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Carnivores gather round. - Page 5

post #61 of 80

Please don't attempt to lecture me on livestock nutrition.  I've been around animals all my life, and I have bred, birthed, fed and slaughtered them.  I competed and won at the state level in market and breeding stock competitions, and I also won judging and carcass contests.  My wife is a food scientist, and my best friend is an agricultural scientist.

 

As my wife often says, there are two Laws of Food Science:

1) Fat tastes good

2) Salt makes fat taste better

post #62 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

 

 

As my wife often says, there are two Laws of Food Science:

1) Fat tastes good

2) Salt makes fat taste better

And thus according to the transitive property of Fat(by yours truly)

If fat tastes good and salt makes fat taste better and salt makes fat tasting better means that you make bacon

Bacon tastes good when it has fat as fat tastes good.

 

a=b and b=c, then a=c or....bacon.

post #63 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post

And thus according to the transitive property of Fat(by yours truly)

If fat tastes good and salt makes fat taste better and salt makes fat tasting better means that you make bacon

Bacon tastes good when it has fat as fat tastes good.

 

a=b and b=c, then a=c or....bacon.

 

Self-evident!  Which, of course, is why adding bacon to ANYTHING makes it taste better.

post #64 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

Please don't attempt to lecture me on livestock nutrition.  I've been around animals all my life, and I have bred, birthed, fed and slaughtered them.  I competed and won at the state level in market and breeding stock competitions, and I also won judging and carcass contests.  My wife is a food scientist, and my best friend is an agricultural scientist.

 

As my wife often says, there are two Laws of Food Science:

1) Fat tastes good

2) Salt makes fat taste better

 

You're obviously not talking about commercial feedlot beef then. And I noticed that you didn't refute anything I said specifically, but are asserting yourself as an absolute authority on the matter anyways. More power to you!

 

Warnings about toxins in animal fat go back to the old testament.


Edited by grokit - 7/14/12 at 2:52pm
post #65 of 80

*sigh* I don't refute everything you say because you tend to say so much...

 

I'll start with this:  if you don't know why cottonseed hulls, peanut hulls and other high-fiber ingredients are added to grains, you should find out.

post #66 of 80

I would assume that the reason high-fiber ingredients are added to grain is because the cow would die without them, again because they didn't evolve to be raised on grain. Please enlighten me on why I am wrong again.

 

You should really investigate why there is so much less omega-3s and cholesterol in animals that are allowed to eat living plants with active digestive enzymes.

 

It's the same with their milk, farmed vs. wild fish, and even chicken eggs. I get my eggs from chickens that are fed with organic, fermented grains, supplemented with bags of spinach. Garbage in, garbage out as they say.

 

I don't want unnecessary toxins in my diet, or to have to take statin pills for high triglyceride levels. But hey they're your arteries, do what you like.

post #67 of 80

Wait - I thought we were arguing about which *tastes* better.  This seems to have morphed into which is better for you.  Not the same thing at all.

post #68 of 80

"My uncle used to be a Butcher, and his family sent my family a bunch of grass fed beef steaks once, also telling us how much better they were. I definitely believed them, until I took a bite. I will now take corn fed to grass fed any day.

 

"I used to feel that way until i got the really great stuff. Grass fed seems not to be as consistent until you find a great producer. The steaks I get now have even more marbling than most of the corn fed steaks I've eaten and are far more flavorful. The not as good stuff can be tough and too lean.

 

"Argentine beef is all grass fed and regarded as some of the best beef in the world. I visited once and have not eaten anything close to that quality (grass fed or corn fed). Some people are good at raising great grass fed beef and some are not."

 

At lest the debate on taste isn't limited to the two of us:

 

Which is best- Corn Fed or Grass Fed Beef?

 

Vastly inferior? I don't think that can be supported factually. It's a matter of taste, which comes from what you are accustomed to.


