Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › Cardas Clarifier iPhone App
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cardas Clarifier iPhone App - Page 4

post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Eddy View Post

 

JJ got that started? No Schiit? 

 

A lot of audiophiles are sort of returded...

post #47 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by audionewbi View Post

Bought this app, have been using it for 3 moths cant say I hear any difference sonic wise.
It cannot make any difference because the only ferromagnetic material in a headphone driver is the permanent magnet. And this magnet doesn't demagnetize that fast due to sound playback. And if it did, the headphone would simply stop working at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by audionewbi View Post

It is 99 cent so it will not bankrupt you
That's the point of such apps - to get few people to try them "because it's cheap" and hope that eventually few * 0.99$ will become more than the cost of hiring an iOS coder for few hours to hack this app together.
Edited by mich41 - 2/10/13 at 9:04am
post #48 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mich41 View Post


It cannot make any difference because the only ferromagnetic material in a headphone driver is the permanent magnet. 

 

You're sure of that? Not just that there are no other magnetic materials, but that there are none that can be MADE magnetic? If this is true, then it is impossible for me to see how it could work. Or could materials in the housing have a slight effect if close enough? Wires even?

post #49 of 59
Here we go. Plastic housing, plastic diaphragm, copper (or aluminium) voice coil, magnets.

I never managed to magnetize copper or plastic. Maybe I didn't try hard enough.
post #50 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mich41 View Post

Here we go. Plastic housing, plastic diaphragm, copper (or aluminium) voice coil, magnets.
 

 

Well, there's the pole piece, which isn't a magnet, but is magnetized by the magnet proper.

 

Quote:
I never managed to magnetize copper or plastic. Maybe I didn't try hard enough.

 

Wimp! tongue.gif

 

se

post #51 of 59

Face it, it's a BS app.

post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mich41 View Post

Here we go. Plastic housing, plastic diaphragm, copper (or aluminium) voice coil, magnets.

I never managed to magnetize copper or plastic. Maybe I didn't try hard enough.

 

Maybe you should have used a power conditioner??

 

But seriously - that looks like about it the chances of this working. Otoh, it's nice to know that audio companies can consistently do something right.

post #53 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by xnor View Post

Face it, it's a BS app.

 

I have problems believing it is intended that way; when Jude tried to prevent criticism on the main thread the seller said, no, let the debate begin! Ummm, just like Chairman Mao when he wanted to find out who his enemies were, so he could send them to camps...

post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by scuttle View Post

 

I'm not saying the app works, but no. There are ferric components - or at least could be, depending on design details - that can get magnetized which shouldn't be, and this could have an effect on sq by interfering with the deliberate field. And it is possible that an annealing procedure might reduce the effect. 

 

...Which is an awful lot of possible, maybe, and could.

 

If we are talking about stuff in the headphone that all of the sudden became permanent magnets through regular music playback "magnetization": What would be the Curie temperature of such ferrites? and how would a sweep of tones (and music in the first place) played through a mighty iPod result in the required annealing (with out burning our heads to carbon bits and our headphones to plastic gooey stuff)? AFAIK formation (and demagnetization) of permanent magnets through annealing requires unsafe temperatures in the hundreds or thousands of degrees depending on alloy.

 

If we are talking about the pole piece which is not a permanent magnet. Then we are talking about degaussing something that is not a magnet, which I (and others) think makes no sense.


Quote:
Originally Posted by xnor View Post

Face it, it's a BS app.

 

 

So far it appears that it absolutely and definitively is.


Edited by ultrabike - 2/10/13 at 12:12pm
post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ultrabike View Post

 

If we are talking about stuff in the headphone that all of the sudden became permanent magnets through regular music playback "magnetization": What would be the Curie temperature of such ferrites? and how would a sweep of tones (and music in the first place) played through a mighty iPod result in the required annealing (with out burning our heads to carbon bits and our headphones to plastic gooey stuff)? AFAIK formation (and demagnetization) of permanent magnets through annealing requires unsafe temperatures in the hundreds or thousands of degrees depending on alloy.

 

By magnetic annealing I did NOT mean that the process would work through heating ferric components, but that the variation in intensity is annealing like! Or at least like that I am familiar with in the stochastic optimization technique "simulated annealing." My bad.


Edited by scuttle - 2/10/13 at 2:00pm
post #56 of 59

Well, to me it is still BSterious how the app works. If it doesn't, at least the consumer is not paying an annaling price.


Edited by ultrabike - 2/10/13 at 8:20pm
post #57 of 59
My favorite quote from the original thread:

"I did find that the sound was a tiny bit cleaner sounding after the treatment, like after you use some Windex to clean your windows."
post #58 of 59

Yeah, I found that one quite amusing as well.

post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by leogodoy View Post

My favorite quote from the original thread:

"I did find that the sound was a tiny bit cleaner sounding after the treatment, like after you use some Windex to clean your windows."

 

LMFAO how incredible is this statement. The veil has been lifted! 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Sound Science
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › Cardas Clarifier iPhone App