to a cable to behave as some odd fixed filter. This would require some extra components... and expense. Obviously this does not result in a theoretically and practically "invisible" cable.

 

Smoothing all sorts of tremble peaks with cable is a difficult task. Different headphones and gear would have tremble peaks and nulls in different frequencies, and most cables have no means to detect and fix these issues.

 

A cable that rolls off at the high frequencies effectively smooths out things in the time domain, and makes things less bright. But it takes away things that it should not smooth out also. You would definitively hear these issues.


Edited by ultrabike - 1/31/13 at 1:50pm
post #332 of 403

Thanks Ultrabike. Some food for thought :) 

 

This is not a go at none believers in cable technology. Only I believe I'm hearing a very pleasing difference between an expensive cable and a very cheap one. Theres no way I'd pay the normal price for a high end cable. Not a chance, I don't believe the difference substantiates this. But If I'm believing what I'm hearing in my modest rig, then I can sure understand why some do pay out for those very little differences.

 

beerchug.gif

post #333 of 403

Stuffing a little bit of cotton ball in your ears would smooth out the peaks about the same as using a cable that isn't efficient enough to be audibly transparent.

post #334 of 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Stuffing a little bit of cotton ball in your ears would smooth out the peaks about the same as using a cable that isn't efficient enough to be audibly transparent.

As long as it's good quality cotton.

 

I recommend Audioquest Platinum Puff.

post #335 of 403

biggrin.gif

 


Edited by LugBug1 - 1/31/13 at 2:59pm
post #336 of 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post

Thanks Ultrabike. Some food for thought :) 

 

This is not a go at none believers in cable technology. Only I believe I'm hearing a very pleasing difference between an expensive cable and a very cheap one. Theres no way I'd pay the normal price for a high end cable. Not a chance, I don't believe the difference substantiates this. But If I'm believing what I'm hearing in my modest rig, then I can sure understand why some do pay out for those very little differences.

 

beerchug.gif

 

It would be interesting to see if the cable actually is acting as a low pass filter. 

Do you have the ability to do a simple loop-back recording? Audacity and a regular soundcard with analog input would suffice.

post #337 of 403

Personally, I thonk the cable is designed to create expectation bias. "Smoother" is one of the typical descriptions of placebo sound. It's right up there with "wider soundstage" and "detailed".


Edited by bigshot - 1/31/13 at 8:26pm
post #338 of 403

And people wonder why silver cables are clear yet bright, copper cables are warm, and gold cables are lush... color, anyone? 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Personally, I thonk the cable is designed to create expectation bias. "Smoother" is one of the typical descriptions of placebo sound. It's right up there with "wider soundstage" and "detailed".

post #339 of 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by El_Doug View Post

And people wonder why silver cables are clear yet bright, copper cables are warm, and gold cables are lush... color, anyone? 

 


In one of the cable forums, someone suggested silver cables be used in the summer (because they sound cool) and copper in the winter (warm). I seriously couldn't understand whether it was a joke or not.

post #340 of 403
When I think of silver cables I think of snakes, which makes me think of slytherin, which makes me think of cold, dead, bad guys. So silver cables sound cold!
post #341 of 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post


In one of the cable forums, someone suggested silver cables be used in the summer (because they sound cool) and copper in the winter (warm). I seriously couldn't understand whether it was a joke or not.

 

Unless you live in Australia. But you also need to make sure your cables are twisted counterclockwise, or it will play your music upside down.

post #342 of 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

 

Unless you live in Australia. But you also need to make sure your cables are twisted counterclockwise, or it will play your music upside down.


Ha!

I also suggested using copper plated silver for fall, and silver plated copper for spring. Add to that the twist combinations.

post #343 of 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by limpidglitch View Post

 

It would be interesting to see if the cable actually is acting as a low pass filter. 

 

 

No mystery there. Every cable has series inductance and shunt capacitance which makes every cable a low pass filter. Though it's trivially easy to make a cable that won't roll off anything to speak of in the audio band.

 

se

post #344 of 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Eddy View Post

 

No mystery there. Every cable has series inductance and shunt capacitance which makes every cable a low pass filter. Though it's trivially easy to make a cable that won't roll off anything to speak of in the audio band.

 

se

 

Exactly, and I think it would be interesting to find out if Van den Huul succeeded at this trivial task.

post #345 of 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Eddy View Post

No mystery there. Every cable has series inductance and shunt capacitance which makes every cable a low pass filter. Though it's trivially easy to make a cable that won't roll off anything to speak of in the audio band.

se

Depending on the source impedance it could actually be difficult to make a cable that rolls off in band at all. If the source z is a few ohms you'd need well over .1uf to do anything at 20Khz without deliberately adding some R or L in series. A low Z load just makes it a little harder to do. A cable that effects an audible reaponse change would have easily measured electrical properties. There have been cables made with intentionally high series L and R and shunt C.
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