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Shouldn't An Analytical Sound Be Superior? - Page 2

post #16 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kees View Post

Does a concert sound analytical?

 

Depends on what kind of concert...  They can always "tune" (not really a tune) it to be analytical.  If they do though, no one will show up XD  Modern concerts (for modern genres) nowadays like to boost different areas...  

post #17 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

 

Depends on what kind of concert...  They can always "tune" (not really a tune) it to be analytical.  If they do though, no one will show up XD  Modern concerts (for modern genres) nowadays like to boost different areas...  


I do live sound for bands once and a while and all they keep screaming for is "MOAR BASS!!!"

post #18 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by BattleBrat View Post


I do live sound for bands once and a while and all they keep screaming for is "MOAR BASS!!!"

 

LOL...  And at the concert, I'm like, that's enough bass :p  I don't get the huge craze about having loads of bass...  I really don't.

post #19 of 49

If any audio setup (DAC-amp-phones/speakers) doesn't make the recording sound like I'm at a concert, if it doesn't put me there, it failed.

Setups that are called analytical never failed to fail in my book.

post #20 of 49

I would say that a sound that seems more "natural" rather than analytical would be the best sound signature. But then again it's up to debate as to what's natural sounding. I tend to find open headphones to be the most realistic sounding headphones. Something along the lines of the UR 55 or 40 by Koss, or probably something way more expensive but still open tongue.gif. Some of the lower end koss drivers manage to get a brilliantly natural, open sound.
 

post #21 of 49

depending on where you are sitting in a concert, and what type of concert ;)

post #22 of 49

You forget music is for enjoyment. It's not a test, or something you have to learn. So there is no reason  to analyze.

 

At the end of the day, its what you prefer. So figure out your ideal sound signature.

post #23 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pingupenguins View Post

You forget music is for enjoyment. It's not a test, or something you have to learn. So there is no reason  to analyze.

 

At the end of the day, its what you prefer. So figure out your ideal sound signature.


Exactly. If you take it to the extreme you are then not really listening for musical enjoyment but to just judge a piece of work. That is getting too technical IMO and would take away from my enjoyment of music. If anything I prefer a natural and effortless sound signature over neutral. If I can get all the detail of a neutral signature but more enjoyment, then why not?

post #24 of 49

An overly analytical headphone can definitely get tiresome to listen to, same with an overly colored headphone. I tend to enjoy the middle-ground between analytical and colored. An organic sound is really delish.

post #25 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bcool06 View Post

An overly analytical headphone can definitely get tiresome to listen to, same with an overly colored headphone. I tend to enjoy the middle-ground between analytical and colored. An organic sound is really delish.

 

Again, personal preference. The best advice to a budding audiophile is to just get out there and find your sound signature.

post #26 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pingupenguins View Post

 

Again, personal preference. The best advice to a budding audiophile is to just get out there and find your sound signature.

 

Of course. I thought the subjectivity of this thread was already well established. What I stated is just my personal taste, which I'm very fond of. atsmile.gif


Edited by Bcool06 - 8/6/12 at 7:20pm
post #27 of 49

Oh, I'm not calling you out, I'm just letting everyone know that this entire "audiophile" thing is subjective. And the best way to go about it, is to just experience it.

post #28 of 49

I agree. Most are looking for that absolute "perfect sound," when it's really YOUR perfect sound you need to find. So yea, experience is key.


Edited by Bcool06 - 8/6/12 at 7:34pm
post #29 of 49

Yeah...for me, I've found that I don't have to go too far beyond the koss porta pros or the sennheiser px models to get the perfect sound. I do have a pair of V6's on hand for watching movies or transcribing, but the smaller portables are perfect for just enjoying stuff.

 

I've tried and very breifly owned some much much more expensive headphones (and I do have an amplifier), but the sound wasn't better ENOUGH to justify the huge amount of money it was compared to the small price tag of something like the headphones I've mentioned.

 

I even tried out the hd 25s and I still prefer the PX 200 IIs to them.
 

post #30 of 49

lucky guy lol ^
as for me, my ears are just too damn picky, which means my wallet is the one usually paying the price :/

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