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Another Hisoundaudio Studio-V Review: Small guy with a big sound

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 

STUDIO-V REVIEW

 

 

·         Pre-Introduction (you may want to skip this)

·         Introduction

·         Package & Built Quality

·         Battery Life & User Interface

                ·         Sound Quality

·         Brief Comparisons with the Walkman NW-Z1070 & Ibasso DX100

·         Conclusion

 

 

 

Pre-introduction

 

 

The Walkman NW-Z1000 series has surprisingly been my benchmark for DAPs in the mid priced bracket surpassing the likes of the many mainstream portables out there.  The truth is that I have been eyeing on the Studio V way before I gotten the Sony. However, a couple of feedbacks on its buggy UI, hissing issues with BAs and lack of indepth reviews have deterred me from splashing $379(USD) on this player. I was about to end my journey with portable audios before I came across Noisymotel (in recent partnership with HiSoundAudio) who offered me a 50% discount in exchange for a review on the Studio V so I was like DAAAMN. Special thanks to you guys for letting me qualify for this fantastic offer!

 

My take on this review will be slightly different from what you have read of this player. I will be reviewing from both my personal and consumer point of view so potential buyers will know what to expect.

 

Do take it with a pinch of salt though as I am judging with my my own pair of ears, not yours  =)

 

 

 

 

Introduction

 

 

     drJyN.jpg

Quote:

 

Earphone amplifier grade: Hisound's proprietory HiFi amplifier

Memory capacity: 4Gbexpanding SD card slot.

Card Compliance : Micro SD,  SDHC,

Battery capacity: 2000Ma rechargeable Li-io. battery

Battery continually playing time: > 85hours  volume set at 3 degree

Supported  formatsMP3, WMA, WAV,FlacAAC, OGG

Screen: 1 inch OLED

UI Operation: Mechanical key button operation ( one-hand and blind operation capability)

USB type: mini USB 2.0 

Dimension81.85mm L x 50mm W x 20.65 (MM)

Weight140G

(I have only included the main specifications, rest can be found at http://www.hisoundaudio.com/products/players/2012/0508/10.html)

 

There are 3 HiSoundAudio DAPs up to date:  the Studio V, it's little brother Rocoo P and the recently released Rocoo BA (for BA IEMs, we'll get more on it later). If I'm not mistaken, there was a previous version of Studio V (8 gb version) released 1-2 years ago but has been phased out. HiSoundAudio has also manufactured IEMs particular the 'POPO series' which have garnered good reviews despite its cheesy name.

 

 

 

 

 

Package & Built Quality

 

 

Jq0n6.jpgWfPA3.jpg

 

 

 

I was indeed surprised by how much effort was put into the packaging. The box is of premium quality (leather made) and included accessories are the stock earphones, wall charger, usb cable, manuals and a discount card for future purchases.

 

 

BHGYR.jpg

 

 

The built is fantastic! The player feels as solid as a brick (literally), the 'studio' is engraved, buttons are really sturdy and the brushed effect complements the design well.

 

The back panel seems to be made of aluminum and is fairly reflective  making it susceptible to fingerprints, user marks and even scratches! It totally reminds me of the back panel of an ipod touch.

 

 

Bottom and Top Views Respectively

 

RZS0R.jpgaTrAu.jpg

 

 

 

 

Battery Life 

 

 

I decided to create a section for this as the battery life is the main feature of the studio V compared to the Rocoo P/BA and even other DAPs in the market. Based on specifications, this portable is expected to last 85hours @ vol 3 degree on mp3 format. I'm assuming the 'degree' equates to each steps of the vol markers (total = 31). Vol 14-18 commands the average listening experience I had with the various IEMs tested.

 

The first test was conducted after a full battery charge on top of what was left when I first received the studio V. The unit was allowed to left running in a 30mins break/hr interval with the playback of FLAC files @ vol 16. Each battery bar (4 in total) drained after approximately 12 hours and the total running time accumulated was 50 hours.

