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Oxidation cross contamination?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

This might have been addressed on here before, but a quick search through the threads on oxidation didn't turn it up.  The question is, if you have an oxidized plug, and you're using that in your source device, and also using it with other headphones, will that oxidation transfer to the output on the source, and in turn to the male plugs of your other headphones?  I find myself asking after just buying a new amp, which I plan on using mostly with my DT 1350s.  However at night in bed I like to fall asleep listening to an old pair of PX 100s because they're more comfortable and I'm not worried about damaging them.  However there's some oxidation on the PX 100 plug.  I wiped it down with some alcohol on a cloth pad, and it's shinier, but still doesn't look brand new.  I just want to avoid any of that oxidation affecting the newer equipment, not even sure if this is a valid concern though.  Thanks in advance or any help/advice.

post #2 of 7

The oxidation in question could definitely start to corrode the jack.  I would suggest replacing the plug if possible.

post #3 of 7

Oxidation isn't migratory.

 

se

post #4 of 7
Fix it. Put some DeOxit on it.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwkarth View Post

Fix it. Put some DeOxit on it.

That's not always the answer. You can't use Deoxit on HD800 connectors for example, or on the female end because it can drip into the plug. Anyone who has worked with HD800 plugs knows how small the room is to work with inside those things, and Deoxit will cause corrosion of certain materials (other than the wanted ones) in an enclosed area. On their website they even warn you to only use it in open places. I had a customer do this, and the inside of the HD800 connectors were filled with blue liquid, and no longer worked so needed repair. There was no reason for him to use it anyway. A lot of audiophiles use it because they think they will get further improvement from their components when there is no corrosion to begin with.
Edited by IPodPJ - 7/21/12 at 8:43pm
post #6 of 7

Could always try to find a male to female plug and use that or an extension cord if your worried about it. This way it's just contacting the plug or extension cable and not what your worried about damaging.

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by IPodPJ View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kwkarth View Post

Fix it. Put some DeOxit on it.

That's not always the answer. You can't use Deoxit on HD800 connectors for example, or on the female end because it can drip into the plug. Anyone who has worked with HD800 plugs knows how small the room is to work with inside those things, and Deoxit will cause corrosion of certain materials (other than the wanted ones) in an enclosed area. On their website they even warn you to only use it in open places. I had a customer do this, and the inside of the HD800 connectors were filled with blue liquid, and no longer worked so needed repair. There was no reason for him to use it anyway. A lot of audiophiles use it because they think they will get further improvement from their components when there is no corrosion to begin with.

The additional benefit of using D5 as recommended is that is dissolves atmospheric contaminants deposited on contact surfaces in addition to chemically reversing oxidation and providing a microfilm coating which helps prevent further oxidation. As you say, though, it's not a panacea. Seems to me, the most often made mistake folks make, which I've done myself, is to not wipe off any excess / use too much which can create more problems than it solves.
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