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Soldering irons or stations you use

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 

HEllo, I am about to start DIY'ing again. I did some light projects and other projects that used solder irons and have two of them but they were basically one use projects and the irons have gone to who knows where. And they were cheap so it's not like I can just scrub it clean and all. Plus I need temp control so those are out anyway.

 

I was looking at Wellers and then was recommended that Aoyue was better AT THIS PRICE of $40 approx and saw some 937+ and 936...however I won't be using this that often and only for light audio and other projects. One that I am about to go on again. My previous DIY projects didn't need a variable temp iron as they weren't with audio and for other more mechanical things I could easily do.

 

AFter debating, I figured I don't need those $50 sets

http://tangentsoft.net/audio/new-diyer.html

http://www.mediacollege.com/misc/solder/tools.html

 

And these two guides helped that set of thought

 

So I figured I'd go for

http://www.amazon.com/Stahl-Tools-Variable-Temperature-Soldering/dp/B0029N70WM/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

 

Anybody have this unit?

 

I will buy these as well

http://www.dealextreme.com/p/weitu-stainless-steel-straight-and-angled-tweezerses-2-piece-set-19915

http://www.amazon.com/American-Terminal-AT-31604-Solder-Ounces/dp/B00030AP48/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1341523971&sr=1-1&keywords=solder

http://www.amazon.com/Hakko-Cleaner-599B-02-Non-Corrosive-Needed/dp/B000PDQORU/ref=pd_cp_hi_0

 

I was told a magniftying glass, a small cheap one from deal extreme may be used but I have excelelnt 20/13 vision so I don't really think so.

 

How does this setup look? For audio I do not think I need any other tips other than the fine one it comes with.

post #2 of 39

Circuit Specialist Inc sell their CSI-StationA1 soldering station for $29.95 + shipping.

post #3 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleAngel View Post

Circuit Specialist Inc sell their CSI-StationA1 soldering station for $29.95 + shipping.

It looks like they got it from aoyue or aoyue's own oem(if they aren't the OEM themselves already) as that is basically the

Aoyue 936 which is the hakko or something 936 clone

 

AFter shipping, it would be the same if not more expensive than the Aoyue on Amazon.

 

:(

post #4 of 39

Cool, I want to improve my soldering rig too, and will look at what you have in mind.

post #5 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiteki View Post

Cool, I want to improve my soldering rig too, and will look at what you have in mind.

If I was actually going to be doing a lot of stuff and solder a lot

 

I would have gotten this

 

http://www.amazon.com/Aoyue-937-Digital-Soldering-Station/dp/B000I30QBW/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1341549097&sr=8-2&keywords=xytronic

 

But I won't be so I'm not.

post #6 of 39

I would recommend something along the lines of the Hakko/Aoyue or the WES51 I use but it's over your budget.

 

Also I would recommend 63/37 rosin core solder

 

Kiteki will probably want to go for the Cardas Quad Core solder..

post #7 of 39

How did you know that?  I already picked up that exact solder lol.  Did I make a mistake?

post #8 of 39

No, It's good solder.

I can tell from your posts you desire a certain level of performance.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kiteki View Post

How did you know that?  I already picked up that exact solder lol.  Did I make a mistake?

post #9 of 39
Thread Starter 
Why 63 solder? Usually 60/40 is fine so why 63? Im just curious? The price is also a lot cheaper so is it safe to use?

I really liked the aoyue 937+ but i dont know if i will really be using it that much.
post #10 of 39

63/37 has no "plastic" state making it much less susceptible to cold solder joints.

Solders with no plastic state are called "Eutectic" solder.

post #11 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avro_Arrow View Post

63/37 has no "plastic" state making it much less susceptible to cold solder joints.

Solders with no plastic state are called "Eutectic" solder.

I suppose this makes it good for audio then?

post #12 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post

I suppose this makes it good for audio then?

You may not be catching the engineering technical meaning behind the word "plastic" that Avro is using.  Outside of "Strength of Materials" or "Mechanics of Deformable Bodies", what he stated in simple terms means that the 63-37 alloy has the optimum melting point for a tin-lead mixture.  That means the 63-37 mixture will melt (or solidify) at a lower temperature than any other combination of tin and lead.