 

The second test was conducted at the same conditions except that the unit was allowed continuously to run (no intervals). Sadly it only lasted for a day.

 

50 hours is indeed impressive for a DAP with a built in amplifier and I expect the studio V to last even longer with a lesser continuous running time.

 

 

 

User Interface / Software

 

 

Operation of the studio V is indeed idiot proof. It mainly involves the 4 small directional buttons (for selections/rewind/skipping tracks and etc) with the middle button acting as the play/pause/back to menu/on/off function with either a single tap or a 2 second hold. It works similarly to the Sansa clip. No complains here.

 

Now let's begin on the positive side of the UI. It is indeed minimalist, convenient and practical.  Again the Studio V UI is very similar to the Sansa clip. There is also a 'resource manager' option where you are able to browse your files in a file explorer format.  Play mode includes 'repeat once, repeat all and random formats. The OLED screen is indeed gorgeous and works well against glaring conditions. The studio V also uses MSC mode (drag and drop).

 

What you need to know begins here (*holds breath*). I will list down all the bothersome quirks and my thoughts on them.

 

- The Studio V takes an average 1min 30 seconds to load 40gb worth of files during startup. A particular user on head-fi told me that the rocoo players are extremely buggy with ID3v2 tags. Another guy claimed that after converting his tags to ID3v1, his startup reduced to ~10seconds. So once I'm out, I will never switch this thing off and thank god for the battery life.

 

- You will rather be using the Resource Manager (file explorer format) to browse your files rather tha. the standard Artist/Music layout. With the default layout, there is about 1.5 seconds lag time when scrolling from page to page so it will take ages to browse 64gb worth of files in the small screen. However, the resource manager operates really quick with no lags in between.

 

- You'll need to format your 64gb microSD to FAT32 before using. I think this very typical for many of the DAPs out there.

 

- No playlist. You can only add songs to a 'favourites' list where it will be saved and serve your only form of playlist (very similar to the cowon).

 

- Problems playing FLAC files compression >lvl 5 onwards and sometimes it couldn't detect them.  Level 4 and below works best for me.

 

- During song playback, you are unable to go back to the current folder with a click of a button which means you have to cycle through the previous folders again. This is perhaps the biggest flaw of this player from my point of view.

 

 

The UI is indeed buggy but no4 to the extend that it will affect your listening experience or cause you several wave of frustrations. Thankfully there are workarounds to the quirks listed but it is ultimately up to you to decide whether it is worth the effort and time. 

 

 

 

Sound Quality

 

 

 

 

Quote:

IEMs tested with

 

Heir Audio 8.A customs

Westone 4

Shure SE535 Red

UE TF 10

Sennheisser CX300

 

 

 

A proper listening test was done after approximately 100 hours of burn-in. I have chose the following IEMs as I am really familiar with how they supposed to sound like and some of them were also involved in my audio journey with various portables.

 

The Studio V is equipped with a built in amplifier just like many of the high end DAPs out there. But I was told that the studio's DAC component is made by Sigmatel, a chip found in many low end $40-$50 mp3 players/PC mobos and based on specifications alone it even pales in comparison to a galaxy s3 cell phone which uses a wolfson chip. So does the Studio V sound inferior for the matter?

 

Wrong wrong wrong! The sound quality is truly remarkable and I am starting to wonder how hisoundaudio does it with a so called inferior DAC. There are also no EQs to mess around and there are only two sound signatures (dynamic & balance armature) you can play with by changing the firmware of this player. I have decided to stick with dynamic as the BA firmware is not neutral to my liking.

 

Two things that gives this small guy a big name: soundstage and imaging. It is simply airy, wide and places you at the 'right spot' depending on the type of music being played.  Even with a pair of cheap sennheisser buds, you are still able to feel your head turning into a live auditorium and the imaging even gets better as you go up the chain.

