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Soldering irons or stations you use - Page 3

post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ix912 View Post

I've taught soldering for 4 years at university and have encountered many soldering irons (I was also the lab technician so I repaired them)... I'd have to say the best choice for consumer use would be the Hakko 936. Extremely durable and reliable. You wont regret it. But make sure you buy a genuine Hakko... there are a lot of fakes floating around on ebay.

 

+2

post #32 of 39

Anyone know how to tell a Fake Hakko from a real one?

 

 

Here is where I got mine.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HAKKO-936-907-ESD-SAFE-SOLDERING-STATION-w-STAND-/271016676903?_trksid=p4340.m1985&_trkparms=aid%3D444000%26algo%3DSOI.CURRENT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D13%26meid%3D640136796139465382%26pid%3D100012%26prg%3D1014%26rk%3D2%26#ht_500wt_1287

post #33 of 39

The one in the picture appears to be authentic. But if you are still unsure, you could take a look at this post:

http://www.head-fi.org/t/531570/is-this-a-counterfeit-hakko-936
 

post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post

I was looking at the Aoyue's, they are clone Hakkou's but the reviews state that they are actually good for the priice, good warranty and service and replaceable tips. Etc, 

 

I've used a refurbished Aoyue that I bought through Amazon and it's been pretty good so far.  Good temperature control, decent iron ergonomics.  The tip that came with it wasn't the best though, but should be easily replaceable. 

post #35 of 39

I'm very happy with my Hakko FX-888. Despite the hideous color, I love the form factor. I don't have a dedicated work area, so my family alternate using the dinner table for sewing (wife), artwork (daughter) and soldering (me). It is so easy to move and store the unit in a small, short cabinet.* My friends Weller WES51 would not be quite so moveable -- and I prefer the Hakko to my brief time trying his Weller.

 

In addition, the local Fry's has numerous Hakko tips for purchase, should I need more. I bought my unit from Amazon, but have subsequently seen a dozen 888 units for sale at Fry's.

 

*I thoroughly clean up my work area of leaded solder, of course.

post #36 of 39
Originally Posted by ix912 View Post

I've taught soldering for 4 years at university and have encountered many soldering irons (I was also the lab technician so I repaired them)... I'd have to say the best choice for consumer use would be the Hakko 936. Extremely durable and reliable. You wont regret it. But make sure you buy a genuine Hakko... there are a lot of fakes floating around on ebay.

 

Thanks very helpful!

post #37 of 39

I use a Metcal MX5010.  It's pretty awesome.

post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mchang View Post

I'm very happy with my Hakko FX-888. Despite the hideous color, I love the form factor. I don't have a dedicated work area, so my family alternate using the dinner table for sewing (wife), artwork (daughter) and soldering (me). It is so easy to move and store the unit in a small, short cabinet.* My friends Weller WES51 would not be quite so moveable -- and I prefer the Hakko to my brief time trying his Weller.

 

In addition, the local Fry's has numerous Hakko tips for purchase, should I need more. I bought my unit from Amazon, but have subsequently seen a dozen 888 units for sale at Fry's.

 

*I thoroughly clean up my work area of leaded solder, of course.

I use a teflon baking mat to keep the tabletop clean. If you get one, make sure it's either NSF certified or otherwise says it handles 475F (250C). There are lower temperature ones out there. These are good enough to survive solder splashes and a few seconds of your hot iron. If you have the cash, you can get ESD safe high temperature mats, but they run $100us and more.

post #39 of 39

Thanks for the suggestion, SiBurning! I've been using a cutting mat under my work area with good success.

 

I've had 1-2 drops of hot solder drop on it with no ill effects. I have not accidentally placed my iron tip on the surface yet (not that I plan to), so I've have not had to test the thermal threshold yet.

 

This isn't my exact mat, but is same brand:

700

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