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my ears have become "sensitive", "vulnerable"? - Page 2

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddragon View Post

i couldnt find yotube carbon based lifeforms and i think maybe i only have general ear fatique and should use my headphone less often

Ah, no biggie. Maybe it's the headphone itself...try a few different pair, or perhaps listening level?

At any rate listening less often is not an option. L3000.gif

post #17 of 29

I have the same problem with loud noises in general. It's called hyperacusis and for me, it's permanent (although this can be a temporary thing too.) It's a result of hearing damage that has occurred from chronic exposure to loud noise, mainly from headphones and playing music (sax.) I do have some tinnitus as well. I have read that the reason this happens is because there are less hair cells so the sound pressure is greater because there are less hair cells to absorb the sound. It is called 'recruitment' as your body is recruiting the remaining hair cells to take on the work load. Protect your ears, turn it down, and take breaks when your ears are fatigued.


Edited by Jbucla2005 - 7/25/12 at 1:01am
post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by paradoxper View Post

Ah, no biggie. Maybe it's the headphone itself...try a few different pair, or perhaps listening level?

At any rate listening less often is not an option. L3000.gif

 

 

hahahaha well, i usually listen to my ipod and doesnt use my comp that often because its a 3 years old laptop and turning it on and off takes long time and i dont want it to freeze. so with my ipod classic 160gb, i have the volume locked in the default volume, then line out to the fiio e17 which is set to be 24 (with the 6db gain by default on the e17) to my beyer dt990 pro 250 ohms. i doubt you have exactly the same things as me but if you do, this is the volume im listening on. and about headphones, sometimes i would use my koss tbse1 and sometimes i would also get ear fatique, probably because it also takes less power to drive it and i dont lower the volume enough. dont recall getting much ear fatique on my stock fostex t50rp which i dont use that often because of its "werid" sound. like a lot of people say, they sound "wonky", wont be able to better describe it better myself.


Edited by reddragon - 7/25/12 at 1:05am
post #19 of 29

try not to use headphones or iems for about a week. and see if it goes off. try using speakers with low volume for the meantime if you want to hear music.

post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyaems View Post

try not to use headphones or iems for about a week. and see if it goes off. try using speakers with low volume for the meantime if you want to hear music.

 

 

 

well i havent really used my headphone for long listening session for about a day and it takes longer for my ears to get tired but they will eventually get tired i think

post #21 of 29

Why not just go to see the doctor or audiologist to do some checking?

post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hkppl View Post

Why not just go to see the doctor or audiologist to do some checking?

 

 

 

already did that and he found nothing wrong with my ears when he checked the inside of my ears and i also could hear every high frequency note that he plays

post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyaems View Post

try not to use headphones or iems for about a week. and see if it goes off. try using speakers with low volume for the meantime if you want to hear music.


I agree. I found recently when I bought some new IEMs that I had the problem you're describing, but it happened after extended critical listening (i.e. trying to deconstruct the sound to see which earphones had best sound signature, staging, frequency responses, etc.) I took a week or so off from listening to anything (other than occassional background music or TV through speakers, not earphones). When I came back to my earphones the problem was gone and I can fully enjoy them again.

 

Based on my understanding of hearing (it's been over 10 years since I studied it at uni), there are some active structures in the ear designed to protect our hearing from loud noise, etc. My theory on the fatigue is that extended strenuous listening (high volumes, critical listening, large dynamic range in the music, etc.) may lead to those mechanisms being overworked. If that's the case, it'd be like doing a huge long run or workout and then having sore muscles for the next few days.

 

In short: try resting your ears and see what happens. Good luck!!

post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loquah View Post


I agree. I found recently when I bought some new IEMs that I had the problem you're describing, but it happened after extended critical listening (i.e. trying to deconstruct the sound to see which earphones had best sound signature, staging, frequency responses, etc.) I took a week or so off from listening to anything (other than occassional background music or TV through speakers, not earphones). When I came back to my earphones the problem was gone and I can fully enjoy them again.

 

Based on my understanding of hearing (it's been over 10 years since I studied it at uni), there are some active structures in the ear designed to protect our hearing from loud noise, etc. My theory on the fatigue is that extended strenuous listening (high volumes, critical listening, large dynamic range in the music, etc.) may lead to those mechanisms being overworked. If that's the case, it'd be like doing a huge long run or workout and then having sore muscles for the next few days.

 

In short: try resting your ears and see what happens. Good luck!!

 

 

 

thanks, thats very insightful

post #25 of 29
First, paragraphs.

Second, back off the volume. Sensitivity to loud volume is usually your ears indicating that you're entering hearing damage territory. I would get a decibel meter app and roughly check what levels you're listening at. Obviously without some sort of acoustic coupler you can't take that kind of reading seriously but it will give you a ballpark figure.

Then, if you read up on Noise Induced Hearing Loss, you'll probably find a chart of safe listening levels, which will correlate decibels to how much time you can listen before you risk hearing damage. Keep in mind that this data is a guideline based on statistical averages, and may not be directly applicable to everybody. Generally speaking, at 85dB you're already risking hearing loss, though most places will tell you that you're safe listening to an average of 85dB for 8 hours or so.

You may also want to read up on Hyperacusis, but that's a medical condition that's quite a bit more extreme than what you're describing, and it doesn't really sound like what's going on. But who knows.

Third, the DT990 is still fatiguing, but looking at its measurements the fatigue seems to be more from elevated treble than resonances in the highs. I would definitely EQ the treble down a bit. You may look into getting something with a flatter frequency response - HD600 or HD650 would be better, ESP950 would be better still, and SR-007 would be the best at least for fatigue-free listening, but now we're talking about real money. Still a used ESP950 is reasonably affordable and you get Koss's nifty lifetime no-questions-asked warranty too.
post #26 of 29

DT990 are probably the MOST sibilant and fatiguing headphones I have tried!

post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholars View Post

DT990 are probably the MOST sibilant and fatiguing headphones I have tried!

 

 

 

ever tried the sony z1000?

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddragon View Post

 

 

 

ever tried the sony z1000?

 

No but change your DT990 to something different and your pain will go away. As headphones go they are definately up there with the brightest, most sibilant headphones that will give you hearing loss!

post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholars View Post

 

No but change your DT990 to something different and your pain will go away. As headphones go they are definately up there with the brightest, most sibilant headphones that will give you hearing loss!

 

 

 

haha alright, in a few months, i should have my mad dog t50rp

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