Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › what's the oldest spec laptop you'd recommend for office work?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

what's the oldest spec laptop you'd recommend for office work? - Page 2

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eudoxa View Post

wow, that one is pretty.  I want one for myself...maybe I'll give him mine and buy this one for me.  rolleyes.gif

Funny I have a girly white Samsung. Looks like they tried to make em look like Macs. Actually Sony and Samsung are my favorite brands. I don't know why they cost so little.My N148Plus Samsung works great! It is on almost all the time! The batteries last a super long time time, both a far as a charge and they last years in age.

post #17 of 29

2X

post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

I'll put aside the comment that an "older gentleman" is "~40-50 years old" - but you're on my list you young scalliwag - and d@mnit, get off my lawn!

 

The process stays the same:

 

1) Determine what the user wants to *do* with the computer.  Browse the internet and look at pron videos?  Play Pac Man (or whatever you young bucks do these days)?  Design multi-billion dollar office buildings for the Saudi Royal Family?  Run a mathematical simulation model of the event horizon of a black hole?

 

2) Select the best software to accomplish #1.

 

3) Select the best hardware to run #2.

 

Nearly everyone does this exactly back-@ss-wards.  They buy a whiz-bang computer, then they buy some whiz-bang software, then they try to make the software do whatever they really wanted to do - and the whole thing fails miserably because it doesn't do what they need or doesn't run well - or they spent way more money than they really needed to.

 

  

wheelchair-smiley-face.gif

 

 

I never though about it that way :D That's really smart!

post #19 of 29

I think the majority of uses for the atom-powered netbooks are now being met by a tablet.  Several years ago my company bought netbooks for their road warriors, and all they used them for was the browser & email.  Tablets now have so much better screens than the typical netbooks, and if you need more than what a tablet can do, then you can get an ultra thin notebook like a 13" Sony Vaio.  The netbooks are really a dying niche.  We also had some employees with poorer eyesight that absolutely hated the netbooks.

post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

I think the majority of uses for the atom-powered netbooks are now being met by a tablet.  Several years ago my company bought netbooks for their road warriors, and all they used them for was the browser & email.  Tablets now have so much better screens than the typical netbooks, and if you need more than what a tablet can do, then you can get an ultra thin notebook like a 13" Sony Vaio.  The netbooks are really a dying niche.  We also had some employees with poorer eyesight that absolutely hated the netbooks.

There would be very little reason to get an atom netbook with stuff like this floating around. 

 

 

laptop.JPG

 

 

People purchased netbooks because of the great prices too, not just the form factor. Ipads are great but having a dedicated keyboard is still liked by some. You would be amazed how expensive Ipads are in some parts of the world. They are not the same price all over. Folks who are in the market for a $399 device have a much narrower price window which actually makes Ipads cost a big factor.

post #21 of 29

Yup - that's true.  I actually hate trying to spec the low-end of computers - there are always so many trade-offs and invariably, you find out AFTER you deliver the unit that there was an undocumented requirement that just happens to fall smack on top of one of those trade-offs.  "Oh, you wanted to use this to access a client-server application that requires the installation of a large fat client?  Yeah, well, that's not going to work on a netbook with minimum memory and drive space that is not upgradeable..."

post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

Yup - that's true.  I actually hate trying to spec the low-end of computers - there are always so many trade-offs and invariably, you find out AFTER you deliver the unit that there was an undocumented requirement that just happens to fall smack on top of one of those trade-offs.  "Oh, you wanted to use this to access a client-server application that requires the installation of a large fat client?  Yeah, well, that's not going to work on a netbook with minimum memory and drive space that is not upgradeable..."

How bad have netbooks gotten in recent years? Sheesh.

I have one of the original Intel release models (so right after they cloned the VIA platform, thank god it has no C7 in it) and I can swap out the disk drive, RAM, mini PCIex, etc. I've yet to find some "desktop crap" application it can't run - it just won't do 3D, HD, or DCC/progl noise.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post


How bad have netbooks gotten in recent years? Sheesh.
I have one of the original Intel release models (so right after they cloned the VIA platform, thank god it has no C7 in it) and I can swap out the disk drive, RAM, mini PCIex, etc. I've yet to find some "desktop crap" application it can't run - it just won't do 3D, HD, or DCC/progl noise.

