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V-Moda / M-100 NON Fanboy feedback - Page 12

post #166 of 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by UCLA 15 View Post

How many features can headphones have? 

Very few headphones have built-in amps. I don't really think you can be disappointed in a company for not including a built-in amp in a new model.

The M-100s will have removable cables, dual entry for cables (which is relatively rare), an emergency jettison feature, and folding hinges (which, imo, is one of the biggest things V-Moda headphones have been lacking so far).

The only feature I can think of that the M-100s are missing is sideways rotation of the cups. That's not a huge problem, because a lot of headphones don't offer that. It was a bigger problem with the M-80s because the supra-aural design could hurt your ears if they didn't fit the angle of them perfectly. 

I'm still hoping the M-100s deliver on more than just bass improvements. The lack of clarity and hidden nature of the mids still needs to be the thing V-Moda most improves on, or else I'll be wondering why I should drop $300 on them. 

X2 regarding the features. I'm sure the sound will improve since they've taken a lot of time tuning them, not to mention AnakChan had some very good things to say. I had no problem with the M-80 conforming to my ears however (it takes a little time but it happens) and the mids were the best part for me besides the great bass extension and soundstage (which not many supraaurals can do). The only thing that is slightly lacking is the sparkle in the highs and it's already confirmed they will extend a bit further on the M-100. Yep I think we will see big improvements across the board; I'm expecting a bigger soundstage as well. Can't wait.
Edited by roma101 - 7/28/12 at 4:53pm
post #167 of 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by UCLA 15 View Post

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

How many features can headphones have? 

 

Very few headphones have built-in amps. I don't really think you can be disappointed in a company for not including a built-in amp in a new model.

 

The M-100s will have removable cables, dual entry for cables (which is relatively rare), an emergency jettison feature, and folding hinges (which, imo, is one of the biggest things V-Moda headphones have been lacking so far).

 

The only feature I can think of that the M-100s are missing is sideways rotation of the cups. That's not a huge problem, because a lot of headphones don't offer that. It was a bigger problem with the M-80s because the supra-aural design could hurt your ears if they didn't fit the angle of them perfectly. 

 

I'm still hoping the M-100s deliver on more than just bass improvements. The lack of clarity and hidden nature of the mids still needs to be the thing V-Moda most improves on, or else I'll be wondering why I should drop $300 on them. 

 

 

Well - they always have the 60-day guarantee. Which is why I'm going to try them out. 

 

Also, about the features, it's not that I don't want them - it's that they're not something new like amps in the headphones. I love the fact that they have folding hinges, but I would have liked it more if they also rotated, since that makes it easier to have full-size headphones around your neck. Having an amp built in is a good feature in my eyes, because it reduces bulk, and improves the SQ (usually), so that people don't need to worry about low-powered players.

 

I think if I had to explain it, it'd be the size of the feature. Folding, removable cables, hinges - they're all more common than something like a built in amp, which is new and relatively exciting (especially in a headphone industry that doesn't change that fast).

post #168 of 324

That was kind of my point: headphones are fundamentally simple products, and they have always had pretty much a limited set of features. I agree that rotating cups is about the only feature (that has been commonplace on headphones over the years) that is missing. I don't count the amp as a feature the M-100s should have had because so few (even new) headphones have them. What other kinds of features do you think headphones should or will have in the near future? The only thing that I would wager will become a commonplace feature on headphones in the near future is the built in amp. 

 

V-Moda Revolver? I wouldn't be surprised if V-Moda held off on the built-in amp for the M-100 just so they could have it be the focus for the Revolver.

post #169 of 324

Speaking about built-in amps in headphones, it seems like the Denon AH-D400 has a pending release date of the 27th of August.

 

I'm sure we'll see some reviews of them before then.

post #170 of 324

I've never seen a fully modular design on a headphone, that would be an awesome feature.

post #171 of 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Ham Sandwich View Post

I've never seen a fully modular design on a headphone, that would be an awesome feature.