 

There is also plenty of 'power' / 'slam' in this player which makes your music really lively: plucking of strings and the dyn!mics on the piano keys have never felt so alive. This strong musicality trait of the Studio V makes vocals a joy to listen to as if you were at a live setting. The lows are pretty much concentrated in the sub regions. You can certainly hear the bass but to my ears, it really runs deep until it sort of feels as if the mid-bass (think of cowon's mach3bass) is lacking. 

 

There is no distinctive 'flavour' in this player. It is the most neutral player/uncoloured player I have heard which might give a 'dry' presentation to some. Thankfully the Studio V's soundstage imaging and 'power' complements really well with its neutral presentation. The player is also susceptible to poor recordings so do feed it right and it will reward you accordingly.

 

If there is one thing that prevents the Studio V from reigning the king of DAPs would be the lack of 'substance' in the extreme end of the frequency. Strings and keys are pretty much well portrayed but when it comes to cymbals things can get a little messy for the picky ones. I'm no good with charts but I assume it lies in the >5k region where the decay of the instrument doesnt feel right. Light and moderate played cymbals in most pop songs are actually fine but the problem becomes apparent in heavier songs.  In this case, the Studio V has a strong attack but dies and fades faster than the blink of an eye. I think drummers will know what I am trying to bring across. I have heard better quality highs but these setups alone are many more times expensive than the Studio V.

 

Another problem associated with the Studio V is apparently the hiss with high sensitive balance armatures. As a result, hisoundaudio has recently came out Rocoo BA which is a toned down version of the Studio V that deals with the hissing issue. App!rently, the 5 IEMs I tested with showed negligible (practically zero) amount of hiss.

 

Good news for heir audio users as the Studio V provides an excellent synergy with the 8.As. It complements really well with the 8.As warm sound, soundstage is expanded significantly and the amount of details brought across is simply breathtaking for such a portable unit. I dare to say that this setup is comparable to the Audeze LCD-2 Rev2 + Darkstar / Burson  (holy smokes.. who dares to make such bold statements!)

 

 

 

Brief comparisons other DAPs

 

 

Walkman NW-Z1070 (my benchmark for mid-priced DAPs)

 

The Studio V has a slightly cleaner sound than the walkman for a start. I find the walkman to be fairly neutral but the rocoo feels more transparent and dry.

 

Surprisingly both are relatively equally on par at low listening levels but the Studio V starts to shine when the volume is boosted. The imaging and 'slam' starts to kick in while the walkman somehow reaches a quick dead end with my customs due to the lack of 'juice' for the customs. The walkman gave me only a volume step left for most of my IEMs while I barely used half with the Studio V.

 

The Walkman Z is still a fantastic player while the Studio V has a only a slight advantage in the sound department, it triumphs the Sony over the power and portability it has to offer. I have read that the Studio has no problems driving headphones while the walkman has barely enough juice with my 35ohms customs.   

 

The Studio's built-in amplifier is indeed an advantage. Sadly I did not resort to an amp for my walkman as I was fairly satisfied with what it has to offer with my customs. I have only heard the Walkman Z with Fiio E11/E17 amp setups but the Studio V still outperforms them in both sound and portability. 

 

 

Ibasso DX 100 (1.03)

 

I only had a few hours of listening time with this player but it was long enough for me to make the most out of it. This would be a much fairer comparison than the walkman as both the Studio and Ibasso comes with built-in amplifiers with the latter exhibiting far more features (at a hefty price of course). On acceptable vol levels with my 8.As, the Studio V reached 18/31 while I had more than half left with the DX100.

 

The default sound signature of the DX100 is indeed similar to the Walkman Z so then again you might actually find the Studio V to be more dry than those two.

 

With my 8.As, the Ibasso demonstrated smoother tonal qualities in the upper registers. It has slightly better control over the decay preventing some of the harshness you can find in the Studio. However, I do find the imaging to be more impactful and alive on the Studio V (maybe it is just my ears).

