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Budget quality headphones - Page 2

post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 

Ooh, before I go, could I ask a final question.

The main difference, if any, between Studio and DJ Headphones (Headphone Noob)

post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by binman13 View Post

Ooh, before I go, could I ask a final question.

The main difference, if any, between Studio and DJ Headphones (Headphone Noob)

Marketing Gimmick A vs Marketing Gimmick B!

DJ Headphones tend to be closed and have a slightly boosted bass response. Some follow this stereotype, others don't.

Studio Headphones tend to be more neutral and can be open, closed, or semi open. Again, this isn't always the case.

I wouldn't put too much weight into something being called a studio headphone or a DJ headphone.

Many good headphones don't advertise themselves as either, and are used by plenty of DJs and in plenty of studios.

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbamg View Post

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16826106373

Are these the R/80s?

Yes. The packaging looks different from what I got from Amazon though (mine came in a plastic bag with a cardboard frame/holder) - unsurprising given that they've been around for ages though. AFAIK they were part of a much larger R/xxx line, that included some higher end open headphones and so on. For $35 they are not bad at all, and easily worth the $50 SRP or better. They aren't giant-slayers, at least not at the $500+ level, but I'd gladly take them over a lot of ~$100 units. I haven't heard those Panasonic 600s that are fairly popular though, so for all I know those are a better bet. They were out of stock when I went looking for a cheap closed headphone a few weeks ago. redface.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by binman13 View Post

Ooh, before I go, could I ask a final question.


The main difference, if any, between Studio and DJ Headphones (Headphone Noob)

Quote:
Originally Posted by CashNotCredit View Post

Marketing Gimmick A vs Marketing Gimmick B!

Could not have put it better myself!
Quote:
DJ Headphones tend to be closed and have a slightly boosted bass response. Some follow this stereotype, others don't.
Studio Headphones tend to be more neutral and can be open, closed, or semi open. Again, this isn't always the case.
I wouldn't put too much weight into something being called a studio headphone or a DJ headphone.
Many good headphones don't advertise themselves as either, and are used by plenty of DJs and in plenty of studios.

This too. There are "DJ style" and "Studio style" advert creations, but real studio headphones usually come out of a company's professional line (like Sony MDR-7xxx or Audio-Technica ATH-M series), and are often marked as "Studio Monitor" or "Monitor Series" headphones (designed for monitoring, which is what headphones are used for, not mastering, which uses speakers).

DJ headphones, at least true ones (like the Pioneer HDJ-2000) often have folding features that lend to being used by actual DJs, but again this isn't always the case, and there's tons of mis-labeled or mis-marketed products out there (for example the Beats Pro are marketed as "studio headphones" but are built like true DJ headphones, the original Bose TriPort were marketed as studio headphones for a while, but probably aren't a good choice for that (due to durability and a lack of isolation)).

Then there's just weird stuff, like the SRH-1840, which are marketed for basically anything under the sun. rolleyes.gif

I'd say aside from the "DJ style" tag where it gets you more fold-up options, and pro EFP/ENG headphones that have good isolation, I wouldn't worry about such labels.
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post


Yes. The packaging looks different from what I got from Amazon though (mine came in a plastic bag with a cardboard frame/holder) - unsurprising given that they've been around for ages though. AFAIK they were part of a much larger R/xxx line, that included some higher end open headphones and so on. For $35 they are not bad at all, and easily worth the $50 SRP or better. They aren't giant-slayers, at least not at the $500+ level, but I'd gladly take them over a lot of ~$100 units. I haven't heard those Panasonic 600s that are fairly popular though, so for all I know those are a better bet. They were out of stock when I went looking for a cheap closed headphone a few weeks ago. redface.gif
Could not have put it better myself!
This too. There are "DJ style" and "Studio style" advert creations, but real studio headphones usually come out of a company's professional line (like Sony MDR-7xxx or Audio-Technica ATH-M series), and are often marked as "Studio Monitor" or "Monitor Series" headphones (designed for monitoring, which is what headphones are used for, not mastering, which uses speakers).
DJ headphones, at least true ones (like the Pioneer HDJ-2000) often have folding features that lend to being used by actual DJs, but again this isn't always the case, and there's tons of mis-labeled or mis-marketed products out there (for example the Beats Pro are marketed as "studio headphones" but are built like true DJ headphones, the original Bose TriPort were marketed as studio headphones for a while, but probably aren't a good choice for that (due to durability and a lack of isolation)).
Then there's just weird stuff, like the SRH-1840, which are marketed for basically anything under the sun. rolleyes.gif
I'd say aside from the "DJ style" tag where it gets you more fold-up options, and pro EFP/ENG headphones that have good isolation, I wouldn't worry about such labels.

Yeah, and plus, there are so many things that go on in a studio that require different headphones.

Let's say you're mixing/mastering a song. You're going to want a very detailed and accurate pair of headphones (think HD800s). You're probably going to want them to be open, because that allows for a wider soundstage, and what not.

Now, let's say you're giving a pair of headphones to someone to record some vocals. Well, sound quality really doesn't matter here. All that matters is isolation. You don't want leakage from the headphones getting into the mic. These will be closed, and be of questionable sound quality, but will probably have awesome build quality, simply because they're designed to get used frequently and get thrown around by incompetent guitar players.

Now, let's say that you're referencing your mix to see what it will sound like on inferior equipment. I do some production work as a hobby, and I always try to see how my stuff sounds on ghetto earbuds, because that's what 80% of the population will be listening on.


All of these are "Studio" headphones, and they all have a purpose in the studio. But to compare the HD-800 to the M50 to a pair of iBuds, all of which I would own if I had a studio, is a bit asinine.

 

post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 

Just got them in the mail today, even better than I had hoped. Look great, feel comfortable, sound quality is great, ear-wreckingly loud if you want it to be. A bit sweaty but hey, they're great!
 

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