 

If you buy the *right* netbook, it's a not a problem.  We had some Toshiba units (bought before I arrived) that were loaded with XP home.  Since there was no optical drive, upgrading it to XP Pro so we could join it to the domain was Royal PIA!!  After messing around with flash drives, boot images, etc, we finally said screw-it and just put them on our guest wireless and told them to VPN into the corp network.  We're going to rotate them out of our environment as soon as we can.

post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

If you buy the *right* netbook, it's a not a problem.  We had some Toshiba units (bought before I arrived) that were loaded with XP home.  Since there was no optical drive, upgrading it to XP Pro so we could join it to the domain was Royal PIA!!  After messing around with flash drives, boot images, etc, we finally said screw-it and just put them on our guest wireless and told them to VPN into the corp network.  We're going to rotate them out of our environment as soon as we can.

I stopped reading at "Toshiba" and guessed the rest - call me jaded. rolleyes.gif
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by obobskivich View Post


I stopped reading at "Toshiba" and guessed the rest - call me jaded. rolleyes.gif

I have to say, of the stacks of laptops I have had Toshiba and Hewlett Packard are by far the hottest running, which in my book makes them clunkers!!eek.gif

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post

I have to say, of the stacks of laptops I have had Toshiba and Hewlett Packard are by far the hottest running, which in my book makes them clunkers!!eek.gif

 

Dell's are better now, but back a few years ago, they were real scorchers!  I remember a Dell 600-series (I think that's what it was) that could burn the hair off your legs if you tried to put it on your legs while you were wearing shorts.  And, since the vents were on the bottom, if you laid it down on the rug or your bed while it was running, it would either shutdown or blue-screen after about 15 minutes.

 

Going back to the OP, I think this is one of the big advantages of the latest processors.  They have been engineered to lower the clock speed while not losing performance and they have much lower power consumption and much higher efficiency - all contributing to lower temps.

 

Still, I can tell you that my nice thin Sony Vaio has a fairly noisy fan when it kicks on.  I guess that form factor has it's trade-offs.  It's very noticeable when you try to use the on-board microphone.


Edited by billybob_jcv - 7/14/12 at 5:43pm
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

 

Dell's are better now, but back a few years ago, they were real scorchers!  I remember a Dell 600-series (I think that's what it was) that could burn the hair off your legs if you tried to put it on your legs while you were wearing shorts.  And, since the vents were on the bottom, if you laid it down on the rug or your bed while it was running, it would either shutdown or blue-screen after about 15 minutes.

So funny! You have to wonder what they were thinking?

 

Some of my older laptops ran a little hot but some were crazy hot.lol

 

I am pretty narrow minded. I look at it this way. A company can keep trying to add stuff in and make a laptop do more stuff and that is fine, but once they make something that is totally over the top ( as far as heat goes ) and release it to the public at large, I will never buy that brand again. There is just too many cool laptops out there. Every issue I have ever had has been due to too much heat or the design of Windows. These are maybe some of the reasons why Macintosh is better in many eyes.

post #28 of 29

The absolute oldest specs I would recommend are

  • Core 2 Duo.
  • 2 gigs of RAM.
  • 160-gig hard drive.
  • Xubuntu as the OS.

 

Otherwise, these specs should be fine.

  • i3.
  • 4 gigs of RAM.
  • 500-gig hard drive.
  • Win7 Pro as the OS.

 

Recommended screen size is either 14" or 15".


Edited by HPuser9083 - 5/18/13 at 8:39pm
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

 

If you buy the *right* netbook, it's a not a problem.  We had some Toshiba units (bought before I arrived) that were loaded with XP home.  Since there was no optical drive, upgrading it to XP Pro so we could join it to the domain was Royal PIA!!  After messing around with flash drives, boot images, etc, we finally said screw-it and just put them on our guest wireless and told them to VPN into the corp network.  We're going to rotate them out of our environment as soon as we can.


Dude, as far as netbooks go, best OS choice would be some sort of lightweight Linux distro, specifically Crunchbang, AntiX, or Lubuntu. Although as far as putting Windows on one goes, that's where external optical drives come in.


Edited by HPuser9083 - 8/9/12 at 8:46am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › what's the oldest spec laptop you'd recommend for office work?