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AD700 good to be used as a gaming headset?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I can get these for 75$ used, and have heard that they are great for gaming. That is what I will be using them for almost 100% of the time. I have my Sennheiser HD439 to listen to music with. If I get them i will probably put a mic on them. So only reason I am posting is just to ask what are some pros and cons of the headphones? (for gaming not music) Thanks in advance!

post #2 of 15

Their biggest asset for gaming I feel isn't even their very open sound, but their extreme comfort.  It makes long-term gaming sessions very natural.

 

Rather you're gaming on a pc or console, I'd get a dolby headphone processor with them.  Their very large soundstage isn't realized until DH.  Dolby Headphone brutally demonstrates a headphone's soundstage depth.

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

Dolby headphone processor? Whats that?

post #4 of 15

Like the Turtle Beach DSS, Astro Mixamp, or any soundcard on a computer that has it.

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

Ok.

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kosmik Panda View Post

I can get these for 75$ used, and have heard that they are great for gaming. That is what I will be using them for almost 100% of the time. I have my Sennheiser HD439 to listen to music with. If I get them i will probably put a mic on them. So only reason I am posting is just to ask what are some pros and cons of the headphones? (for gaming not music) Thanks in advance!

 

Heya,

 

They're probably one of the most over-hyped headphones on the internet tied with the word "gaming". Take this as merely my opinion as someone who's tried 40+ headphones, and plays games. Not someone who just regurgitates what they've read and spams "M50, AD700" to everyone for every single request.

 

PROs:

 

Spacious sound stage. It's open, wide, great separation.

Soft material that touches your skin (note: for some, it's itchy).

Fits big heads, because they're huge cups and the band is very loose, so it's great for massive noggins.

It has a long cable, so it can reach behind your box or to whatever you're plugging it into. The cable is also decent quality, it's not a flimsy little cord. It will survive a couple of poorly thought out tugs.

Low impedance, high sensitivity, which translates to an efficiency. In other words, it runs off anything. You won't need special "amplifiers" to make it be dynamic.

Sound is decent, it has good mids and treble, clear sound, airy even, but not too bright to the point of pain, and not too dim to the point of overly smoothing out detail.

 

CONs:

 

It doesn't fit so great on smaller heads. You'll have to bend the band to make it snuggly hold your head unless you have a massive head.

The cups are huge, so it may not touch your head with all the cup, which can be annoying when you want to properly position the driver to your ear.

You can't change the pads, so I hope you like AT's version of velour. For some, it's itchy. For others, it's fine.

Sound quality is merely decent, not superb. As for frequency, it really lacks bass (sub bass). This is a good thing for "online competitive directional foot step listening" but it's pretty awful for immersion and plain having fun.

Usually runs $100, which is expensive for what you get. You're paying for 2/3rd of the frequency response potential of a typical headphone, when you could just get a fully response headphone and EQ the bass away if you really want no bass.

It's one of those over-hyped headphones that for some unfortunate reason has been reduced to being the "gamer's headphone" king of recommendations, which is so, so, very misleading.

There's $50 headphones that do the same thing as the AD700. But they aren't over-hyped and hyper-recommended. So naturally, are unheard of by most new to the wide world of headphones.

 

If you'd like further review, please see the link in my signature for the AD700. Complete with photos.

 

I actually do not recommend the AD700. Take any decent headphone and equalize the bass down, and you can mimic the same thing for less money. It would be one thing if the headphone was actually neutral and capable of producing bass, but it's not, it's not neutral, it's a headphone with more volume in the mids & treble, and less volume in the bass. Equalizing this up does not have the same effect as having a headphone that is already quite capable of producing bass. So why get a factory crippled headphone?

 

Basically I'm trying to save your money, since this is for gaming and not for actual enjoyment of audio. But then again, I've gamed with my HE-500's. Kind of a weird world.

