Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › Tralucent Audio 1Plus2 IEM Appreciation/Impressions Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tralucent Audio 1Plus2 IEM Appreciation/Impressions Thread - Page 89

post #1321 of 5392
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post


I understand your point AnakChan and my point still stands. Listening at those volumes is indeed above 85dB. 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

If you got an iphone or maybe even android device give "etymotic awareness" program (free) a whirl. It'll tell you what you need to know. I just tested it out on my iphone and indeed at 40 volume it is hitting around 100 dB on the 1Plus2! Slightly under it. Raise it up to 45 volume and it's going over 100 dB! (RWA AK100 and Tralucent 1plus2 IEMS). At around 31 it is still around 85 dB sometimes goes over it. But settles around 81 dB average. Still 31 is a bit loud for me but I'd be able to listen to it comfortably for a little while anyways. Listening at around 27 which would be my ideal listening level in terms of louder listening volumes, maxes out depending on track around 85dB but stay generally around 75 to 80 dB. Listening at 21.5 (which is my ideal general listening volume) stays around 70dB average and goes under that.

 

Listening to the Studio V on volume 6 averages around 75dB and spikes at times to 85 db. I generally listen at volume 5 on the Studio V which is slightly less. My point is listening at such levels (that is 85 and above) will damage your hearing in the long run if the damage hasn't been done already.... I found the information out from Planx :). Gotta love Planx :P.

 

If you have an iPhone, download the free app Awareness! from Etymotic. You can easily measure your dB by placing the IEM on the mic on the iPhone. I can say it's pretty accurate and my volume ranges from 80-85dB. 90 at most when the song gets a bit chaotic in terms of heavy rock or bass.

 

 

 

 

You could be right but that isn't the debate. No one is questioning if 85dB is acceptable or not. Sitting on the sidelines, you're talking about apples and Toad's talking about oranges.

post #1322 of 5392
Thread Starter 

.


Edited by lee730 - 1/19/13 at 2:47am
post #1323 of 5392

Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post


AnakChan toads said that 40 volume on the RWA AK100 is not above 85dB. I say otherwise and taking it even higher goes well above 90+dB. That is my point and I've proved it with this program. Give it a try yourself and find out. It costs nothing. It's much better to have awareness of what volume you are listening to anyways for safety reasons alone.

 
I'm taking this offline with you on PM.
post #1324 of 5392

ph34r.gif popcorn.gif

post #1325 of 5392
Really...?!?

How is jamming an IEM up against a smartphone mic anything but at best an informal, rough estimation of sound energy at the nozzle end...this in no way represents volume at the tympanic membrane...
post #1326 of 5392
Ha, ha. That app is pretty funny. I can hum decently loud and it says 90db, then with the iPhone volume maxed out with the gr07 causes interference and at 85% volume says 80db. Looks like I better not hum around people for too long.
post #1327 of 5392
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shotgunshane View Post

Ha, ha. That app is pretty funny. I can hum decently loud and it says 90db, then with the iPhone volume maxed out with the gr07 causes interference and at 85% volume says 80db. Looks like I better not hum around people for too long.

 

How-To's

Decibel (Loudness) Comparison Chart

Here are some interesting numbers, collected from a variety of sources, that help one to understand the volume levels of various sources and how they can affect our hearing.

Environmental Noise

Weakest sound heard 0dB
Whisper Quiet Library at 6' 30dB
Normal conversation at 3' 60-65dB
Telephone dial tone 80dB
City Traffic (inside car) 85dB
Train whistle at 500', Truck Traffic 90dB
Jackhammer at 50' 95dB
Subway train at 200' 95dB
Level at which sustained exposure may result in hearing loss 90 - 95dB
Hand Drill 98dB
Power mower at 3' 107dB
Snowmobile, Motorcycle 100dB
Power saw at 3' 110dB
Sandblasting, Loud Rock Concert 115dB
Pain begins 125dB
Pneumatic riveter at 4' 125dB
Even short term exposure can cause permanent damage - Loudest recommended exposure WITH hearing protection 140dB
Jet engine at 100' 140dB
12 Gauge Shotgun Blast 165dB
Death of hearing tissue 180dB
Loudest sound possible 194dB