 

I may get flamed by saying that the differences between the both of them are indeed minimal with IEMs and our usual 16bit recordings. The Ibasso will definitely flatter with harder to drive headphones and who knows that it might sound much better with higher resolution recordings (up to 24bit/192KHz) in which the Studio V is unable to support.

 

I had expected the DX100 to triumph over the Studio V due to its highly rated ES Sabre soundchip. Surprsingly this is not the case and the Studio V is definitely a worthy competitor to the higher end portables.

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

With its small form factor and sound output,  there is no doubt that the Studio V smashes other portable setups in this price range and surprisingly holds a strong ground against the higher end audio setups out there. The Studio V has its own set of issues so do read up more about its UI and most importantly the sensitivity range of your IEMs (the 5 IEMs I tested with works fine with the Studio V). The recently released Rocoo BA has no hissing issues but I do not know if there is a compromise in sound quality.

 

The Studio V is indeed a fine masterpiece between the lines of sound and portability. I cannot simply think of any other small DAPs with such a big sound.


Edited by underhysteria - 6/30/12 at 6:14pm
post #2 of 38

Nice review hysteria. I have a feeling you were referring to me in the comment regarding the start up time. If you need help getting that fixed just PM me and I'll walk you through the steps. I know having dirty tags (clutter) and v3.2 tags imbedded in the tags will significantly increase the start up times. Lets say I take out the 32GB sd card and reinsert it. It will take about 30 to 40 seconds to boot on the first boot because I took out the card and it needs to rebuild the data base. But after this every subsequent restart will take roughly 10 seconds to boot and this is a 32GB card filled to max capacity with FLAC files. The on-board is also maxed out in FLAC.

 

PS: I'm an impatient person so a fast boot-up is a must lol ;)
 


Edited by lee730 - 6/28/12 at 4:18pm
post #3 of 38

Great review! Haha I hope the sound is a big enough factor for you to keep the player :)

 

Btw, the back panel is acrylic.


Edited by Cryok95 - 6/28/12 at 11:43pm
post #4 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

Nice review hysteria. I have a feeling you were referring to me in the comment regarding the start up time. If you need help getting that fixed just PM me and I'll walk you through the steps. I know having dirty tags (clutter) and v3.2 tags imbedded in the tags will significantly increase the start up times. Lets say I take out the 32GB sd card and reinsert it. It will take about 30 to 40 seconds to boot on the first boot because I took out the card and it needs to rebuild the data base. But after this every subsequent restart will take roughly 10 seconds to boot and this is a 32GB card filled to max capacity with FLAC files. The on-board is also maxed out in FLAC.

 

PS: I'm an impatient person so a fast boot-up is a must lol ;)
 

 

  HI, LEE 730, Thanks for your sharing the experience of increasing the boot time.Many users want to learn on how to creat the clearn data base? Could you make it more detailed? thanks.

post #5 of 38

Ive been thinking about buying the studio v but I dont know if I could get used to the browsing and lag!! Is this really bothersome or have you gotten used to it?

post #6 of 38

No problem Jack.
 

Step 1: Download Mp3tag

 

Step 2: Go into Tool/Options. Under Tags you have Mpeg and Ape, Mpc... You want to make sure Read is check marked for both Mpeg and Ape. For "Write" make sure only ID3v1 is checked (for both Mpeg and Ape). Under "Remove" check ID3v2 and APE. If you have APE files it is recommended not to use them as those files work slow on the Studio V. Convert them over to FLAC instead. Then select Ok to apply changes in options.

 

Step 3: Drag and drop your files you wish to apply this to. I recommend doing this from your Hard drive if you wanna save time as the changes can be applied much faster this way. Then again reloading your Studio V and SD card could take the same amount of time. It's really only a 1 time process thing so it's not a big deal. Anyways once you've dragged and dropped the files you wish to apply these changes to, highlight all the files or click on the "Filename" area and then press Ctrl + A. Now Select Remove tags or that big X just below "Edit" (top left corner area of Mp3tag). Once all tags have been removed simply click "undo Changes" located next to "Remove tags". This will restore all your tags on the fly except for v3.2 tags. To be on the safe side you can also select "Save" to ensure these changes stay. This is located to the left of "Remove tags".