 

In practical terms, this means that a 63-37 solder will have a greater chance of making a good solder joint than any other kind of solder mixture of tin and lead, period.  The joints will be more shiny, the solder will melt more completely and cool with greater consistency than any other solder you can purchase - especially and including 60-40.   The 60-40 mixture is a bit less demanding in quality control to produce, hence its cheaper price.  However, the 63-37 will always yield a more consistent solder joint, all things being equal.

post #13 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomb View Post

You may not be catching the engineering technical meaning behind the word "plastic" that Avro is using.  Outside of "Strength of Materials" or "Mechanics of Deformable Bodies", what he stated in simple terms means that the 63-37 alloy has the optimum melting point for a tin-lead mixture.  That means the 63-37 mixture will melt (or solidify) at a lower temperature than any other combination of tin and lead.

 

In practical terms, this means that a 63-37 solder will have a greater chance of making a good solder joint than any other kind of solder mixture of tin and lead, period.  The joints will be more shiny, the solder will melt more completely and cool with greater consistency than any other solder you can purchase - especially and including 60-40.   The 60-40 mixture is a bit less demanding in quality control to produce, hence its cheaper price.  However, the 63-37 will always yield a more consistent solder joint, all things being equal.

Thank you very much!!

 

I'll go with 63-37. When looking at the various types. I wondered why 63-37 wasn't used more as it had a lower melting temperature...but I am just a noob at this. I really just solder and go and never really looked at the technical side of this!....which is why my two other soldering irons have gone to hell.

post #14 of 39

Eutectic solder refers to a mixture that goes directly from liquid to solid. Non eutectic solders have a range of temperatures in which some part of the alloy solidifies or melts and other parts don't resulting in a plastic phase where the material is soft and pliable--i.e. plastic.

 

IMHO, the difference (between 60:40 and 63:37 tin/lead) is that if a part is moving because you're holding it by hand, a eutectic solder could lead to occasionally less secure joints that look good, while a solder with a plastic-phase could lead to occasionally more reliable joints that look bad. Neither of those cases is a good thing, both being bad joints relatively speaking. Personally, I'd rather have the bad joint and check them than have bad looking joints that I redo as a matter of course, so I use eutectic, but this is because most bad joints with eutectic will look absolutely horrible, and many will feel weak. I feel it gives me more reliable results. For a beginner, it might be better to have the visibly bad looking joints, even if a lot of them are perfectly alright.

 

Maybe someone could say that better. Thing is, eutectic hardens instantly, so any movement leaves the part free to move. The plastic phase partly hardens, so the plastic phase stuff can look bad even if the part-being-soldered was stable (not moving) when the solder actually hardened, which would give a reliable, but ugly joint. You might end up remelting this joint as a matter of course.

 

If the parts are perfectly stable through the full plastic/hardening phase, you'll get good joints with either. In that case, you can still get occasional ugliness with eutectic, with wavy or spotted surface, instead of shiny. It's a consequence of the quick drying. Another reason I don't recommend eutectic for others, but still prefer it for myself.

 

Maybe one more try... Any movement at all will show up as waves or ugliness with 60:40, even if the joint is perfectly alright. With eutectic, not all good joints will be shiny, but most movement (during that short 1/2 second or so) will cause a bad joint.

 

Temperature isn't significant for for the two alloys mentioned here. The melting temperature for 63:37 is the same as the plastic temperature for 60:40, and the melting temperature for 60:40 is only 5C higher. The temperature difference for other formulations is more significant, so temperature considerations enter into it. Some of these have a large temperature difference between melting and plastic phases. I'd just stay away from any silver-bearing or unleaded solder that's not eutectic. Yet another reason I prefer to just learn to deal with eutectic and be done with it. Still, I have to admit 60:40 is more practical than 63:37 if that's all you ever use.


Edited by SiBurning - 7/7/12 at 10:20pm
post #15 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SiBurning View Post

Eutectic solder refers to a mixture that goes directly from liquid to solid. Non eutectic solders have a range of temperatures in which some part of the alloy solidifies or melts and other parts don't resulting in a plastic phase where the material is soft and pliable--i.e. plastic.

 

IMHO, the difference is that if a part is moving because you're holding it by hand, a eutectic solder could lead to a less secure joint that looks good, while a solder with a plastic-phase could lead to a more reliable joint that looks bad. Neither of those cases is a good thing, both being bad joints relatively speaking.

Thank you, I'll take a look at the two and make my descision from there but this is a rather simple and what not! But thank you very very much for that in depth explanation of some pro's and con's.

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