What kind of modular are you talking about? Down to the drivers? What?

post #172 of 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRSxIgnition View Post

What kind of modular are you talking about? Down to the drivers? What?


lol

post #173 of 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by SONIC BOOM View Post


lol

It could mean anything. He could want neon pink pads made out of moon-dust for all we know. biggrin.gif

post #174 of 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRSxIgnition View Post

What kind of modular are you talking about? Down to the drivers? What?

If a manufacturer were to design an awesome headband and a strong proprietary gimbal assembly for their headphone:

 

If a new model comes out, you can just upgrade to the new driver/cup assembly for less, or people have the option to buy the whole headphone of course.  Imagine you can just swap out entire driver/cup assemblies on the fly.

Or you can mod other cups/driver assemblies from other manufacturers with an adapter to attach them to the proprietary gimbal.

 

It could lower manufacturing costs since there's no more R&D into a headband for each model, it's the same concept as car manufacturers building different models on the same platform.  And since you can buy modular parts if someone were wanting to build a custom headphone they'd have somewhere to buy a high quality headband as a foundation for their project.

In fact, said company could even offer a customization service far-beyond engraved color shields, since the parts are modular.

There are lots of implications.

 

Modular.


Edited by A Ham Sandwich - 7/28/12 at 11:06pm
post #175 of 324

The only completely modular headphones I know of are the Sennheiser HD25-1 II. Every single part is replaceable, though there aren't really any aftermarket or customizable parts for it.

post #176 of 324

I know about the HD-25's modular construction but I think there's a basic philosophical difference between it and what I was suggesting.  What I'm suggesting is designed as modular and customizable from the outset, and replacing the cup/driver assembly would require no tools.  I'm imagining a mechanism similar to that which holds a seat onto a mountain bike, you could conceivably have a single headphone that would allow you to change out the drivers in 20 seconds, so like if you're changing genres and want a different sound sig, for example.


Edited by A Ham Sandwich - 7/29/12 at 12:05am
post #177 of 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by roma101 View Post

In most cases amps are unnecessary.

 

unless you happend to be in Europe where nearly all Daps have the dreaded volume-cap... which in real terms equates to around 70/75% of power output compared to the rest of the world... amping via portable or headphones seems pretty sensible to me, common-sense if you like.

 

btw... this is a non-fanboy thread and it really doesn't matter who reviews headphones it's 'your ears' that matter, not theirs.

The Hammer

Here at Noble, we craft some of the finest universal and custom in-ear monitors available today. 

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post #178 of 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by OK-Guy View Post
btw... this is a non-fanboy thread and it really doesn't matter who reviews headphones it's 'your ears' that matter, not theirs.

 

Sound preference is developed by perception of importance due to a significant experience.  Reviews give a relativistic point of view on sound that's based on a commonly accepted, though fluidly evolving, vocabulary that attempts to represent the subjective experience of the listener.  Though imperfect, even one review is better than nothing.  While perception differs among people, our anatomy is a common denominator and thus euphony has many common elements amongst human auditory perception.

 

In other words, reviews are helpful.


Edited by A Ham Sandwich - 7/29/12 at 4:06am
post #179 of 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Ham Sandwich View Post

 

Sound preference is developed by perception of importance due to a significant experience.  Reviews give a relativistic point of view on sound that's based on a commonly accepted, though fluidly evolving, vocabulary that attempts to represent the subjective experience of the listener.  Though imperfect, even one review is better than nothing.  While perception differs among people, our anatomy is a common denominator and thus euphony has many common elements amongst human auditory perception.

 

In other words, reviews are helpful.

 

that was a hell of a explanation to arrive at three-words... ever thought of becoming a politician?

 

yes agreed, reviews are helpful but not definative.

The Hammer

Here at Noble, we craft some of the finest universal and custom in-ear monitors available today. 

Reply
post #180 of 324
Deleted
Edited by roma101 - 7/30/12 at 9:27am
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