 

Step 4: I also recommend cleaning up your tags. If you have junk such as "Comment", "Composer", "Disc number", and "embedded album art" this will all contribute to slowing down your device. I'll tell you how to remove all this on the fly. Again press Ctrl + A to hilight all your files. Then under Comment/Composer/Disc number select <blank> for them all. Once you've completed this now right click on the album art area (located below disc number). Select "Remove Cover". Now all you have to do now is Select "Save" and it will apply all these changes for you (just make sure all your files are constantly hilighted when doing all the above directions in order to apply them).

 

Problem should be solved and your player should be rather responsive on start up. Mine takes roughly 16 seconds (correction) to load from the SD card and on-board. I did a countdown myself and it's 16 seconds for my unit (20 seconds if you start the countdown from when you first power the unit on). Enjoy folks! :)


Edited by lee730 - 6/29/12 at 9:46pm
post #7 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryok95 View Post

Great review! Haha I hope the sound is a big enough factor for you to keep the player :)

 

Btw, the back panel is acrylic.

 

Alright thanks for the input. However I am unable to edit my post as headfi will somehow screw up with the codings after submission.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JosephKim View Post

Ive been thinking about buying the studio v but I dont know if I could get used to the browsing and lag!! Is this really bothersome or have you gotten used to it?

 

There is no lag when browsing through the resource manager (file explorer) like i said. It is best if your songs are arranged in titles so you do know immediately what they are. If it is in a 'artist-title' format, then you have to wait for the 'artist' to scroll by the 1inch screen.

 

I rely on the playlist alot (wish there are more) so once the songs are up, it doesnt bother me anymore. Some guys here compile their favourite songs in a single folder and play them randomly.

 

But like I said, I'm more of a playlist guy haha.


Edited by underhysteria - 6/29/12 at 7:20pm
post #8 of 38

Underhysteria, Thank you for the well written review, also some great pics. Yes the packaging is very nice indeed.Build Quality also is top notch. Very nice player indeed....

Lee730, also a big thanks goes out to you for that information.....Your a champ....and of course  Big thanks to Jack for giving us such a nice player.

post #9 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by maguire View Post

Underhysteria, Thank you for the well written review, also some great pics. Yes the packaging is very nice indeed.Build Quality also is top notch. Very nice player indeed....

Lee730, also a big thanks goes out to you for that information.....Your a champ....and of course  Big thanks to Jack for giving us such a nice player.

 

Thank you for the comment.

 

 

I see that you have the highly sensitive UM customs. Do they hiss with the Studio V?

post #10 of 38

Yes they do, but Im sure Jack & the team can fix this problem.... I also purchased the yellow attenuator cable from Jack, which by the way stops the hiss but for me being the fussy git that i am just seems to cut out some of those glorious dynamics, which once heard ...well settling for second best is kinda hard.

post #11 of 38

Thank you for the review underhysteria smily_headphones1.gif .

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryok95 View Post

 

Btw, the back panel is acrylic.

 

Good catch, Cryok95.  The quick click of a fingernail indicates that the back panel is made of a plastic compound, not aluminum.

 

 

.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

No problem Jack.
 

Step 1: Download Mp3tag

 

Step 2: Go into Tool/Options. Under Tags you have Mpeg and Ape, Mpc... You want to make sure Read is check marked for both Mpeg and Ape. For "Write" make sure only ID3v1 is checked (for both Mpeg and Ape). Under "Remove" check ID3v2 and APE. If you have APE files it is recommended not to use them as those files work slow on the Studio V. Convert them over to FLAC instead. Then select Ok to apply changes in options.