 

 

http://www.gcaudio.com/resources/howtos/loudness.html

 

 

post #4690 of 4760
Question for you GR07 peeps. I got these this week and, so far, really like them. Sound great and getting better as I get more and more burn-in hours on them. However, the seem pretty inefficient to me and require me to crank my Clip Zip and/or Galaxy S3 near max output levels just to get to a solid but non-ear-shattering listening volume.This is a concern because amps typically are not at their best when pushed to thei limits. Upon investigation, I did discover that the GR07's do indeed have low sensitivity rating of 105db, which would explain why I'm having to crank my source volume so high. For comparison, SM3's are rated at 122db, a whopping 17db difference in sensitivity. So the question is, do any of you experience this same issue? Are you cranking your source to 90% or more to get to good listening levels? I read a lot about these IEMs before buying and never heard this complaint. Am I alone?

Current IEM: SE530
Former IEM's: Triple.Fi 10, Super.Fi 5vi, S4i, HF2
Current Source Gear: iPhone 3G 8GB, Sansa Clip+ 8GB
ReplyQuote Multi 
post #4691 of 4760
I've said it before, personally I don't think a Clip+ / Zip powers GR07 sufficiently. Sure sound comes out and they sound OK, but nothing like what a source such as Cowons C2 will achieve, people debated with me that the maths all worked out and a Clip+ can drive them just fine. I still say no, because I've heard the difference, you can obtain much better results with more power and you're limiting their potential without it.
Edited by H20Fidelity - 1/11/13 at 4:12pm

Conclusion: Colorfly CK4 + C&C BH Portable Amp + T-Peos H-100KG Hybrid  ლ(ಠ益ಠლ) 
 

ReplyQuote Multi 
post #4692 of 4760
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teeter View Post

Question for you GR07 peeps. I got these this week and, so far, really like them. Sound great and getting better as I get more and more burn-in hours on them. However, the seem pretty inefficient to me and require me to crank my Clip Zip and/or Galaxy S3 near max output levels just to get to a solid but non-ear-shattering listening volume.This is a concern because amps typically are not at their best when pushed to thei limits. Upon investigation, I did discover that the GR07's do indeed have low sensitivity rating of 105db, which would explain why I'm having to crank my source volume so high. For comparison, SM3's are rated at 122db, a whopping 17db difference in sensitivity. So the question is, do any of you experience this same issue? Are you cranking your source to 90% or more to get to good listening levels? I read a lot about these IEMs before buying and never heard this complaint. Am I alone?

 

If you want higher volumes, then yeah you'll need to turn your player up a bit.

REVIEWS:
Sony XBA-3 & Etymotic HF-3
Vsonic GR07 MKII vs Final Audio Design FI-BA-SS
Aurisonics ASG-1
Vsonic GR07

Signing up for Amazon Prime ranks as one of the smartest things I've ever done
ReplyQuote Multi 
post #4693 of 4760
Something as small as an E6 amp with your galaxy may make a big difference.
post #4694 of 4760
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teeter View Post

Question for you GR07 peeps. I got these this week and, so far, really like them. Sound great and getting better as I get more and more burn-in hours on them. However, the seem pretty inefficient to me and require me to crank my Clip Zip and/or Galaxy S3 near max output levels just to get to a solid but non-ear-shattering listening volume.This is a concern because amps typically are not at their best when pushed to thei limits. Upon investigation, I did discover that the GR07's do indeed have low sensitivity rating of 105db, which would explain why I'm having to crank my source volume so high. For comparison, SM3's are rated at 122db, a whopping 17db difference in sensitivity. So the question is, do any of you experience this same issue? Are you cranking your source to 90% or more to get to good listening levels? I read a lot about these IEMs before buying and never heard this complaint. Am I alone?

