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Filing down Custom IEMS

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hey guys,

 

Just a quick question. I have a pair of custom IEMs and when i first got them, the canal area seems a little too thick. I sent it back for a refit but when it got back to me, it still seems a little too thick. I could send it back for another refit but i'm wondering if i could just file down the canal area myself with fine sandpaper and make it a little thinner? Thanks in advance!

post #2 of 6

I successfully modified my Westone ES5 tips using very fine sandpaper and buffing pads. For the sandpaper pads I used a set of Norton 3X Contour Pads. For buffing I used a set of Micro-Mesh Pen-Sanding Pads. 

 

I was modifying vinyl, not acrylic tips! However, I am quite certain that these materials would work on acrylic.

 

They can be purchased here:

http://www.leevalley.com/default.aspx?c=0

 

Modifying your tips undoubtedly voids your warranty. (Mine had already expired.) You also might irreparably screw things up. There is however the advantage of total control.

 

If you are going to do it, use good materials, not hardware store crap. And you must get both sanding and buffing materials. The above from Lee Valley Tools are excellent.

post #3 of 6
I am freaking amazed by all of the custom tip horror stories on this forum.

It seems like it would be a pretty straight foward process.

Ear impressions made, sent, scanned in 3D, duplicated. Simple right?

Oops, Forgot the human element in the mix.

I for one would hold the custom makers feet to the fire. Make them get it right.

Sorry for the rant, Jim
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstroTurf View Post

I am freaking amazed by all of the custom tip horror stories on this forum.
It seems like it would be a pretty straight foward process.
Ear impressions made, sent, scanned in 3D, duplicated. Simple right?
Oops, Forgot the human element in the mix.
I for one would hold the custom makers feet to the fire. Make them get it right.
Sorry for the rant, Jim

 

Human element is exactly right. But the issue in my view is usually the audiologist impressions, not on the manufacturer side. The big players are all using laser scanning with laser/acid etching to create the custom IEMs. That part is accurate. However on the molds side it's garbage in, garbage out.

post #5 of 6
That is exactly why, If someone is going to have this done. They need to educate themselves of the proper processes.

Jim
post #6 of 6

Yes.

 

(Also have very clean ears. Just a little bit of caked wax can prevent the ear canals from responding evenly to the injected material.)

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