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Another Linux thread..

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Just installed some Ubuntu and was wondering what linux head-fiers are using to play their music.

post #2 of 23

Foobar runs quite nicely under wine .....

post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooko View Post

Foobar runs quite nicely under wine .....


Really? I had no idea thanks

post #4 of 23

For the Gnome desktop environment, you can try, in alphabetical order:

 

Audacious

Deadbeef

Gmusicbrowser

Guayadeque

Gmusicbrowser

Rhythmbox

 

Each media player has pluses and minuses as far as features are concerned. For bit perfect output I recommend all but Rhythmbox. Lately, I'm of the opinion that Quod Libet sounds slightly better than Gmusicbrowser with bit perfect output. I'm not really sure why this should be since they all are using gstreamer plugins for output to ALSA as far as I can tell.

 

I wouldn't recommend using the Foobar/Wine combination as it is not native to Linux and will might not give you the best possible sound output. I like Foobar in Win7 or XP, but not Linux.


Edited by Rizlaw - 8/25/12 at 12:03pm
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rizlaw View Post
I wouldn't recommend using the Foobar/Wine combination as it is not native to Linux and will not give you the best possible sound output. I like Foobar in Win7 or XP, but not Linux.

 

Using the ALSA 'plughw' devices through WINE does not affect the sound quality (although it does increase the lowest possible latency) compared to using them with a native Linux application.


Edited by stv014 - 8/25/12 at 10:39am
post #6 of 23

http://linux.voyage.hk/voyage-mpd
 

may be the hard way.. but the best as I read

I am planning to give it a try the next days

 

 

Generally MPD+Client is supposed to be better but unfortunately needs a lot of set up witch is sometimes somehow different from system to system... I tried to make it work 1-2 times but some issues occured and I didn't manage to do it yet! I used Ubuntu and Mint ...

 

My next effort will be with VoyageMPD  

 

 

 

 

I would add to the previously mentioned players Clementine!

It is bit perfect isn't it???

post #7 of 23

stv014,

 

I've never run Foobar/WINE as you briefly outlined, so I can't comment on your statement that sound quality does not suffer vs. a native Linux app. Out of curiosity, are you referring to something akin to this "howto" in the Wine Wiki: http://wiki.winehq.org/WineAndPulseaudio

If so, I think it's a lot of effort to go through to get a non-native Windows app to work in Linux. As the author cautions:

 

Quote:

Notes

To repeat, this is really quick and dirty, and it might easily break if you change other things or your distro does things differently. Experiment, and make sure you can revert to the way it used to be. Also, the Pulseaudio configuration removes a lot of flexibility with multiple soundcards, USB devices etc. Please add a better solution, if you have it

 

My point being, that there are excellent native Linux music players available which can easily be setup to use ALSA directly (i.e. Quod Libet using alsasink device=hw:0,1) and will bypass PulseAudio for bit perfect output without the potential for any breakage of your Linux OS. On the other hand, I can see and appreciate that someone who loves Foobar or J River Media Center, and can't bear to be without it in Linux, might opt to try and run them in WINE or perhaps a Windows guest Virtual Machine using Virtualbox or VMware.

 

If the OP is a Linux (Ubuntu) beginner, I think sticking with a native Linux music player is the safer and better choice.


Edited by Rizlaw - 8/25/12 at 12:02pm
post #8 of 23
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rizlaw View Post

 

I've never run Foobar/WINE as you briefly outlined, so I can't comment on your statement that sound quality does not suffer vs. a native Linux app. Out of curiosity, are you referring to something akin to this "howto" in the Wine Wiki: http://wiki.winehq.org/WineAndPulseaudio

If so, I think it's a lot of effort to go through to get a non-native Windows app to work in Linux. As the author cautions:

 

I simply removed PulseAudio from the system. But even if it was present, I do not think it would necessarily be as problematic to work around as the wiki (which may also not be up to date) suggests.

post #9 of 23

Audacious user here.

post #10 of 23

Music Player Daemon. Clients used are ncmpcpp and Sonata.

post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the feedback guys, I'm using Clementine and I rather like it a lot!

post #12 of 23

I am Ubuntu user for a very long time, I noticed that Ubuntu fails to produce as good sound as Windows, due to lack of specific audio card driver, it is very sad to me as Ubuntu fan but ...

 

You can use VLC 

 

http://www.videolan.org/vlc/index.html

 

wish you luck smily_headphones1.gif

post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lumos View Post

I am Ubuntu user for a very long time, I noticed that Ubuntu fails to produce as good sound as Windows, due to lack of specific audio card driver

 

What card/DAC do you use ?

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by stv014 View Post

 

What card/DAC do you use ?

Lumos,

 

I'd ask the same question stv014 asked.

 

I've been a near exclusive Linux (Ubuntu) user for about 5 years now (much longer if I count my very early Red Hat days), and IMHO Linux sound is equal to Win7 (WASAPI), perhaps a little better. To say Linux sound is less good than Windows sound, suggests to me that your setup might be the source of your sonic unhappiness. On the other hand, if that's how you hear it, so be it.


Edited by Rizlaw - 8/27/12 at 5:27pm
post #15 of 23

Rhythmbox here. I like the interface, and the built-in last.fm support.

 

But then again, I rarely use Linux/Ubuntu (I have it on dual-boot with Windows 7).

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