 

I've got the clip zip also and just got the gr07 today. I would have a similar opinion. I do need to crank the volume a good bit to get to a comfortable listening level. And I'm more of a soft to medium level listener. I've got a e07k/ipod classic that I'm gonna try after these have cooked for a while. It will be interesting to see what kind of difference the amp and ipod make. 

 

Also, the only other quality iem that I've owned and can use for comparison is the ie80. The Senn is a good iem but sounded quite bassy compared to the gr07. The vsonic sounds expertly balanced and reproduces a "layered" sound with great instrument and vocals. Honestly, based on my memory I'd say that the vsonic sounds more expensive and more musical than the ie80. Plus the fit was essentially automatic for me...an experience that I've never come close to having with any iem until now. Really enjoying these. biggrin.gif

 

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/552132/vsonic-gr07-impressions-appreciation-thread/4680


Edited by lee730 - 1/19/13 at 7:36am
post #1328 of 5392

Well, glad to see people are enjoying 1Plus2. Of course, like Anakchan said: different people, different taste. 

post #1329 of 5392

Lee i'm not sure what you're agenda is here...if you want to listen to your $2000+ setup at a whisper, by all means...but i think it rather ridiculous for you to post that listening at levels anything louder than you do is dangerous and causing damage to users hearing...essentially based on some inaccurate program and referencing a chart that employs vague, ill defined terms 

 

I myself have listened to IEMs and headphones for over 30 years on moderate volumes for a couple of hours at a time (albeit, i'm rarely plugged in for more than 2hrs) with no ill effects ....

 

i'm not implying people don't need to be mindful of their volumes and practice safe listening...

 

FYI: from numerous sources 91db is acceptable for ~2hr/day, 94db for ~1hr/day...

post #1330 of 5392
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by toads View Post

Lee i'm not sure what you're agenda is here...if you want to listen to your $2000+ setup at a whisper, by all means...but i think it rather ridiculous for you to post that listening at levels anything louder than you do is dangerous and causing damage to users hearing...essentially based on some inaccurate program and referencing a chart that employs vague, ill defined terms 

 

I myself have listened to IEMs and headphones for over 30 years on moderate volumes for a couple of hours at a time (albeit, i'm rarely plugged in for more than 2hrs) with no ill effects ....

 

i'm not implying people don't need to be mindful of their volumes and practice safe listening...

 

FYI: from numerous sources 91db is acceptable for ~2hr/day, 94db for ~1hr/day...


lol I don't listen to my set up at a "whisper" ;). I listen to them around 70 to 85dB generally. I agree with you though on short listening sessions at louder volumes as not being majorly detrimental to ones hearing. But on longer sessions you can count on it. My point is while that program may not be perfect I think it is giving a decent figure of the noise levels in the vicinity. Even with it being quiet and just a fan running, it was showing around 30 dB of noise constant.

 

What I am mainly getting at is being mindful of volume listening to preserve ones hearing. Of course it will really come down to our own choices since it is our ears. But it's good to have the information out there since this is a very big problem across the board & noise pollution being the overall bigger issue at hand. Still it's quite shocking that normal conversation isn't too far away from the limit and it's quite easy to get past that limit without being conscious of it. Even UElover noted how easy it is to listen to the RWA AK100 at dangerous level and indeed he is correct. Anyways I'm trying to find out exactly what the AK100s power rating is which I can't seem to find anywhere. I could do this all mathematically with the figures if that would make you feel better about it. wink_face.gif


Edited by lee730 - 1/19/13 at 8:57am
post #1331 of 5392
I'm not sure what quoting several different people on the gr07 thread was about. Yes they are less efficient, therefore you have turn it up to get similar volume of other more effecient earphones. My point is at arms length it said my hum was louder than nearly topped out gr07 on the iPhone, which clearly isn't the case.