 

Very best,

post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thank you Malveaux, so if not the AD700, then what would be a good gaming headphone? Because I would like to use something else rather than my HD439 (even though they sound awesome with gaming I dont want to put a mic on them) I would need them to be kind of cheap like ~60$. I plan to put a modmic on them.

Note: Using them for my xbox, not pc.

post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kosmik Panda View Post

Thank you Malveaux, so if not the AD700, then what would be a good gaming headphone? Because I would like to use something else rather than my HD439 (even though they sound awesome with gaming I dont want to put a mic on them) I would need them to be kind of cheap like ~60$. I plan to put a modmic on them.

Note: Using them for my xbox, not pc.

 

Heya,

 

A humble $48 SR850.

 

(Note, you can even put K240 velour pads on it if you wanted to change the feel later)

 

Very best,

post #9 of 15

The one thing the AD700 has going for it, is that it has a HUGE soundstage.

I think it's fairly clear and well detailed (not just due to extra treble and less bass).

I find it's mids really too lean and it's too treble happy. Yet the Q701s treble doesn't bother me at all.

 

Are there any headphones (for gaming only) that have a soundstage like the AD700 for under $100? Not many.

I have the AD700, but it's one I almost never use.

 

I don't suggest the AD700 unless it's for very competitive gaming and you absolutely MUST stay under $100.

Another good one is the AKG K240 Studio. It's semi-open and can be had as an open box deal for around $75.

 

One headphone that's better than the AD700 IMO is the AD300.

It's not as clear, but has fuller mids, more bass and less treble. It's soundstage is smaller than the AD700 and it's also better for small heads.

I got mine at Wal-Mart(!) for $35, but it's normally a $75 headphone.

 

Not sure how it compares to the AD500, but the AD300's signature I really like.

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMRaven View Post

Like the Turtle Beach DSS, Astro Mixamp, or any soundcard on a computer that has it.

Okay, since I'm going to be getting the AD300 or AD700, not only do they have great soundstage, in order to get the best out of their great soundstage I must get a headphone amp?  Good thing I past by this thread because I thought just plugging it straight into my computer would have been good enough.  You mention though that I can choose between a Turtle beach dss, astro mixamp, or computer soundcard.  

 

I was looking at specs of the Turtle beach and I only see that it has Dolby Digital headphone processing but doesn't mention 5.1 or 7.1

 

The Astro Mixamp clearly states 7.1 dolby digital headphone surround.

 

Lastly, I looked at various sound cards namely of the Asus Xonar line (DG, DGX), and saw specs of Dolby Digital headphone 5.1

 

I thought the sound card would be the best option for me because I don't want extra peripherals hanging out and around my desk, but from reading the features since the astro mixamp has 7.1 is that the best one to get?  Or will the Xonar be fine with 5.1.  I do want to mention it is important for me to have the best possible sound stage for fps gaming (CS: GO).

 

Any help would be appreciated total sound noob.

post #11 of 15

Mixamp and DSS only do 5.1, if there's any 7.1 processing it's artificial.  They use optical, which only carries 5.1.  HDMI carries 7.1.

 

Either way if your soundcard has dolby headphone, you're fine with it.

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by duranzo View Post

Okay, since I'm going to be getting the AD300 or AD700, not only do they have great soundstage, in order to get the best out of their great soundstage I must get a headphone amp?  Good thing I past by this thread because I thought just plugging it straight into my computer would have been good enough.  You mention though that I can choose between a Turtle beach dss, astro mixamp, or computer soundcard.  

 

I was looking at specs of the Turtle beach and I only see that it has Dolby Digital headphone processing but doesn't mention 5.1 or 7.1

 

The Astro Mixamp clearly states 7.1 dolby digital headphone surround.

 

Lastly, I looked at various sound cards namely of the Asus Xonar line (DG, DGX), and saw specs of Dolby Digital headphone 5.1

 

I thought the sound card would be the best option for me because I don't want extra peripherals hanging out and around my desk, but from reading the features since the astro mixamp has 7.1 is that the best one to get?  Or will the Xonar be fine with 5.1.  I do want to mention it is important for me to have the best possible sound stage for fps gaming (CS: GO).