 

Step 3: Drag and drop your files you wish to apply this to. I recommend doing this from your Hard drive if you wanna save time as the changes can be applied much faster this way. Then again reloading your Studio V and SD card could take the same amount of time. It's really only a 1 time process thing so it's not a big deal. Anyways once you've dragged and dropped the files you wish to apply these changes to, highlight all the files or click on the "Filename" area and then press Ctrl + A. Now Select Remove tags or that big X just below "Edit" (top left corner area of Mp3tag). Once all tags have been removed simply click "undo Changes" located next to "Remove tags". This will restore all your tags on the fly except for v3.2 tags. To be on the safe side you can also select "Save" to ensure these changes stay. This is located to the left of "Remove tags".

 

Step 4: I also recommend cleaning up your tags. If you have junk such as "Comment", "Composer", "Disc number", and "embedded album art" this will all contribute to slowing down your device. I'll tell you how to remove all this on the fly. Again press Ctrl + A to hilight all your files. Then under Comment/Composer/Disc number select <blank> for them all. Once you've completed this now right click on the album art area (located below disc number). Select "Remove Cover". Now all you have to do now is Select "Save" and it will apply all these changes for you (just make sure all your files are constantly hilighted when doing all the above directions in order to apply them).

 

Problem should be solved and your player should be rather responsive on start up. Mine takes roughly 16 seconds (correction) to load from the SD card and on-board. I did a countdown myself and it's 16 seconds for my unit (20 seconds if you start the countdown from when you first power the unit on). Enjoy folks! :)

 

Thanks for the quick guide, lee730.  Just so people aren't surprised by the results, though, they should be warned that ID3v1 tags are quite limited relative to ID3v2 tags; that is, much information will be lost by deleting the ID3v2 tags (because ID3v1 tags have character limits, etc.).  I would recommend making copies of one's archived music files to use with the Studio V, then removing the ID3v2 tags from these copies so that the Studio V loads faster but your music library loses no information.

 

 

 

Now a question:  I want to upgrade to 64 GB MicroSD cards but can only find SanDisk 64GB MicroSD SDXC cards.  Does anybody know for a fact that SDXC cards work with the Studio V?  Thanks in advance for any help.


Edited by LouieChuckyMerr - 7/4/12 at 3:40am
post #12 of 38
Quote:

Thanks for the quick guide, lee730.  Just so people aren't surprised by the results, though, they should be warned that ID3v1 tags are quite limited relative to ID3v2 tags; that is, much information will be lost by deleting the ID3v2 tags (because ID3v1 tags have character limits, etc.).  I would recommend making copies of one's archived music files to use with the Studio V, then removing the ID3v2 tags from these copies so that the Studio V loads faster but your music library loses no information.

 

 

 

Now a question:  I want to upgrade to 64 GB MicroSD cards but can only find SanDisk 64GB MicroSD SDXC cards.  Does anybody know for a fact that SDXC cards work with the Studio V?  Thanks in advance for any help.

 

Great point. I actually made an extra copy of the files specifically for my Studio V so when I removed all extras (mainly album art). But I never had issues with just v3.1 tags. Then again most of my files I applied this to are FLAC files. With mp3 files I was able to use 3.2 files so thanks for pointing that out. But I do find the Studio V to be very revealing and mp3 files to not take full advantage of this DAPs capabilities.

 

Regarding your question on the 64GB Sandisk Micro SD card; you can use it. SWcheater has successfully used the card. You just have to reformat the card in FAT32 and it should work. Just don't put files over 1GB in size to be safe.

post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

Great point. I actually made an extra copy of the files specifically for my Studio V so when I removed all extras (mainly album art). But I never had issues with just v3.1 tags. Then again most of my files I applied this to are FLAC files. With mp3 files I was able to use 3.2 files so thanks for pointing that out. But I do find the Studio V to be very revealing and mp3 files to not take full advantage of this DAPs capabilities.