Edited by grokit - 7/14/12 at 3:25pm
post #69 of 80

Tell that to the meat buyer at Morton's, or to Wolfgang Puck at Cut:

http://www.wolfgangpuck.com/content/files/foodmenu_CUT%20BH%20MENU%2012.9.11%20for%20website.%20do%20not%20use.pdf

 

Check the percentage of USDA prime beef that is grass fed.  The lower fat content will typically push grass-fed beef down to the Choice or Select grades.  There are exceptions, such as the grass-fed wagyu beef, but those are just that, exceptions.

post #70 of 80

Another exception, the other way around, is a state fair-winning, corn-fed steer. Very different from a commercial feedlot operation.

 

Grass fed beef can have good marbling if it's finished properly with grains. Unfortunately not all producers are doing this. The overall fat content is the very similar with both kinds of beef, but the fat is distributed differently. On a grass-fed steer, a much higher percentage of the fat is distributed to the outside of the animal, right under the skin. So it's butchered differently, where most of this fat is trimmed off to appeal to the health (and value)-conscious consumer.

 

That Puck meat menu is incredible, I would love to try that Kobe sashimi sometime! U.S. farms raising American Wagyu (cross-bred with Angus) still feed their cattle a combination of grass and grains. But the genuine stuff is fed and finished on grass. A Kobe-"style" NY Strip goes for around $50 a pound, the real stuff is quite a bit higher.

Plus the real ones get to drink beerbeerchug.gif!


Edited by grokit - 7/14/12 at 4:08pm
post #71 of 80

One of the reasons Morton's steak is so great great is the different way they cook em.


Edited by Redcarmoose - 7/14/12 at 5:19pm
post #72 of 80

I've never been to a Morton's but I do like the the results that Ruths Chris gets with their 1800°f ovens. But besides the Argentine barbeque, the best commercial beef I ever had was at Peter Luger's in NYC, they served the four of us what seemed like the entire cross section of a steer!

 

But the very best was at the ranch I grew up at. Timothy hay in the winter, Timothy grass in the summer, and finished with grain before slaughter.

 

The pork was even better, fed with expired dairy from the distributor we bartered with, slopped with table scraps, and finished with sour apples and grain. The bacon and ham etc. was smoked but never cured.


Edited by grokit - 7/14/12 at 4:18pm
post #73 of 80

*All* commercial beef starts out grass-fed.  The difference between grass-fed and corn-fed *is* the finishing 60-120 days.  If you feed the steer corn to finish it, then it's not grass-fed.

 

And I think you are dwelling a little too much on feedlot vs exhibition livestock.  I never said I knew nothing about feedlot practices.  My family also raised livestock commercially, as did my grandparents and my in-laws.  Not on a mass-scale - my family was actually in the dairy business, not beef - but we also had commercial beef and lambs in addition to my show stock.  The Harris Ranch feedlot in Coalinga (largest feedlot in California at ~150M lbs per year according to wikipedia) was less than 2 hours from where I grew-up.  So, yeah, I've smelled my fair share of feedlots...

post #74 of 80

Why is there such a difference between the CAFO cattle that move to feedlots once they hit 650 or 750 pounds in just three to four months, a weight it takes the average cow twelve months to reach on pasture? Is it all growth hormones?

 

There's another difference between real Kobe beef and the cross bred American version. Besides the beer they actually get "relieved with a happy ending" on a regular basis. Those are some happy cattle!

 

But to go back to the Argentine stuff, what I like is that they have beef that is recognized as some of the best on the planet, and it doesn't cost any extra. It's just what's at the market. Here if you just buy whatever is at the market you get an inferior product. You have to seek the good stuff out, and pay a premium for it.

post #75 of 80

So out of many types of beef..which one tastes better!? Corn fed or Grass fed? AS A PANDA MEISTER... I know the answer...and it is THE ONLY ANSWER....

*drum roll*

 

The one that tastes better of course t(ツ)_/¯

It's on my plate and taste buds! tongue.gif

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