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Beats Are Magical! And Other Nearly-Criminal Marketing Schemes - Page 4

post #46 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholars View Post

It goes on a lot with loads of different products but they seem to get away with it. Clearly the government or similar agencies are just too lazy to bother with trivial things like this.

*insert self-censored political statement here*

 

There are unintended consequences of both a stronger and a weaker government.  Beyond that, I'll leave politics out of it.

post #47 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kosmik Panda View Post

I do the same. My friend bought a pair of pros full price (MSRP) and I asked him why he got them he said" Because they sound they best, dumbass." I told him that for 400$ you can headphones that surpass beats in sound quality, for almost half the price. Of course he goes on saying all this stupid stuff about how beats are the best headphones ever, and pretty much what all their ads want you to think. This is what happens to me when I try to tell them the facts, and when i offer them to listen to my hd558, they want no part in it. Asking "O i've never heard of Sennheiser, so that means they must suck!" Now they just piss me off.

I completely agree. They just refuse to try anything else. Maybe they know in their mind that beats arr sub par and it's just to convince themselves?
post #48 of 434

I think the term is 'confirmation bias'.

 

It exists here too, but it's not as clear-cut an affront to the actual reality of the situation as Beats vs. most cans in the price-range are.

post #49 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kosmik Panda View Post

I do the same. My friend bought a pair of pros full price (MSRP) and I asked him why he got them he said" Because they sound they best, dumbass." I told him that for 400$ you can headphones that surpass beats in sound quality, for almost half the price. Of course he goes on saying all this stupid stuff about how beats are the best headphones ever, and pretty much what all their ads want you to think. This is what happens to me when I try to tell them the facts, and when i offer them to listen to my hd558, they want no part in it. Asking "O i've never heard of Sennheiser, so that means they must suck!" Now they just piss me off.

If you have never heard of sennheiser then you deserve to love the beats, but then again ignorance is bliss.

post #50 of 434

Really I think beats owners are a lost cause anyway. Clearly they are purchasing them as a fashion statement more than a high quality source of audio and also they are clearly very easily influenced by media and fashion so just leave them to it I say. If they are happy with the crappy product that they have paid a significant sum of money for then as long as it makes them happy then just leave them to it!.... I still think that is false advertising though and should be illegal.... It is similar to HDMI cables claiming better picture quality etc.

post #51 of 434
Thread Starter 

I don't think quite that the government just turns a blind eye to false advertising like that, it's just that they don't employ experts in every field. We have regulatory bodies (I'm speaking about the U.S. here) that are made up of very general jobs, but have very little expertise and specifics where product claims are concerned. This is a condition cause by issues on both sides of the regulatory argument.

post #52 of 434

What I meant is that whether it is intentional or not the government are too lazy and stingy to investigate and enforce legislation on these sort of things. It is very bad for the consumer really because there is a LOT of very misleading false advertising going on but the government agencies do not do a very good job controlling this at all. This applies to many areas such as headphones, electronics, food etc etc. Things could be worse I suppose but really I think they should make more effort to crack down on false advertising and misleading product descriptions because at the moment manufacturers can get away with blatant lies and false information quite easily!


Edited by nicholars - 7/22/12 at 4:36pm
post #53 of 434

i read the title as justin beats

post #54 of 434

maybe they are in denial that they spent $300 on something that sounds a quarter of the price

post #55 of 434
Thread Starter 

On the other hand, there are companies which, while we don't necessarily like them much here on Head-Fi, are generally more truthful when it comes to advertising. With a few notable exceptions, Bose tends to focus more on buzz words like enjoyment and promote their noise cancellation instead of claiming to be the standard of audio, which they very well could get away with the way headphone distribution and advertising works here.

post #56 of 434

I have no problem with companies advertising however they want except for I do not think it is acceptable to flat out lie and make false claims such as "adds back what mp3 compression takes away" or "used in professional recording studios".... Another example of this is HDMI cables from companies such as Monster which claim to "enhance contrast and colours" or "reduce picture noise" when in reality this is another completely false claim / outright lie as all HDMI cables are identical image as long as they are not faulty.  I do not like Monster as a company because I think they are dishonest and have poor policies etc. I would never buy a monster product out of principle!

post #57 of 434
Thread Starter 

Sadly, Beats learned from Monster and have grown in lies even after leaving the company.

post #58 of 434
Thread Starter 

Here's a couple more:

 

1000

Nobody has ever broken a Beats Solo HD. We even added a token piece of metal and a shady-sounding paragraph that subtly references an alternate dimension in which the original Solo once broke all the time to prove it.

 

1000

Bluetooth can totally transmit lossless. Just ask the people trying to sell your Bluetooth headphones.

post #59 of 434

Practically indestructible.

No cheap plastic, no frayed cords. Beats Pro headphones are made with an aluminum gun metal frame with a black matte anodized finish, encasing overstuffed leather ear cups


"Yup, never heard of AKG and V-Moda, cuz OUR metal frames are a first. Also, we're indirectly bashing our Plastic Solos and Studios." 

post #60 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholars View Post

What I meant is that whether it is intentional or not the government are too lazy and stingy to investigate and enforce legislation on these sort of things. It is very bad for the consumer really because there is a LOT of very misleading false advertising going on but the government agencies do not do a very good job controlling this at all. This applies to many areas such as headphones, electronics, food etc etc. Things could be worse I suppose but really I think they should make more effort to crack down on false advertising and misleading product descriptions because at the moment manufacturers can get away with blatant lies and false information quite easily!

The United States is metaphorically running on large corporations and companies. If you think about it, it is actually quite obvious. If it doesn't look good and doesn't have lots of bass, you're an "outcast." The media has sculpted personalities and the same mindset of bass and looks. In addition, many companies like Apple make patents of their "innovations," such as Apple's slide to unlock. There was recently a lawsuit against Samsung that Apple filed because it apparently looked too similarly to an iPhone, which it didn't. Patents were originally intended so little companies could compete with large companies, but this isn't the case, and nothing is really done about it.

 

Just my two cents on the mindset of beets and large companies in general.

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