 

Any help would be appreciated total sound noob.

 

The Mixamp is a CONSOLE GAMING device. For PC gaming, a sound card provides more features and more quality at less cost.

 

Those headphones are so sensitive that you don't need to worry about having a dedicated headphone amp. Just about any source will do.

 

If anything, the Mixamp's limited to Dolby Headphone 5.1 because of S/PDIF bandwidth limitations, while a sound card can give it the full 7.1 mix because PCI/PCIe interfaces aren't bandwidth-constrained like that. Not that I'd expect a dramatic difference with the extra side channels; the important thing is that you can distinguish front and rear.

 

CS:GO, huh? I'm half-tempted to recommend a refurb X-Fi Titanium off Newegg for $50, but since I don't have that iteration of CS to test, I can't be as certain about the snd_legacy_surround 1 + ALchemy trick for the best sound positioning that works in most other Source engine games (CS:S included).

post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by NamelessPFG View Post

 

The Mixamp is a CONSOLE GAMING device. For PC gaming, a sound card provides more features and more quality at less cost.

 

Those headphones are so sensitive that you don't need to worry about having a dedicated headphone amp. Just about any source will do.

 

If anything, the Mixamp's limited to Dolby Headphone 5.1 because of S/PDIF bandwidth limitations, while a sound card can give it the full 7.1 mix because PCI/PCIe interfaces aren't bandwidth-constrained like that. Not that I'd expect a dramatic difference with the extra side channels; the important thing is that you can distinguish front and rear.

 

CS:GO, huh? I'm half-tempted to recommend a refurb X-Fi Titanium off Newegg for $50, but since I don't have that iteration of CS to test, I can't be as certain about the snd_legacy_surround 1 + ALchemy trick for the best sound positioning that works in most other Source engine games (CS:S included).

 

 

Laugh, I'm so out of tune with CS, I stopped playing in 2003, skipped source entirely.  Been playing SC2 for the last couple years, and since none of my friends played SC2 with me, the aspect of friend gaming again enticed me to try CS:GO with my buddies, and so I'm looking for a very fine tuned setup.  Got my Mech Keyboard, comfortable mouse, new comp build, last thing to go is getting the audio just right, as I recall from CS using headphones gave me such a huge advantage back then, and not many people even used it while I was playing.  So now, if I could get some help getting a good setup, I'll be quite happy.

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16829132052 (DGX)

This is what I was looking at, do you think this will be fine for my needs?

 

Oh yea, and the AD300 or AD700 will be a fine pair for CS: GO?


Edited by duranzo - 9/2/12 at 2:23pm
post #14 of 15
The sound stage of the AD700 is awesome, more impressively is the feeling of these headphones on your head for 8, 8, 12hr gaming sessions (I have a big head fyi). They do NOT get hot and your head does not feel like it was in a vice when you take them off. Very airy.

I have an ASUS Xonar DX sound card that support Dolby Headphone. Zero complaints with this combo. You will be picking up sounds other players can't. For the ones they can hear, you will be hearing them first.

The sound quality is sharp. These are not bass head headphones, but they are enough for gaming IMO. Explosions still pop.

I fully recommend these "competitive" and "comfortable" headphones over any $50-200 alternative.
post #15 of 15

Actually they might not been hot for your head and fit good on you, but another person it will be the opposite, I know it was for me. The headphone made my head hot and i couldn't use the AD700s that long because of it. As I felt like My head was in a spa room. Besides moving around when I made subtle movements made the headphones move off the top of my head. But like I said Results will be different based on the person head. As he will be getting thinking he will have the same results as you then realize that he doesn't and will not be happy with them.

 

The best thing he can do is go some where that let him use it first so he knows how it feels on his head. Because only he will know.


Edited by genclaymore - 9/9/12 at 1:49pm
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