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Vinyl weights-140/180/200 grams?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I assume the heavier the more stable (?) (and more expensive)?
How significant is the difference in quality? And is a high quality table required to appreciate the difference? Also what was the weight of the old standard non-audiophile LP's of the past, now in used vinyl shops? Just wondering .
post #2 of 10

I like the 180s

I think the difference is noticeable. So much that for albums I really like, I find myself holding back buying $7 - $15 used 140G records, to try and find often $20+ 180G. Back to CD level prices.

I have not tried 200G. They cost even more and guessing would require me to adjust VTA too. While in theory the 180Gs should too, a little closer, and feel can get by with same VTA. Er maybe my VTA is just right for 180s and to low for the 140s. Since records are often slightly warped this throws things off as well.

Another guess, is that labels that put forth this consideration also generally do so in other areas, ensuring a better pressing.

While not hi-end feel I have a moderate setup w/ Roksan Radius V+Kontrapunct A.
post #3 of 10
I've got a few LP's where I have duplicate copies (standard pressing and 180g or 200g). The difference is remarkable. I don't think the main difference is due to the vinyl thickness though. Heavier vinyl might be more stable and less prone to warpage, but the are pressed with higher quality machines and often recorded from original masters. The differences you'll hear are much quieter background, and more detailed sound with better dynamics. Take it a step further and consider a 45rpm pressing. They generally run $50 a copy but the sound is stunning. You'll easily be able to hear the difference on even a modest TT setup.
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks tk_suki & kentamcolin thats pretty clear . Now im just curious about the old used vinyl out there, 140 gram?
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally posted by kentamcolin
I've got a few LP's where I have duplicate copies (standard pressing and 180g or 200g). The difference is remarkable. I don't think the main difference is due to the vinyl thickness though. Heavier vinyl might be more stable and less prone to warpage, but the are pressed with higher quality machines and often recorded from original masters. The differences you'll hear are much quieter background, and more detailed sound with better dynamics. Take it a step further and consider a 45rpm pressing. They generally run $50 a copy but the sound is stunning. You'll easily be able to hear the difference on even a modest TT setup.

I agree.

I have some very old records that must be about 180gr. None of these have any warpage. But I don't think they sound any better just because of the weight.
The weight/thickness could have some physical effects, but these will be highly dependent on how the record is being clamped, etc..
The chemical quality of the vinyl itself is important, and recent audiophile LPs presumably use high quality vinyl.
post #6 of 10
sonics vary record to record. including on 180 and 200 gm and even the 45 rpm 'pressed on one side only' 12"ers.

sometimes a new heavy pressing will beat an old pressing(classic records new mastering of led zep blows away every old copy i can find). but having bought 100's of titles of both, and 'a/b'ing them; in most cases a FIRST or EARLY pressing will smoke the new guys. but when yer just grabbing any old copies in stores + tag sales its a crap shoot.

the thing is: finding early pressings can be tough, and when you do the cost can be simply crasy.

if you start to buy vinyl and are seeking the best sound you can get, you'll end up with a mix, i would bet
post #7 of 10

45rpm pressings - nice

I agree kind of a crap-shot. Looks like I got lucky yesterday. Picked up Peter Gabriels I dont remember. Turns out a 45RPM. Sounds much better than expected, er after I noticed it was a 45rpm and adjusted speed. Cost just under $3.00s. In pretty good shape. Except the cover which is super flimsy/beatup(reason was not expecting much. BTW there was no marking to suggest was a 45RPM or any other kind of pressing.
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks again daycart1, mrPeabody, tk_suki. I feel fate bound towards vinyl, which is unexpected but irresistable.
post #9 of 10
THen there is......shudder..... the abomination of RCA Dynaflex....
post #10 of 10

just joined this forum after reading up on all the problems with those Zeppelin 200 gram albums

 

i've been collecting 180 gram albums for a few years now, and i have only ran into a couple problems really. but the one thing that really, REALLY just makes me pull my hair out, is a really bad pressing. i should've known better when i saw the first Mr Bungle album on Plain Recordings in 180 gram vinyl. that was a total waste of money. and i shouldve just realized it right from the start and walked away from it. what is really upsetting is that i would classify this under the "WE WANT MONEY" kinda pressings. they didn't bother to think about the length of the album vs how squished the grooves would be. i believe the cd length is around 60-65 minutes ? (it's been awhile since i've owned it) but there aint no way, no matter, no how, they should've even call this a 180 gram pressing. the sound level is so low and quiet that i would call this the worse 180 gram album ever. i even tried testing it thru the VU levels of my tape recorder. and even cranked up to 10, it's no where near hitting the red at all. which i could not believe.....which leads me to this problem

 

Nirvana - Bleach (double album 20th anniversary reissue on 180 gram white vinyl)

i was totally hyped up when i saw this, well. for not dirt ass cheap, but i thought $35 seemed worth it considering it felt like the entire package weighed up way heavy, heavy duty packaging and whatnots. and then after the 2.5 hour ride back home thinking about how cool this gonna sound at such a loud volume on my stereo, just to find out that it skipped on track 1 side 1 at least 10 times within the first 20 seconds of the song, and then kept doing it here and there. and sure enough. the first song was the only one that did it. so wtf? here i am stuck with an album i didn't end up buying locally where it'd be no problem to take back, but do i really want to go back to the store i bought it at. spend all that gas money. no. i ended up giving it away to a friend and warned him about it. he said he didn't care. which, okay. fine. but still. what's with this thing about just the first song skipping (which i also read alot about from RTI pressed albums)
 

i wonder if it's coming from the people who are handle the albums when they get packaged. i recentally saw a DOORS ANALOGUE PRODUCTION 45RPM video on youtube, and as much as i'm all for pristine packaging and all that. i couldn't believe that when they were hand folding the gatefold covers, that they were not wearing gloves. they do when they handle the records themselves. so, could it also be from incorrect handeling?

 

anyways,  on the other hand, i'm so glad i didn't pick up any 200 gram Alan Parsons Project albums after reading about all this QA problems with 200 gram albums. i'm not saying i would never own one, but i think i would have better luck with a used copy of it in mint shape.

 

i now only buy 180 gram albums. i got a buddy who's on the up and up with a distributor here in canada, and i will only get 180 gram albums from. he actually gets release sheets emailed to him, and then he forwards them to me. which is nice, because i can scope out the 180 gram albums that i would want, as opposed to just blowing $200 on ones in a record store. i now have come down to this personal fact that i will only buy 180's if the album warrants owning it in that format. like the recent Ziggy Stardust album, or Ministry's Psalm 69.

 

i still buy "standard" weight albums, like the last 2 Guided By Voices albums and they seem to sound fine.

as much as i like colored vinyl. i find that white albums are a 50/50 thing. white as i've learned is the softest vinyl out there and i would deam that buyer beware, which made me very cautious about the new HEAVY BLANKET album that ran me almost $50 (but limited to 1000 copies)

 

and yes, i still buy used crappy thirft store vinyl, but dont go ape**** doing it like i used to 20 years ago

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