Edit: looks like the Etymotic app is approximately +10db off from the other 2 dedicated noise level measuring apps I have on my iPhone.
Edited by shotgunshane - 1/19/13 at 9:55am
post #1332 of 5392

Lee730 = king of ninja edit  smile.gif

post #1333 of 5392

Holy Luao!!  I listen to my Studio V at 8, no wonder I can't hear/understand what Lee730 is saying about how he loves FOTMs???!!LOL!.   Funny I see this topic today, I was having lunch yesterday in a noisy restaurant and had a hard time hearing my mom and we discussed hearing damage from earphones!!LOL!!!   So I went home and took the following

tests(below), one of which I that I can't find said I needed to get my hearing checked!   The Siemens and Phonak tests said my ears were fine for my age, and the Univ of S.Wales test was the most interesting, when it went above 6khz I really couldn't hear much, it seemed anything over 12khz  I couldn't hear at all!!!

Maybe I do need testing by my audiologist.   Jaddie posted the following which I like:

 

Here it is: normal speech at conversation distance in a room with average to low background noise ends up at 65 - 70dB SPL. If you set your music level, then take the cans off and listen to a someone talk, you'll have a rough reference. A +10dB change is perceived as a doubling in volume, and a -10dB change, cutting volume in half. If your music sounds twice as loud as conversation, you're running 75 - 80dB SPL, which is still safe for fairly long periods. Peaks in music will go higher, and that's still safe, as long as they are momentary.  You may need to compare speech and your music several times to get a good feel for it. Take your time.

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/638243/question-about-volume-and-possible-hearing-damage

http://hearing.siemens.com/Global/en/services/hearing-test/hearing-test.html

http://www.phonak.com/com/b2c/en/hearing/recognizing_hearingloss/online-hearing-test.html

http://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/jw/hearing.html

post #1334 of 5392
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by soundbear View Post

Holy Luao!!  I listen to my Studio V at 8, no wonder I can't hear/understand what Lee730 is saying about how he loves FOTMs???!!LOL!.   Funny I see this topic today, I was having lunch yesterday in a noisy restaurant and had a hard time hearing my mom and we discussed hearing damage from earphones!!LOL!!!   So I went home and took the following

tests(below), one of which I that I can't find said I needed to get my hearing checked!   The Siemens and Phonak tests said my ears were fine for my age, and the Univ of S.Wales test was the most interesting, when it went above 6khz I really couldn't hear much, it seemed anything over 12khz  I couldn't hear at all!!!

Maybe I do need testing by my audiologist.   Jaddie posted the following which I like:

 

Here it is: normal speech at conversation distance in a room with average to low background noise ends up at 65 - 70dB SPL. If you set your music level, then take the cans off and listen to a someone talk, you'll have a rough reference. A +10dB change is perceived as a doubling in volume, and a -10dB change, cutting volume in half. If your music sounds twice as loud as conversation, you're running 75 - 80dB SPL, which is still safe for fairly long periods. Peaks in music will go higher, and that's still safe, as long as they are momentary.  You may need to compare speech and your music several times to get a good feel for it. Take your time.

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/638243/question-about-volume-and-possible-hearing-damage

http://hearing.siemens.com/Global/en/services/hearing-test/hearing-test.html

http://www.phonak.com/com/b2c/en/hearing/recognizing_hearingloss/online-hearing-test.html

http://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/jw/hearing.html

 

So you listen at volume 8 generally on your second generation Studio V? Seems about right to me. The newer unit is more powerful. I use to listen around 8 to 9 on the older unit. I get the same volume around 5 to 6 now on the 3rd ANV.


Edited by lee730 - 1/19/13 at 3:14pm
post #1335 of 5392

I really despise descriptions of noise levels because it's all relative and there is no reference point when you say "city traffic" or "truck traffic." 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › Tralucent Audio 1Plus2 IEM Appreciation/Impressions Thread