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I want to start producing trance / DnB / house, where do I start?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I've tried to do as much research on my own as I could before starting this thread because I know the thread topic is way too broad to begin approaching.

 

So here's what I have:

 

- FL Studio 10

- Roland Cakewalk A500 Pro MIDI Keyboard

- A computer (16GB of ram, i5 2500 processor--should be able to handle a billion VSTs?)

 

- Headphones: Audio Technica A900X, Sony MDR-V6, Senheisser HD555

- Speakers:  Paradigm Atoms, Paradigm Monitor 7's

 

And here's what I lack:

- Soundcard (I use integrated, thus using asio4all--is this good or bad?)

- An audio interface

- A mixer/tapedeck

 

And here's where I get really confused:

 

Is there something I'm missing?  Do I -need- an audio interface?  Do I need a mixer?  A Tape deck?  Do you recommend a drum pad?  Anything else?

 

Right now, producing with FL Studio is a tad tedious and I really dislike how asio4all doesn't support multiple audio streams (I want to have computer sounds and asio working at the same time).

 

Lastly, will FL Studio limit my growth?  Is it better to switch sooner, or should ''master'' FL Studio before moving on?

 

Thanks for any help!

post #2 of 6

Getting into audio production can be daunting, as there can be a lot more to it than it seems. I am not familiar with FL Studio, I use Pro Tools, but I am assuming you will be able to mix 'in the box' with it and won't need a dedicated mixer unless you want a more hands on feel. If you want to mix hands on you would need a mix interface that would work with your DAW. If your DAW works with asio4all you won't necessarily need a dedicated interface. An interface would give you control over your monitors and the option to record into the computer, and will probably be a lot more stable than using asio4all. I tried using asio4all with Pro Tools on a laptop just for mixing on the go, and it worked for the most part, but ended up crashing more than I would have liked. Beyond that it all depends on what exactly you are trying to do. And like Head-fi's motto "sorry about your wallet," audio production can get pretty expensive in a hurry. I have spent thousands just on software, not to mention studio equipment, mics, etc. There is a lot of cheap gear that seems tempting when you are starting out, but you will most likely end up replacing it fairly quickly, so it is often more cost effective in the long run to save up and get higher quality options.

 

A great resource for information on all things audio production are the Gearslutz.com forums. Unflattering name aside, there are a lot of guys in the business there who are good about helping out, and a huge backlog of topics like this that have been covered. Another good site is Groove3.com, they have tons of training videos that can be very helpful when starting out, though they do cost money. I would recommend getting a 1 month pass which gives you unlimited access to all the video tutorials.

post #3 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoelMC View Post

Getting into audio production can be daunting, as there can be a lot more to it than it seems. I am not familiar with FL Studio, I use Pro Tools, but I am assuming you will be able to mix 'in the box' with it and won't need a dedicated mixer unless you want a more hands on feel. If you want to mix hands on you would need a mix interface that would work with your DAW. If your DAW works with asio4all you won't necessarily need a dedicated interface. An interface would give you control over your monitors and the option to record into the computer, and will probably be a lot more stable than using asio4all. I tried using asio4all with Pro Tools on a laptop just for mixing on the go, and it worked for the most part, but ended up crashing more than I would have liked. Beyond that it all depends on what exactly you are trying to do. And like Head-fi's motto "sorry about your wallet," audio production can get pretty expensive in a hurry. I have spent thousands just on software, not to mention studio equipment, mics, etc. There is a lot of cheap gear that seems tempting when you are starting out, but you will most likely end up replacing it fairly quickly, so it is often more cost effective in the long run to save up and get higher quality options.

 

A great resource for information on all things audio production are the Gearslutz.com forums. Unflattering name aside, there are a lot of guys in the business there who are good about helping out, and a huge backlog of topics like this that have been covered. Another good site is Groove3.com, they have tons of training videos that can be very helpful when starting out, though they do cost money. I would recommend getting a 1 month pass which gives you unlimited access to all the video tutorials.

^^^ So true. 

 

What you actually need to do is just produce. You have the essential gear (headphones, speakers, computer, DAW)

On the condition that your computer doesn't freeze everytime you run FL the only thing seperating you from Camo & Krooked or Maya Jane Coles is practice. As long as you can hear it your well on your way.

post #4 of 6

FL is OK to learn on, but I would suggest Ableton Live or Logic. Either of those two programs will help you bring out your creative potential much faster. Obviously there is a bit steeper learning curve, but they have much more to offer. I prefer Ableton because it has much more versatility that can translate into the live arena , whereas Logic is better for laying out compositions in the studio.

 

I am also just starting to make Trance and Dnb.It took about 6 months of trial and error before I completed my first track. I now have about 8. Its tough to start but you gotta keep trying to get better. Here is my first tracks that I have made:

 

http://soundcloud.com/futuresightproductions

 

Let me know what you think


Edited by Ksef10 - 9/7/12 at 7:55am
post #5 of 6

You have everything you need! FL Studio is a great program and the next version will have a live feature much like Ableton's for playing your tracks out.

 

I wouldn't advize looking into another DAW until you really have FL down. I spent so much time and money trying different DAW's, From Reason, to Ableton, to Studio One, to FL Studio. I settled on FL because I wasn't making music, I was just moving between DAW's. No DAW is perfect, and ultimately you have to think of them as tools to creating music. The most important part is that you create, not features from one or another. I've grown to love FL, many people do.

Check out www.warbeats.com for a lot of great tutorials, covering everything from FL Studio functions, to making money from your music, to learning music theory (important)

Also, the books Do The Work and The War of Art by Steven Pressfield has been a HUGE help for me.

jump in the deep end and don't be afraid to break into different genre's or make things that sound bad. Every great piece of art sucked at one point in it's conception, don't worry about it. Keep working.

post #6 of 6

http://www.virtualdj.com/download/free.html have a mess about with these..p.s get the pioneer we go or some cheap decks!


Edited by our martin - 9/7/12 at 4:38am
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