 

I archive in flac whenever possible but I listen in mp3 so that I can normalize the volume (using the freeware Mp3Gain; http://mp3gain.sourceforge.net/) of all the files on my player, thus avoiding sudden painful gains or annoying drops in volume. For example, older jazz albums were mastered around 88 dB while present-day metal tends to be mastered around 100 dB. Also, modern masters tend to be horribly clipped at the high end and I can eliminate this using Mp3Gain. I notice a tiny (~5%) difference between 320 kbps CBR and V0 (~245 kbps) mp3 files--or is it my imagination?--but I can't hear any difference between 320 mp3 and flac. Maybe my ears are just old . As for ID3v2 tags, the Studio V has no issue recognizing them on mp3's however the load time for 25 GB of files drops from almost 5 minutes to less than 30 seconds when the ID3v2 tags are deleted (at the cost of losing long file names, etc.).

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

Regarding your question on the 64GB Sandisk Micro SD card; you can use it. SWcheater has successfully used the card. You just have to reformat the card in FAT32 and it should work. Just don't put files over 1GB in size to be safe.

 

Not to appear paranoid, but do you know for a fact that this is a MicroSDXC card? All I'm able to find in the 64 GB realm are the red and gray SanDisk Mobile Ultra MicroSDXC cards, and I'd hate to buy a couple only to find out that they don't play nice with the Studio V.

post #14 of 38

i had a studio v before but i sold it after replacement due to headphone jack problems. i agree that they do match against those higher-end daps like hm801/dx100 and i wouldn't sold the studio v (and get the dx100) if it really pairs well with my headphones. unfortunately using the studio V with the cd900st--- most music that i usually play became harsh, the setup is too much revealing/analytical to my tastes.

 

i also never had a problem with the UI after 5-10 minutes of playing around, i already gotten used to it. comparing with cowon or ipod the UI is far more intuitive than those two, IMO.

 

although me (and my friends) still think that the studio v has some already built-in eq inside it that it cheats (in a good way) most headphones/iems to sound pretty good!

 

BTW, does your unit always have to set the playback to "random" everytime you switch on the studio V? i need to always set the playback to random everytime i switch on the player which is the only thing i find annoying with the studio V.

 

not sure if anyone posted this in the other threads but if anyone has problems or errors with the unit, like ghost folders and such (if those problems still exist) i suggest to connect the studio V to the computer, cut the system folder to your desktop (or simply delete it), disconnect then the studio V to the computer, then reboot the studio V. it will recreate a new system folder and those problems (like ghost folders) will be gone.

post #15 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by LouieChuckyMerr View Post

 

I archive in flac whenever possible but I listen in mp3 so that I can normalize the volume (using the freeware Mp3Gain; http://mp3gain.sourceforge.net/) of all the files on my player, thus avoiding sudden painful gains or annoying drops in volume. For example, older jazz albums were mastered around 88 dB while present-day metal tends to be mastered around 100 dB. Also, modern masters tend to be horribly clipped at the high end and I can eliminate this using Mp3Gain. I notice a tiny (~5%) difference between 320 kbps CBR and V0 (~245 kbps) mp3 files--or is it my imagination?--but I can't hear any difference between 320 mp3 and flac. Maybe my ears are just old . As for ID3v2 tags, the Studio V has no issue recognizing them on mp3's however the load time for 25 GB of files drops from almost 5 minutes to less than 30 seconds when the ID3v2 tags are deleted (at the cost of losing long file names, etc.).

 

 

 

 

Not to appear paranoid, but do you know for a fact that this is a MicroSDXC card? All I'm able to find in the 64 GB realm are the red and gray SanDisk Mobile Ultra MicroSDXC cards, and I'd hate to buy a couple only to find out that they don't play nice with the Studio V.

 

I am positive the card is a Micro SDXC card. If you are concerned contact SWCheater by PM and confirm it for yourself. He has the Studio V and has a 64 GB card in his unit. But in order to use it you have to format it to FAT32. Same goes for the Sflo2/T51, Hifiman 601 etc. They all work with the card but you need the SD to micro SD converter to use the card on Hifimans products.

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